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Moose

1.5 amp float charger: how long to charge dead bat

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01 5sp non-S US model 986. 120 amp alternator. Just changed the volt regulator. Earlier connected red wire to B2+ along with black wire. Per Loren, changed red wire to B1+. Refitted alt to engine block. Now, of course, battery is dead. Hooked up to 1.5 amp Craftsman float charger. Man, it's taking forever. It's been on there over 20 hours and has managed to give enough juice to make a slow 3/4 crank. Whirr-whirr-whiiiiiiirrrr. Click. Click. Click. So . . .

How long to fully charge depleted 12 volt car battery with a 1.5 amp float charger/maintainer?

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I read in the archives it could take weeks to recharge a completely depleted battery using a mere maintainer. Looks like I will be taking my battery to Sears to have them charge it on a real charger. :(

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By definition float chargers are not meant to totally recharge a battery. As opposed to a trickle charger, 5-10 amps, which will recharge your battery in 10-15 hours.

The easist thing for you to do is to jump the car with either a standalone battery or another car. Then drive it for 30 minutes or so.

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01 5sp non-S US model 986. 120 amp alternator. Just changed the volt regulator. Earlier connected red wire to B2+ along with black wire. Per Loren, changed red wire to B1+. Refitted alt to engine block. Now, of course, battery is dead. Hooked up to 1.5 amp Craftsman float charger. Man, it's taking forever. It's been on there over 20 hours and has managed to give enough juice to make a slow 3/4 crank. Whirr-whirr-whiiiiiiirrrr. Click. Click. Click. So . . .

How long to fully charge depleted 12 volt car battery with a 1.5 amp float charger/maintainer?

It could take months to charge the battery with a 1.5 amp Maintenance charger. Even if you get your car started, you could damage the alternator because the alternator was not designed to operate at maximum output to charge a dead battery. Maybe you could take the battery to a local repair shop to fully charge it? You can purchase an inexpensive hydrometer and measure the specific gravity to determine when the battery is fully charged. You can also go to the Interstate Battery website to get helpful information on charging a battery. Do not try starting your car with the battery charger plugged into the wall, you could damage electronics in the car. The battery, when fully charged, is a large capacitor and absorbs the surges.

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Thanks, taking it to a shop tomorrow to get it charged. Then I'll test the alternator's ability to recharge once the car is running (hopefully). Leaf tour this weekend. Hopefully it will be working by then. Many thanks again.

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