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oscaac

Windshield washer tank leak?

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I noticed some water on the back of my 911 (2005 997 Carrera) this afternoon. Looking under the car, found it was coming from the front, behind the driver-side tire. Looks like the windshield washer tank is leaking? Considering the car's age and that I've never had to replace it before, I assume that's it. Anyone know how hard to replace the tank is? 

911_water.JPG

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Sometimes it is a hose and sometimes it is the tank - only inspection will tell.

Remove the front tire and wheel well liner and you should see everything.

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I had mine done at the shop. The tank was cracked due to the plastic becoming brittle after 13 years.  I didn’t have the confidence to do it my self. I had the front suspension done at the same time as it was about knackered

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Jack the car up and remove the tire. The tank comes out after disconnecting a few bolts, wiring connections and the filler tube. It is likely the grommets that have gone bad, unless the tank is cracked.

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I have done this and the removal and replacement of the coolant tank, even with the engine lowered, is not a simple task as the tank is fully encased in the engine bay, is oddly shaped and quite long.(I am willing to bet is was installed prior to the engine install when these cars were manufactured.  Not sure why you would want to remove any tires/wheels  in an effort to remove it from underneath the car as there is no access to the tank from underneath the car.  Maybe if you took mufflers and muffler carrier brackets out ???  I would love to see that video. I removed and replaced tank from engine bay directly and while getting it out was a chore, getting it back in was something else again. Disconnecting stuff was the easy part but still requires some creativity. Getting the tank back in, on the other hand ,  requires lots of creativity and the patients of Job as the tank has to be positioned at just such and angle, due to the length odd shape  so as to allow it to  go in unhindered by  existing engine bay stuff. Need to memorize exactly how it came out I guess. Certainly do-able but not a 1 wrench.

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4 hours ago, dphatch said:

I have done this and the removal and replacement of the coolant tank, even with the engine lowered, is not a simple task as the tank is fully encased in the engine bay, is oddly shaped and quite long.(I am willing to bet is was installed prior to the engine install when these cars were manufactured.  Not sure why you would want to remove any tires/wheels  in an effort to remove it from underneath the car as there is no access to the tank from underneath the car.  Maybe if you took mufflers and muffler carrier brackets out ???  I would love to see that video. I removed and replaced tank from engine bay directly and while getting it out was a chore, getting it back in was something else again. Disconnecting stuff was the easy part but still requires some creativity. Getting the tank back in, on the other hand ,  requires lots of creativity and the patients of Job as the tank has to be positioned at just such and angle, due to the length odd shape  so as to allow it to  go in unhindered by  existing engine bay stuff. Need to memorize exactly how it came out I guess. Certainly do-able but not a 1 wrench.

 

I think this discussion is about the windshield washer tank.

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Loren,  I think you are exactly right. My mistake. Guess it was the "cracked tank" comment that got me going as only cracked issue I've had was with coolant tank.  Hope all will accept my  apology.

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4 hours ago, dphatch said:

Loren,  I think you are exactly right. My mistake. Guess it was the "cracked tank" comment that got me going as only cracked issue I've had was with coolant tank.  Hope all will accept my  apology.

 

No need to apologize - it is always great to help fellow owners.

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