Jump to content
×
×

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)
Sign in to follow this  
Johnny-5

2000 Tiptronic Cab IMS Bearing and other maintenance item questions....

Recommended Posts

So I'm currently debating if I want to do this myself or if I should get a shop to do this. I'm mechanically inclined to a certain degree but something about Porsche's scare me. Possible how cramped the engine compartment is??? Who knows! I've read here and there how painful the process is and wanted to get some feed back on the process. I'm sure if I take it in I'm going to get reamed on price that's for sure. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

 

Now my other question I had...While were at it is there anything else that should be done? Is it easier getting to the AOS with the transmission removed? I dont have any current issues with it but you never know and while were at it I figured I get that over and done with as well.

 

Thanks in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
    You can remove these ads by becoming a Contributing Member.

I've done a lot of work on cars way back when, and I do most of the work on my 986, but I had the IMS done by an independent shop. The labor was about 2-1/2 to 3 times the amount of what the tools would've cost. For this operation having a warranty was a major deciding factor, especially when weighed against the possible savings available.

 

The "might as wells" included the AOS, RMS, and Trans Fluid/Filter.

 

Also, when a LN Engineering approved shop does the work, they check first to see if the engine is "qualified" for a Retrofit bearing, thus securing the warranty.

 

Lastly, the bearing choices from LN at the time I had mine done were the Single Row Retrofit or the IMS Solution, and I went with the Retrofit since it was about $1,000 less. Anything other than a plain bearing is a maintenance part - it'll need to be done again in the future. Knowing what I know now, I would've gone with the Solution.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, ttocs said:

I've done a lot of work on cars way back when, and I do most of the work on my 986, but I had the IMS done by an independent shop. The labor was about 2-1/2 to 3 times the amount of what the tools would've cost. For this operation having a warranty was a major deciding factor, especially when weighed against the possible savings available.

 

The "might as wells" included the AOS, RMS, and Trans Fluid/Filter.

 

Also, when a LN Engineering approved shop does the work, they check first to see if the engine is "qualified" for a Retrofit bearing, thus securing the warranty.

 

Lastly, the bearing choices from LN at the time I had mine done were the Single Row Retrofit or the IMS Solution, and I went with the Retrofit since it was about $1,000 less. Anything other than a plain bearing is a maintenance part - it'll need to be done again in the future. Knowing what I know now, I would've gone with the Solution.

 

 

I agree 100%, go with the ONLY US patented IMS bearing that will last longer than the life of most of the components on the M96 engine - The IMS Solution! 

Edited by b3freak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, ttocs said:

I've done a lot of work on cars way back when, and I do most of the work on my 986, but I had the IMS done by an independent shop. The labor was about 2-1/2 to 3 times the amount of what the tools would've cost. For this operation having a warranty was a major deciding factor, especially when weighed against the possible savings available.

 

The "might as wells" included the AOS, RMS, and Trans Fluid/Filter.

 

Also, when a LN Engineering approved shop does the work, they check first to see if the engine is "qualified" for a Retrofit bearing, thus securing the warranty.

 

Lastly, the bearing choices from LN at the time I had mine done were the Single Row Retrofit or the IMS Solution, and I went with the Retrofit since it was about $1,000 less. Anything other than a plain bearing is a maintenance part - it'll need to be done again in the future. Knowing what I know now, I would've gone with the Solution.

 

 

Thank you for the recommendations. I'm tempted to try this myself but like you I may just go with a shop. 

 

11 hours ago, b3freak said:

 

I agree 100%, go with the ONLY US patented IMS bearing that will last longer than the life of most of the components on the M96 engine - The IMS Solution! 

 

So I got a question before LN Engineering was the way to go but there seems to be another company I heard nothing but good things on which is EPS which utilizes a cylindrical bearing design which also claims the life of the engine. Anyone tried that company?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Johnny-5 said:

 

Thank you for the recommendations. I'm tempted to try this myself but like you I may just go with a shop. 

 

 

So I got a question before LN Engineering was the way to go but there seems to be another company I heard nothing but good things on which is EPS which utilizes a cylindrical bearing design which also claims the life of the engine. Anyone tried that company?

 

I have no dog in this fight. I'm not going to risk my $20K+ motor on a roller or ball bearing design, IMHO. Everything I've read over the years shows risks from radial load on roller bearings which potentially could lead to failure, but I guess the cylindrical roller bearing is their "solution"? Problems associated with ball bearings is why we're in the this mess in the first place. I believe the IMS solution by LN with it's oil fed plain bearing design is the best technology out there. Why do you think the Mezger engines are so valuable to racing?... one of the reasons is because of it's durability on the track. Those Mezger engines use a plain bearing design on their shafts. 

Edited by b3freak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/10/2018 at 5:48 AM, b3freak said:

 

I have no dog in this fight. I'm not going to risk my $20K+ motor on a roller or ball bearing design, IMHO. Everything I've read over the years shows risks from radial load on roller bearings which potentially could lead to failure, but I guess the cylindrical roller bearing is their "solution"? Problems associated with ball bearings is why we're in the this mess in the first place. I believe the IMS solution by LN with it's oil fed plain bearing design is the best technology out there. Why do you think the Mezger engines are so valuable to racing?... one of the reasons is because of it's durability on the track. Those Mezger engines use a plain bearing design on their shafts. 

 

Sorry for the delay. Thank you for the feedback and valid point. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.