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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/16/2019 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    K44 - Geschwindigkeitsregelanlage = cruise control system. There will undoubtedly be several items that are directly/indirectly related to cruise control, such as speed signal, brake signal, etc.
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  6. 1 point
    Lol, and to think I was expecting a picture of a BMW. Still in the family!
  7. 1 point
  8. 1 point
    In order to see the outside air temp, the car has to have the on board computer option.
  9. 1 point
    Thanks I'll Try That....
  10. 1 point
    Guys, enough with the weird work around Magiver repairs; if you cannot drill the bolt and remove it, you need to drill out the insert and install a new one, but this time put some antiseize on the fasteners and this will never happen again.
  11. 1 point
    On my 07S Cab, I had only one of the problems you listed- driver window drops about an inch but doesn’t come back up when door is closed. I had my dealer fix it. They replaced the control unit at considerable cost. They had to take the door panel off to replace it.
  12. 1 point
    This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time: ~2 hours If you’re getting a Durametric error code P0674, you likely have a bad PCV valve that needs to be replaced. An easy way to test a bad PCV valve is to unscrew the oil fill cap on the engine while it is idling. If you feel suction on the cap and/or the idle fluctuates once the cap is removed then your PCV valve is bad. The PCV valve is built into the valve cover so your options are to buy a whole new valve cover assembly (95510513500- ~$347) or buy just the PCV membrane (aftermarket $20-25) and replace it in your existing valve cover. To get access to the valve cover, you will need to follow this DIY article to remove the intake manifold first. Other reasons to remove the intake manifold are to service your fuel injectors or to make it much easier to replace the thermostat. The thermostat can be changed without removing the intake manifold (I did it twice), however you basically need to be a contortionist to reach the bolts to remove housing and you will scrape some knuckles along the way. Tools Needed: -Flathead screwdriver -Assortment of torx bits (T20, T25, T30, 6” long T30) -Pliers -Torque Wrench -3/8” ratchet set with various extensions and a universal joint -1 1/16” Deep socket -10mm Triple Square Spline Bit -Crescent Wrench -9/16” Open End Wrench -Dental pick Parts Needed: -Brake Booster Vacuum Hose- 95535557941 (your existing hose is probably brittle and will likely crack from removing it, I recommend getting a new one) -Lower Fuel Injector Seal Kit (3X) - 95511091000 (existing seals may be brittle and once you have removed the intake manifold, they may not seal properly upon reinstallation, I recommend getting new ones, need 3 sets) Procedure: First start by removing the plastic covers surrounding the engine. Using a flathead screwdriver, remove the quarter turn plastic trim fasteners. Rotate them in either direction by 90 degrees and pop them out. Be ready to catch them as sometimes they like to jump out. Next you will need to remove the 2 torx screws on either side of the engine cover with a T25 bit and the screw under the windshield washer reservoir cap with a T20 bit. Remove the oil fill cap and front engine cover by pulling straight up. They are held on by friction rings around a stud so pulling straight up will release it. Now that you have the covers removed, it’s time to remove the intake filter box and intake piping. Using your T25 torx bit, rotate the 2 screws until the dot on the screwhead lines up with the lower indication on the filter cover. Now gently use your pliers to pull them straight out. With your flathead screwdriver, pop up the two clips to release the filter housing. Pivot the filter house towards the passenger side of the car and remove it. Remove the engine air filter as well. Next, remove the wiring harness from the MAF sensor located in the middle of the intake piping. Loosen the clamp around the intake piping on the throttle body and gently work the intake piping back and forth until it releases from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt on the engine lift bracket and loosen the lower bolt with your M10 triple square bit. Then pivot the bracket towards the front of the car. Remove the bolt next to the throttle body with your M10 triple square bit. Then unplug the wire harness from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt from the bracket on the passenger side of the engine with your M10 triple square bit. Remove the vacuum lines from the intake manifold on the passenger side of the engine. One hose requires pliers to open the hose clamp, the other can be removed by hand if you squeeze the lock ring around the hose to release it. Next, from the passenger side, reach your hand around to the back side of the engine. There is a vacuum line that goes from the bottom surface of the intake manifold to the brake booster. You will need to pull the vacuum line fitting straight down to pop it out of the intake manifold. I don't have a good picture of it so here is a diagram of it. Pull down on the elbow fitting, not the hose. Also on the back side of the engine just behind the vacuum line you removed there is a bolt that needs to be removed using your M10 triple square bit. You are working blindly so locate the bolt first by feel and guide your bit to the bolt. Remove the 3 screws holding the actuator with a T25 torx bit. Slowly pull it straight out towards the front of the car. There is an actuator arm that attaches to a shaft on the passenger side of the part. Once you have enough clearance to reach your finger in there, you need to slide the arm off the shaft as you pull the entire actuator off. Then disconnect the vacuum hose from the actuator. Now pull the coolant hoses out of their holder in the intake manifold and push it towards the driver side of the car. There is a T25 torx screw that attaches this water hose bracket near the back of the intake manifold. The screw is facing up, so you need to use your T25 torx bit and get creative with removing that screw. I used a crescent wrench to turn the torx bit while holding the torx bit in place with my other hand. With the water hose bracket free, slide the water hose bracket towards the front of the car to release it from the intake manifold. This bracket has a keyhole slot that will release once it's slid forward. Remove the oil dipstick tube bracket with a T25 torx bit. Just push it out of the way once you remove the screw. With your long T30 torx bit, remove the bolt on the intake manifold that was under the actuator. Next, there are 3 blind holes on the driver side of the intake manifold. You need to use your long T30 torx bit to loosen the screws inside those holes. Those 3 screws are captive screws so they will not come out. There are 3 bolts below the intake runners. They need to be removed with your M10 triple square bit. This is where your universal joint will come in handy. The bolt near the rear of the engine required me to use my u-joint with various entensions to acess. At this point, you will hear gas leaking out. Since you have released the pressure from the lower fuel rail to the lower fuel injectors, the pressurized gas in the rail will leak out. Make sure you are working in a well ventilated area. From the driver side of the car, reach behind the engine to remove the wire harness from the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 1 1/16” deep socket, unscrew and remove the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 9/16” open wrench, unscrew the nut that connects the metal fuel line running from the lower fuel rail. The slimmer your wrench the better. My crescent wrench did not fit here. Now that the intake manifold is completely unbolted, you can start to wiggle it free. You will need to lift the manifold up from the passenger side and pivot it up towards the driver side. You will need to wiggle the lower fuel rail loose to release the metal fuel line you just unscrewed the nut from. It is a flare fitting that pushes into the upper fuel rail assembly. Be gentle here as you don’t want to bend the fuel rail. Once the metal fuel line is free from the upper assembly, you can remove the intake manifold as described above by lifting up from the passenger side first to pivot it off. At this point, you have access to the fuel injectors if you need to service them, the thermostat housing and the valve cover. Unbolting the valve cover is straight forward from here if you need to replace the PCV valve, etc. The fuel injector seal kit comes with a rubber o-ring, Teflon o-ring, Teflon sleeve and metal clip. At the bare minimum you should replace the rubber o-ring and Teflon o-ring. Use a dental pick to remove the old o-rings. These 2 parts are the wear surface when you remove/reinstall the intake manifold and are prone to fail if you re-use them. Trust me, I learned the hard way. To install the intake manifold, reverse the steps above. Take care in sliding the lower fuel rail back onto the lower fuel injectors and lining up the metal fuel line back into the flare fitting. I found it was easier to pull the lower fuel line out of the manifold to line the flare fitting up first, then pushing it into place in the intake manifold. You want to apply even pressure on the surface as you tighten all 7 of the bolts down on the driver side. Torque the 3 triple square bolts evenly to 6 ft lbs, torque angle 90 degrees, then a final torque of 22 ft lbs. The bolts holding the engine lift bracket are 17 ft lbs, the other triple square bolts holding the manifold on the head are 15 ft lbs. Once you get it all back together, turn the key to the ON then START position without your foot on the brake. This will run the fuel pumps to build pressure back up in the fuel rail. I removed the key and repeated 2-3 times to get the fuel pressure up. The first time you restart, it may take a couple seconds to fire up due to the fuel pressure needing to build back up. If you replaced your PCV valve, it may idle rough as the ECU needs to remap since it adapted to a leaking PCV valve over time. If you did not replace the fuel injector seals and smell gas/hear it leaking after shutting off the engine, then your seals failed and you need to repeat the procedure and replace those seals.
  13. 1 point
    One of the problems that I see with many 996/986/997/987 owners complaining about is a lumpy or erratic idle and sometimes sluggish acceleration. I have a quick cure for this problem. In fact, this cure will work for any car that has a throttle body. The issue is that over time a sludgy gunk will build up in the throttle body where the throttle butterfly opens and closes. This gunk will eventually change the airflow characteristics of the gap between the butterfly and the throttlebody which will cause the erratic idle. In addition, this gunk can cause the butterfly the stick as it opens which will effect acceleration. The car's DME will compensate for this buildup over time, but if it gets too thick, then the "Throttle Adaption" will reach its limit, and will throw a code. Many times people think that it is the MAF that is bad, when it is just a dirty throttle body. Notice that the butterfly valve is slightly cracked open. This is for the idle airflow, and that crack can get clogged because of the gunk buildup. The solution is to remove the air cleaner box for access to the throttle body, and simply clean the throttle body with spray carburetor cleaner. Open the butterfly valve with your hand, and wipe out all of the gunk on the backside of the valve, and the inside of the throttle body. You will see a dark brown ring inside the throttle body. This is the buildup you want to remove. Take a rag, wet it with carburetor cleaner, and wipe out the gunk. Be sure to get the edge and the back side of the butterfly valve as well. You will know when you are done because the surfaces that you are cleaning are polished, and easy to see if there is stuff left on them. Here is a picture of what your throttle body should look like after it is cleaned. Notice how shinny the inside is. Don't worry if you spray too much in the engine, when you fire the engine up, all of that stuff will burn off in the combustion chamber. Where does the gunk come from? It is residue from the crankcase vent opening that is right there behind the butterfly. The reason it is there is because there is high vacuum there that will suck the crankcase oil vapors back into the combustion process of the car. Over time oil solids will accumulate there and will form a sticky lip around the opening. This cleaning should be part of your 30,000 mile maintenance as a minimum. However if you have never had your throttle body cleaned, try doing this weekend. You will be amazed at how much better your car runs.
  14. 1 point
    Are you sure you don't have fuses mixed up? I'm currently on 1 pump in my CS with fuse 14 pulled and can hear the right side pump running/whinning when the car is on. I think Fuse #14 is for the driver side pump and #13 is the right pass side pump, but feel free to correct me If I'm wrong USA
  15. 1 point
    Removing and installing drive belt - Cayenne Turbo Removal 1. Remove the front engine compartment cover. 2. Pull the cover of the throttle body vertically upwards. 3. Pull off the electrical plugs on the throttle adjuster 1 and unclip the cable. Then pull off the plug on the boost pressure sensor 2. Twist the two fastening bolts 3 through approx. ca. 45° in an counter-clockwise direction and pull out the bolts. 4. Loosen the hose clamps to the left and right on the bellows and pull off the bellows. 5. Pull off the Y pipe from the throttle body and pull off the hose on the Y pipe. To do this, press the button and pull off the hose. 6. Unclip lines underneath the Y pipe and remove the middle section. 7.Undo intake manifold on the air cleaner cover. To do this, turn the two fastening bolts through 180° and pull the bolts out in an upward direction. Then pull out the intake manifolds. 8. Remove the air line on the right air cleaner cover. To do this, unclip the green cap. Insert a screwdriver into the notch of the cap and lever the cap off. 9. Push the snap ring into the flange 1 and then pull it off together with the flange 2. 10. Clip the green cap on again after disassembly. 11. The coolant bleeder hose on the coolant expansion tank should be unclipped from the air cleaner housing cover of the cylinder bank 1 − 4. 12. Remove the air cleaner covers. To do so, loosen each of the two fastening clips on the top side and remove the cover from the engine compartment in an upward direction.<br> 13. Loosen the two fastening screws of the pressure pipes on the lock support. Note: Depending on the routing, the electrical cable belonging to the fans may have to be disconnected on the left side and laid to one side in order to access the fastening screws of the Y pipe. 14. Disconnect the electrical plug of the electric fan. 15. To do so, loosen the hose clamp on the bottom of the left hot film mass air flow meter and remove the component from the engine compartment. 16. To do this, loosen the two hexagon socket head bolts (a/f 5) of the pressure pipes. 17. Remove the two pressure pipes from the vehicle. 18. Disconnect the positive crankcase ventilation line 1 and the control lead 2 of the bypass valves on the disconnection point under the left deflection roller. 19. Mark the direction of movement of the drive belt with chalk. 20. Relieve and remove drive belt. To do this, use an open−ended wrench (a/f 30) to turn the belt tensioner clockwise and remove the drive belt from the tensioning roller. Relieve the belt tensioner slowly. 21. Remove the drive belt from all pulleys. Installation Note: The following diagram illustrates the complete belt threading course. The pulleys are numbered according to the sequence of fitting. 1. Make the belt into a loop and place over the crankshaft belt pulley behind the dipstick. 2. Place the top part of the belt loop over the coolant pump pulley 1. 3. Place the lower part of the belt loop around the crankshaft belt pulley at the bottom 2. 4. Guide the belt section from the coolant pump around the deflector wheel 3 on cylinder bank 5 − 8. 5. Then guide the section of the belt around the air conditioning compressor belt pulley 4 at the bottom. 6. Then lay a loop around the power pump 5. 7. Lay the loose end of the drive belt from the coolant pump downwards and around the generator belt pulley 6 and deflector roller 7 of cylinder bank 1 − 4. 8. Gather the belt section between the deflector roller of cylinder bank 1 − 4 and the crankshaft belt pulley to form a loop and guide it upwards to the tensioning roller 8. Use a wrench (a/f 30) to turn the tensioning roller 8 clockwise at the hexagon clockwise and put on the drive belt. Slowly relieve the tensioning roller. Fitting the drive belt 9. Check that the drive belt is positioned correctly on the pulleys. 10. Join the positive crankcase ventilation line 1 and the control lead 2 of the bypass valves on the disconnection point under the left deflection roller. 11. Insert the pressure pipe parts of the Y pipe into the charge air cooler to the left and right and tighten the two fastening screws to 10 Nm (7.5 ftlb.). 12. Install the left hot film mass air flow meter. Position the lower hose clamp and tighten it. Then connect the electrical plug. 13. Press the control lead on the bottom of the tubular pieces into the two fastening clips. 14. Connect the cables for the electric fans and clip into the holders. 15. Tighten the holders of the tubular pieces on the lock support. 16. Install the air cleaner covers. To do this, close the two fastening clips on the top side. 17. The coolant bleeder hose and the coolant overflow hose must be clipped back onto the cylinder bank 1 − 4 on the air cleaner housing. 18. Push the air suspension line onto the right air cleaner cover. 19. Press in the intake manifold on the air cleaner in the air cleaner cover. Then insert the two fastening bolts and turn them through 180°. 20. Press the rubber T-piece into the plastic clip on the underside of the Y pipe. Then fit the hose at the bottom. 21. Attach the line to the underside of the Y pipe. 22. Slide the Y pipe onto the throttle body. Insert the two fastening bolts 3 and turn them clockwise through 45°. Fit the electrical plug for the boost pressure sensor 2 and the electrical plug for the throttle adjuster 3. 23. Slide the bellows onto the tubular pieces to the left and right and tighten the hose clamps. 24. Press the four rubber elements in the cover onto the four ball socket holders. The fastening elements must be felt to engage. 25. Install front engine compartment cover.
  16. 1 point
    Some pictures for anyone that was interested............
  17. 1 point
    Hi I ordered a PIWIS 2 kit a couple of weeks ago. I finally got round today to connecting it to car and having a play around for the first time and familiarising myself with the menus and functions. Ran through all the headings 1. Fault Memory 2. Actual Values input signals 3. Drive Links checks 4. Coding Adaptations 5. Maintenance repairs and 6. Programming. And then I made a mistake, I was about to finish and out of curiosity I on the programming menu I selected Auto programming and ran it. It starting running but then the installation aborted. The cars modules seemed to have decoded itself. The electric rear spoiler retracted and what I can assume is the cooling fans are constantly on when the car ignition or engine is switched on. I’ve rerun the scan but cannot see any modules on the car and I seem to have accidently wiped the modules. I have spent the remainder of today going through every single menu/option on the PIWIS to try and recode but have had not success in recoding/programming the modules back (I don’t even have a working instrument cluster although the car engine starts and drives) Does anyone have any advice on how I rectify this? I have a 2009 997.2
  18. 1 point
    Yes, a real experienced Porsche alignment shop can do wonders. I was very pleased to find that after all my careful work measuring and re-measuring the ride heights and balancing F/R relationship, etc, that my shop said they did not have to adjust the height at all, to make the X74 alignment specs I wanted, and matched their recommendation. I had to of course do a coarse alignment after installing the PSS9s, and thought the difference in handling from stock was quite incredible. I could never go back to the stock suspension, it really is, to over use the phrase, "night and day". But the smoothness and neutrality of the handling, the way she handled after the alignment, was similar to yours, a major improvement. I had only waited so long to get it done as I was waiting for the opportunity to put on new N3 PS2's before spending $200 on the alignment, and that was well worth it IMHO.
  19. 1 point
    Please RSVP in the Community calendar and PM me if you have any questions: http://www.renntech....ara-california/ Alright, if you have been putting off that oil change, want to learn how to work on your car, or cringe at the though of putting a wrench to that fine instrument you drive- fear not. I am organizing a Work on Cars day in Santa Clara. We will have access to a Porsche race shop that will provide us a nice, clean work space. WHEN: Saturday Dec 10th TIME: 9am-? WHERE: Elephant Racing 625 Nuttman Street Santa Clara, CA 95054 PARTS: You can order parts from the site sponsor by emailing them at porscheatcost@sunsetimports.com or your favorite parts supplier Last-Minute Parts: I have arranged Saturday access to a local dealership parts department from 10am-2pm for any forgotten or last minute parts/supplies needed Due to low RSVP count, the parts arrangements have been cancelled. THINGS TO CONSIDER BRINGING: Hand tools Jack/Jack stands PIWIS/PST2/Durametric Portable Chair Lunch (I will bring a grill for those that want to BBQ) Catch pan (for those doing oil/coolant changes) Empty milk jugs for taking used fluids away (don't plan on disposing of them there) creeper or packing blanket (something comfortable while working on your car) ITEMS TO CONSIDER DOING: [Please budget enough time to finish just in case you plan a full engine teardown] Suspension upgrades Bumper removal for radiator cleaning Oil Change Water Pump Motor Mounts Serpentine Belt Air Filter Coolant Reservoir Alternator change Third Radiator install 4th stalk install (On-Board Computer) Replace horns (requires bumper removal) Headlight replacement Smoked/Clear side marker/tailight swap iPod/iPhone cable install on head unit Window regulator replacement GT3 front brake air duct upgrade Antenna TSB for greater remote range Transmission/Differential gear oil change ... LIST OF AVAILABLE TOOLS: Genuine Porsche oil filter tool Radio removal tools Low profile jack Jack stands Basic assortment of metric wrenches/sockets Internal Torx sockets Allen Sockets UView Airlift 55000 (used to replace coolant via vacuum) [PLEASE POST IF YOU HAVE ANY SPECIAL TOOLS YOU PLAN TO BRING AND I WILL UPDATE THE LIST]
  20. 1 point
    I've found no appreciable difference with them in. The center plexiglass windscreen, however, does make a big difference.
  21. 1 point
    Thanks for the replies. When I bought the centre piece, it definitely made a big difference. I had my doubts about the mesh pieces. They are meshes for starters, and also they fit just behind the seat which doesn't make much sense. I will probably save my money on this one then.
  22. 1 point
    :welcome: Search is your friend... Carbon Canister removal is here
  23. 1 point
    Well - more fun last night trying to resolve this problem. When I opened the top the same problem happened - stopped about two inches away from being complete. I found that the plastic shield that is connected to the rearmost strut on the driver's side and carries a wire had become disconnected from the strut - but reattaching the plastic shield made no difference. I looked at all the little wings and flaps and they all look fine, i.e., the left and right sides are in the same position, and there is nothing obviously fouling the clamshell. I joggled the clamshell a little and did manage to get it to close - but only once. I'm nervous about too much joggling seeing so interconnected this whole system is. So...I'm now thinking that some mechanical resistance has developed that the clamshell motor is not able to overcome - but this does not seem to jibe with the fact that the clamshell closes fine when going into the "roof closed" position.
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