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I am at 85,000 miles and do not want to wait to the 160k maintenance schedule. The Asin transmission in the 2011 Cayenne has a screw in fill plug. I assume one of the Mitivac adapters fits (the Toyota one MVA581)?  How much oil does one pump in or does one just measure the dirty oil? I assume the engine is at idle and the oil in the pan is at 40 deg centigrade while filling.

 

Mike

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The DIY is excellent but the 2011 Cayenne has eliminated the 17mm fill plug on the pan. The drain plug has the overflow tube but I have not figured out the best way to fill while the engine is running.

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Problem solved.  The 2011 has a fill port on the side (drivers) of the Transmission with a Torx 55 plug. Unfortunately the fill plug is very tight and with little room for a socket or fingers. The rest of the process is as described in the DIY article for the earlier model. A garden sprayer with a pipe bent into a hook was used to fill. The fill plug should be inserted before the engine runs to heat the ATF to 40 degrees . My car has a 36mm stand pipe in the drain plug; I note the parts diagram shows two lengths.. The ATF was dirty and the four magnets had some filings.

 

I am glad I serviced the Transmission at 90,000 miles rather than the scheduled 160,000 recomended.

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I'm looking to change the transmission fluid on my 2011 CTT, you don't need the special service tools listed below to fill it up?

Part # VAS6262-2 ( screw in adapter )
Part # VAS6262A ( tool for filling up transmission )

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1 hour ago, jayi836 said:

I'm looking to change the transmission fluid on my 2011 CTT, you don't need the special service tools listed below to fill it up?

Part # VAS6262-2 ( screw in adapter )
Part # VAS6262A ( tool for filling up transmission )

 

You will need the proper tools to remove the fill plug - as well you will need a digital thermometer to check the transmission is heated to the proper temperature before filling.

  • Upvote 1

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Loren, if you have a Durametric or IcarScan tool you can read the transmission oil temperature directly with them. I believe that's how a dealer would do it..

Edited by deilenberger

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13 hours ago, deilenberger said:

Loren, if you have a Durametric or IcarScan tool you can read the transmission oil temperature directly with them. I believe that's how a dealer would do it..

The Durametric  will read transmission temp in the older 955 models but not the 958 model. I have done an ATF change on my 2011 958 Diesel and couldn't get it to work.  It was confirmed by Durametric  that the facility is not available on the newer model

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Dougg - interesting the iCarScan will do it fine with the 958. I think Durametric is really falling behind the curve on value and the diagnostics ability. At one time it was the only thing out there - no so anymore - and other options give more value for the money.

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So I'm about to service my transmission at the next oil change, will get the filters and fluids from the dealer (Sunset or Gaudin) the fill fitting is a Part # VAS6262-2 fill plug adapter. Its a VW tool plenty of them on Amazon.

I have a fill pump with a shut off I made for my 996. There are plenty of write ups for the 996 on how to fill the Tiptronic. The only thing different on the 958 is the fill tube (above the drain plug) that regulates the proper fluid level.

As Loren suggested get a 3rd party (good accuracy) digital thermometer one with a remote probe. After the initial fill start up run through the gears,  get to the correct temperature then add fluid or close the plug, (if the new discharged fluid has slowed to a drip). Seem like a bit of a challenge as the fill tube will be just enough space to get the probe in.

I plan to have an IR gun as a backup and measure the temp of the pan and  the fluid with the probe as it discharges.

 

Guys please correct me if any of this looks wrong.

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32 minutes ago, jayi836 said:

As Loren suggested get a 3rd party (good accuracy) digital thermometer one with a remote probe. After the initial fill start up run through the gears,  get to the correct temperature then add fluid or close the plug, (if the new discharged fluid has slowed to a drip). Seem like a bit of a challenge as the fill tube will be just enough space to get the probe in.

I plan to have an IR gun as a backup and measure the temp of the pan and  the fluid with the probe as it discharges.

 

Guys please correct me if any of this looks wrong.

 

The probe on the digital thermometer - if inserted in the fill tube will be measuring the temperature of the air in the transmission.. unless you insert it while fluid is pouring out of the fill tube (seems rather messy.)  I think plan B has more chance of success.  And the temperature isn't critical to 1-degree.. nor is the level IMHO.  Porsche owners do tend to obsess sometimes (I'm not innocent of this myself..)

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2 hours ago, deilenberger said:

 

The probe on the digital thermometer - if inserted in the fill tube will be measuring the temperature of the air in the transmission.. unless you insert it while fluid is pouring out of the fill tube (seems rather messy.)  I think plan B has more chance of success.  And the temperature isn't critical to 1-degree.. nor is the level IMHO.  Porsche owners do tend to obsess sometimes (I'm not innocent of this myself..)

 

You need a non contact infrared pyrometers that measures the temp of the fluid coming out, even drips, without touching it.:biggrin:  It can also be used to check the temperature of the trans pan the same way.

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Thanks for the additional information, Its a bit disappointing the Durametric doesn't have this feature,Anyone have any pic's of what the fluid looked like when changed early?

  I have 33K on my 2nd transmission. 160k on the ODO, I was thinking of just changing the fluid and and leaving the filter until 60K. However not sure if the fill tube is removable VIA drain plug.

Any thoughts on just replacing the fluid?

On my 996 after the filter change, I drained the tranny again after 1000 miles to get the remaining fluid that was in the ATF lines,cooler and torque converter.No surprise it was dark, however not as bad is the initial drain.

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8 hours ago, jayi836 said:

 I have 33K on my 2nd transmission. 160k on the ODO, I was thinking of just changing the fluid and and leaving the filter until 60K. However not sure if the fill tube is removable VIA drain plug.

If the fill tube wasn't removable via the drain plug you couldn't drain the oil except by removing the pan.

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Thanks Don, On some VW's you can remove the tube with an 8MM allen wrench. 

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Anyone that changed their Transmission fluid after 80-90K, have any issue with slippage?

I was told by (2) Indy's don't touch it until 160K. The dealer has the same response. 

whats the difference if you do it at 90 or 160K. 

I guess its cleaver marketing by the dealer to sell cars? Why would the Indy's refuse the work?

Not sure with synthetic fluid if it has different properties than older conventional transmissions and fluids.

Perhaps just a old wife's tale passed down and not a factor with a modern transmission.

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Just to put the service interval in perspective, we change the fluid in Tips around 40-50K miles, never waiting until 90K..........

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On ‎9‎/‎8‎/‎2017 at 9:07 AM, Loren said:

A dealer would use Porsche's PIWIS tester.

But any good 3rd party (good accuracy) digital thermometer will work.

Hi Loren

On a slightly different matter, are you aware of any alternative Porsche  'approved' ATF for the 958?

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2 hours ago, dougg996 said:

Hi Loren

On a slightly different matter, are you aware of any alternative Porsche  'approved' ATF for the 958?

 

I would stick with the Porsche approved brands - too many horror stories when alternatives are used.

JFP might be able to add something with his experiences too.

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19 hours ago, Loren said:

 

I would stick with the Porsche approved brands - too many horror stories when alternatives are used.

JFP might be able to add something with his experiences too.

 

We stick with the Porsche branded or approved fluids.  As Loren mentioned, some people have had some success with other brands, others were not so lucky and ended up with some experiencing significant issues. Porsche is  a little odd in the specs they use for their transmission lubes and fluids, and I can honestly say that we have never had problems by sticking with what they recommend.

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On ‎9‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 10:37 AM, Loren said:

 

I would stick with the Porsche approved brands - too many horror stories when alternatives are used.

JFP might be able to add something with his experiences too.

Thanks for your response, but was wondering whether there are "Porsche approved brands" apart from its own labelled product of ATF for the 958 Cayenne since Porsche has approved a range of engine oils for different models, and in the case of the 996tt, a Shell and a Fuchs ATF?

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