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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/29/2020 in Posts

  1. First of all, LN Engineering's IMS Solution is a LOT more than just an oil feed line; the bearing insert is a solid bearing (no moving parts) with annular oil passages just like the almighty Mezger turbo engines used, the IMS shaft is plugged to prevent oil accumulation and the balance problems associated by running the shaft full of oil, the replacement rear IMS flange is coated with a Diamond like coating for strength and longevity, and the oil feed is sourced at the oil filter to get clean, cool oil rather than where some others have sourced it. Perhaps one of the biggest advantages of the
    2 points
  2. I would first check the one you have to make sure it is not blocked from air flow by debris.
    2 points
  3. Yes. I think most on forum would agree. Right, Jeff? Like replacing the old sealed hydraulic chain tensioners with oil pressure tensioners. (That’s for those of us who might have had an air-cooled 911.). I think LE calls it “the solution.”
    1 point
  4. I don’t intend to start the “tire wars” up again, but I ran on Michelin PS2’s year round. It’s not a winter tire, not m+s rated, but rated aa and great in wet weather. 295/30 on the back.
    1 point
  5. Front: 235/40ZR x 18 Rear: 295/30ZR x 18 These worked fine on my car (MY99 996 Coupe). My front wheels were 8" not the stock 7.5". I do not think you can go any wider on the front and very little on the rear.
    1 point
  6. Just received a breakout box with some leads to complete my set of 996 vintage tool 😉 I've been using a PST2 since 2008 with a lot of success. Especially for friends that are looking to buy a use 996 turbo or simple troubleshooting and keys reprogramming.... But I never used a breakout box before and it is difficult to found information about how to use this tool especially on Porsche. Would like to test the internal voltmeter/ohmeter (URI) of the Bosch KTS500....OBDII pinout, 16 ports on the breakout box ? 6 leads, + ground (black) red and blue wires etc....Is there, somewhere, printed info t
    1 point
  7. No, it is located on the fuel rail and is a mechanical device. The ignition switch is a cheap electrical part of the key assembly that requires no programing to replace. It is a pain to access, but controls ALL electrical functions in the car: A DIY how to here: How to change 996 ignition switch electrical section Be sure to buy the factory part, aftermarket versions are notoriously bad..............
    1 point
  8. Sorry, but the 2002-2004 Boxster S engine was a 3.2L, not a 3.6L. later models got a 3.4L engine, but there were no 3.6L M96/97 Boxsters from the factory, although there was a 3.8L 9A1 engine in 2015-2016 "Spyder" model. You can interchange 3.2 and 3.4 cylinder heads within certain bounds and caveats: Both engines need to have the same cam drive systems (chain styles and number of chains varied over model years). 986 1997–1999 2.5 L (2,480 cc) 204 PS (150 kW; 201 bhp) 245 N⋅m (181 lbf⋅ft) water-cooled DOHC 24-valve Boxer flat-six "M96.20" 2000–2002 2.7 L (2,68
    1 point
  9. "If two batteries are fitted to the vehicle (main battery and backup battery), these are connected or disconnected to the bus bar in the power distributor through a relay. The switching of the two batteries is controlled independent of the load management (function is integrated in the vehicle electrical system control unit). The starter relay of the 2nd battery is actuated parallel to the starter relay. That means for every start the starter is supplied from both batteries. The backup battery is disconnected from the vehicle electrical system when the engine is switched off and then supplies
    1 point
  10. It doesn't need to be left open, simply buy a quality battery maintainer like Ctek, plug it into your cigarette lighter socket, run the cord out thru the cut out in the bottom of the driver's door (there for this exact purpose), and let the car sit for months (locked with the alarm on) without any issues.
    1 point
  11. Engine number is on the drivers side next to the oil sump pan...like this. You are correct. 2000 was a transition year for the IMSB from the dual row bearing to the smaller single row bearing. As far as I know, on a 2000, there is no way to know whether it has a dual row or single row bearing by using the engine number. If it were me, I would just plan on having the LN IMS Solution installed as soon as possible. No sense in pulling the bearing and replacing with another bearing that will need to replaced again in 36-40K miles.
    1 point
  12. I would use circuit board cleaner on the board but be careful as old rubberized buttons can tear with rough cleaning.
    1 point
  13. My key stopped working over 10 years ago. Does not work to lock/unlock car. New battery in key fob did nothing, however the key fob red light does blink. It just doesn't communicate with the car. I figure the key circuit board is broken based on what I have read. Been using the manual key in the door lock ever since. No problem.
    1 point
  14. Also, worn out buttons or dirt inside the keyhead.
    1 point
  15. It is a fire rated wire clamp holding in one direction only using a toothed surface, patented in 2001 and held by Gripple Ltd., and agricultural fencing and equipment company in Sheffield England. 😉
    1 point
  16. P000C - DME DFI) control unit Possible fault causes - Dynamic driving style when oil level is near minimum (oil foaming) - Solenoid valve for hydraulic camshaft adjustment faulty (e.g. mechanical fault or dirt (oil circuit) ) - Engine oil pressure too low (e.g. oil thinning, oil thickening, wrong oil quality, oil pressure control or oil pump faulty) - Camshaft adjustment faulty - Intake camshaft stuck
    1 point
  17. What you should be doing is running a voltage drop across the primary cables; anything more than 0.5 V means the cables need to be replaced.
    1 point
  18. Porsche has gone rather stiff necked about adding options post delivery. If memory serves, you have to have the clock, and pay Porsche to recode the car as having both. Most dealers seem to charge the exact amount you would have laid out to have it as a factory option. Not a pretty situation, but then you are dealing with Porsche...…...
    1 point
  19. Welcome to RennTech The MAF is located in the air intake system. Trace yours and you will find it sticking out.
    1 point
  20. Probably the axel flange seals going bad.
    1 point
  21. I can't help with photos, but these diagrams show where the wire is connected at the steering column, and where it runs to on the DME (via a plug/socket).
    1 point
  22. News to me... the only big confusing issue that I know of is the bad engine ground (splice) that caused all sorts of erroneous faults. But there was a TSB with instructions of how to fix that. Any combination of faults for the sensors listed may indicate this ground splice is broken or faulty. Mass air flow implausible (P0068) Intake Manifold pressure sensor (P0069, P0106, P0107, P0108, P1183, P1184) Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor faults (P0116_P0119, P050C, P3081, P3082) Radiator exit Coolant Temperature Sensor faults (P2183_P2186) System too Lean or too Rich (Bank 1 & Bank 2)
    1 point
  23. You could use -47, or -53, or -55, or -61. All will still require Durametric or Porsche PST2 or PIWIS tester for specialized bleeding of the new (or used) unit.
    1 point
  24. Short circuit to voltage between pin 2 of booster pump pressure sensor plug and PSM control module plug pin 26 → End. If you can not find a wiring connector issue then you will likely need to replace the hydraulic unit.
    1 point
  25. For me, to work around the compressor lines and engine temp sensor, a wobble or flex socket adapter does the trick. Coupled with the right size socket (can't be too deep or too fat). What has worked well on that rear bolt is a small 1/4" drive 13mm socket (not too fat or too deep, but fits snugly onto the bolt and pretty much butts up right against the A/C lines), plugged into a 1/4" flex socket, plugged into a 3/8" adapter, plugged into a 3/8" extension and finnally into the wrench poking out just above the intake.
    1 point
  26. Twinturbofan and chappcc, Did you check these probable causes? Fault code 4460 -- Pressure sensor Possible cause of fault - Short circuit to ground/voltage or open circuit in circuit to control module terminals 25, 26 and 42 - Plug connection on stop light switch faulty - Adjustment of the stop light switch not OK - Wiring/ plug connection faulty - Pressure sensor faulty (replace hydraulic unit)
    1 point
  27. Fault code 4460 -- Pressure sensor Possible cause of fault - Short circuit to ground/voltage or open circuit in circuit to control module terminals 25, 26 and 42 - Plug connection on stop light switch faulty - Adjustment of the stop light switch not OK - Wiring/ plug connection faulty - Pressure sensor faulty (replace hydraulic unit)
    1 point
  28. A few points to add from a '99 Cabrio owner in Central Florida. I ran into a couple snags, and wanted to pass my info along in the hopes it'll help someone else out there, and you can plan your weekend morning accordingly. 1. Finding the Right Fluid -- Wasn't as easy as I'd hoped. I went to the two major car part store chains in my area (AutoZone and Discount/Advance Auto Parts) and didn't have any luck finding either John Deere or Pentosin fluid. Ended up going to Bennett Auto Parts (on my way to Tractor Supply, which I assumed had the John Deere) and it turned out Bennett had it and carrie
    1 point
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