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23 hours ago, Ahsai said:

Usually you want to time the cams when the cam covers are still off (seal the covers only after timing is verified). In that case, you need those cam bridges to support the cams while you rotate crankshaft to adjust/verify timing.

Thank you.  The part that confuses me is that, if the crankshaft is at TDC for bank 1 and the intake and exhaust cams are locked with the cam lock tool (see attached image of cam lock similar to what came with my IMS tool kit where the ends of the cams must be in line for this cam lock to work), and the light metal chain links are aligned with dots in the cam sprockets, wouldn't that mean that bank 1 is properly timed at TDC?

 

I wasn't planning to rotate the crankshaft at all, in fact, I fear that if I rotate the crankshaft separately from the camshafts, I will be completely out of time and totally in trouble.

Am I using the wrong cam lock tool? what am I not considering?

IMS cam lock.jpg

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23 hours ago, Schnell Gelb said:

I found it helpful to use M6 s/s studs +washer+nut to hold down the 'bridges'. I was paranoid about causing any avoidable wear on the aluminum threads with steel bolts. Yes. it is a chore to measure and source the correct size/length but imho ,worth it.

Interesting...would you happen to have taken a photo of what you're describing?  I have a 3D printer and plan to print the cam support brackets and anything to help me would be greatly appreciated. 

 

Thank you!

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For your 5-chain engine, you need this set. You need the tool on the lower left to time the cams. Turn the crank at least 4 to 6 times after timing to verify timing, then you can reseal the cam cover.

 

https://m.ebay.com/itm/Porsche-911-Engine-996-997-Boxter-Engine-986-987-Cam-Camshaft-Timing-Tool-Kit/352353067432?epid=10003424989&hash=item5209e121a8:g:dSQAAOSwjRpZRKMR

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On 5/16/2018 at 10:11 PM, Ahsai said:

For your 5-chain engine, you need this set. You need the tool on the lower left to time the cams. Turn the crank at least 4 to 6 times after timing to verify timing, then you can reseal the cam cover.

 

https://m.ebay.com/itm/Porsche-911-Engine-996-997-Boxter-Engine-986-987-Cam-Camshaft-Timing-Tool-Kit/352353067432?epid=10003424989&hash=item5209e121a8:g:dSQAAOSwjRpZRKMR

Thank you for the link.  I ordered it right away and it's supposed to get here on Wednesday.  I just dropped the engine and will pull it out completely tomorrow, so there's no going back now! 

I now feel like I should change all sorts of other things while the engine is out.  I recently replaced the following:

 

1. AOS

2. Bank 1 camshaft position sensor

3. Starter

4. Alternator

5. All vacuum lines

6. coolant line to oil cooler

7. IMS

8. RMS

9. Clutch

10. Coolant expansion tank

11. Water pump and thermostat

12. Engine and tranny mounts

 

Spark plugs and oil tubes have 15,000 miles on them so not sure I need to change them again.

 

In addition to replacing the actuator tensioner guide rails, I'm thinking about replacing the following:

 

1. Oil pressure sending unit

2. Coolant temperature sensor

 

Can you think of anything else I should replace while I'm in there?  The car is running great except for cam deviation CEL.

 

Thanks!

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Suggest you inspect/test/upgrade the entire SAI system. It is prone to multiple failure points that are cheap and easy to deal with now but awful later. Jake sometimes suggested Knock sensors for the same reason.

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On 5/18/2018 at 10:18 PM, Schnell Gelb said:

Suggest you inspect/test/upgrade the entire SAI system. It is prone to multiple failure points that are cheap and easy to deal with now but awful later. Jake sometimes suggested Knock sensors for the same reason.

Noted - thank you!  Now that the engine is out I feel like I should do as much as possible.

Thank you all for your guidance!

 

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On 5/20/2018 at 5:50 PM, mdreef said:

Noted - thank you!  Now that the engine is out I feel like I should do as much as possible.

Thank you all for your guidance!

 

Good advice - thank you!

Now...I have read in several posts about using reverse thread bolts to release tension from the variocam actuators.  Does anyone know what size and thread pattern the bolts should be?  Also, where on earth do you find a reverse thread bolt?  Are these common?

 

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They are M8 x1.5 (I think - double check). There's a thread around here or Rennlist that tells how to make the compression tool out of a bicycle skewer. This is what I did and it worked perfectly. The threads on mine were right handed. Some people have found that theirs had left handed threads. You may be able to find the exact specs for the tool in this thread https://rennlist.com/forums/996-forum/983191-cel-came-back-finally-got-around-to-getting-a-durametric-11.html it's a thread I started last year when I did the chain tensioner pads on my motor. It's long and there's a bunch of unrelated stuff in there, but I cant find the exact info... Good luck

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On 5/22/2018 at 1:08 PM, dporto said:

They are M8 x1.5 (I think - double check). There's a thread around here or Rennlist that tells how to make the compression tool out of a bicycle skewer. This is what I did and it worked perfectly. The threads on mine were right handed. Some people have found that theirs had left handed threads. You may be able to find the exact specs for the tool in this thread https://rennlist.com/forums/996-forum/983191-cel-came-back-finally-got-around-to-getting-a-durametric-11.html it's a thread I started last year when I did the chain tensioner pads on my motor. It's long and there's a bunch of unrelated stuff in there, but I cant find the exact info... Good luck

Thanks dporto, I'll give this a shot!

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I found M5 L.H. s/s thread rod on Ebay. You also need the matching deep nuts. Use washers and a little grease. It all requires patience and finesse. No, there is not enough material to drill out and re-thread to M6 or an Imperial equivalent. Be careful with the bike skewer alternative.It may overwork the few little threads in the part. It doesn't matter if you wear the threads on the M5 rod/nuts.It does matter if you wear the threads in the actuator ! Compress the part in a vise(gently!!) and then insert the rod.Try to avoid using the rod to do much compressing.Keeping the part compressed with the minimum length of thread is a challenge.Then figure out how/when you are going to remove the rod. Zip ties can break under strain .....So if you use them, use the very best quality oil-resistant ones you can find..

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Oops...Sorry - M5 is correct... (skinny stuff). I think the main danger to mucking up the threads is if they are left handed. The bike skewer worked perfectly for me. SG is correct to point out that it's a good idea to try to compress the tensioner a bit as you screw the skewer/tool in to relieve some of the strain on the threads. IIRC you don't need a vice for this - I'm pretty sure I did it by hand (I know  didn't put my tensioners in a vice).

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Perfect timing, as I'll be doing this project today. 

Does anyone know/have torque settings for actuator bolts, oil pumps, and ignition coils? 

I found conflicting information of 10Nm or 14Nm for the cam covers - has anyone been able to confirm?

 

Thank you! 

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Just pulled out spark plugs and found a significant amount of carbon deposits on piston #1. Before I started this job (actuator pad replacement)  the car ran perfectly except for cam deviation fault. Again 135,000 miles so maybe to be expected. There was no ticking/clicking, etc...

So....the question then is, should I go deeper by going into the head?

 

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Carbon on #1 piston - is it too late for a leakdown test ? Oval/taper is a theoretical cause?

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So I replaced the actuator chain pads (both banks). I used the timing tool and aligned each cam as indicated and able to turn the crankshaft clockwise 6 times (each bank). Does that confirm that timing is correct?  

 

Now... is there a way to check for oil leaks from cam covers before I put the engine back in the car?  

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worked all weekend to get the engine back in the car and it started beautifully after letting it crank for oil circulation. 

 

I let it idle for a bit and shut it off to continue assembly of axles and body parts.  I was thrilled it started and sounded so well.  Then came the test drive and upon going into gear I got a blinking CEL P0300, P0301, P0304.

  

Part of this project was to replace my coil packs, which I did with BERU 997-602-107-02 coils.  The first thing I noticed was that part numbers were for 997 models, which caused me to worry and do some research.  It looks like they were upgraded at some point - but could this possibly the source of the multiple missfires?  

 

Is there any way to mix-up and install the wiring harnesses incorrectly?  It doesn't look like it to me, as they clearly have different relationships.  I also thought that maybe O2 sensors got mixed up, but that's not possible either.

 

I cleared the codes and now am only getting P0302 (cyl.2).  any ideas?

 

On another note, I screwed something up with shift linkage because I can no longer get reverse.  That's anoying!

 

Thank for your guidance along the way!

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Did you hear/feel a slight click when plugging the connectors on the coils? You may want to check and make sure the connections are tight.

 

The 997 p/n seems to be correct for a '01 996 per autoatlanta.

Edited by Ahsai

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As Duncan noted, the coils are the correct ones, so the problem lies elsewhere, possibly not having fully seated the connectors, which is a common problem.

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It is also possible to accidentally muddle adjacent connectors because the cable is long enough to connect to the wrong plug.

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I read about people not completely engaging the coil connections, so I was very careful about that. I think Schnell's scenario is the most likely. I'll try to switch them and report back.

 

The new coils are actually a tiny bit larger so I had to add spacers so the heat shields didn't hit them.

 

Thanks for your support. Without your help I would not have done this job! 

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