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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/11/2019 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    A couple of days ago my head unit started cycling off and on every minute or so. I found some posts that these things are notorious for failing so I started looking for a place that would repair it. Luckily I found the Becker office in Saddle Brook NJ, called them, and they emailed me instructions how to fix it. Apparently my XM SAT provider caused the problem. It required a reboot as per below: WARNING It was brought to our attention, that the PCM 3.0 and 3.1 units have been rebooting continuously on a number of Porsche vehicles at the moment. It seems that a signal was sent by SiriusXM which has caused this issue. SiriusXM and Porsche are investigating currently and are working on a fix. VERY Important: Please DO NOT replace any parts or hardware on a vehicle, due to this issue. In order to rectify this issue, you will perform a “PCM handover” (also known as a PCM Hard Reset). Instructions are listed below; Press and hold the PCM>>Info button for approximately 10 seconds until the PCM reboots. Immediately select the following from the PCM; CAR>>OPTION>>Set PCM System>>Reset PCM>>Vehicle Handover>>Yes>>Yes These instructions can also be found in the respective Owner’s Manuals for affected vehicles. Hopefully this may prevent Dealership / workshop visits. If your vehicle is already at the workshop, recommend that the technician update it to the latest available software level. **PLEASE NOTE: Performing a PCM Hard Reset will also erase all of the radio presets and Bluetooth connections and these will have to be reentered by you after the reset.** In order to rectify this issue, you will perform a “PCM handover” (also known as a PCM Hard Reset). Instructions are listed below; Press and hold the PCM>>Info button for approximately 10 seconds until the PCM reboots. Immediately select the following from the PCM; CAR>>OPTION>>Set PCM System>>Reset PCM>>Vehicle Handover>>Yes>>Yes WARNING Reboot for PCM 3.1.docx WARNING Reboot for PCM 3.1.pdf
  2. 2 points
    OK, first of all, either twisting wires together and wrapping them with tape, or using wire nuts is totally unacceptable for automotive applications. Both are pathways to shorts and even fires. Wires should be reconnected with crimp connectors at a minimum, with soldering them and then using heat shrink tubing to cover the soldered joints the actual preferred method. Most likely, in the process of doing this swap, you disturbed something, but exactly what is hard to say, particularly as the previous owner used the twisted wire and tape wrap method of connecting things. It is entirely possible that you may have pulled another such "MacGyver" like repair loose that is not related to the radio swap. Probably the best approach at this juncture is to get the vehicle scanned with a Porsche specific scan tool to see what the various communication modules are doing. Good luck with this one.
  3. 2 points
    Hi guys, I bought my 1999 Porsche 911 C4 Tiptronic back in January and I've been doing little projects on it ever since. I used to have a 2016 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack with a 6.4 liter V8 that I traded in last summer, but I was missing the sports car feeling too much so decided to buy the Porsche. One of the things that stood out to me on the test drive was just how sluggish and unresponsive the Tiptronic gearbox felt compared to the one I had in the Dodge. Since the rest of the car was in very good condition (invoices for every oil change & repair going back to 2003, IMS bearing changed, etc.) I decided to buy it anyway, assuming I would get used to having to mash my foot into the carpet everytime I wanted the thing to move. Looking through this forum and others, I heard about the Sprint Booster and how it might help with this problem. For those of you that don't know what this is, it is a small plug that sits between the gas pedal and the cable harness running to the ECU and that changes the signal sent to the car from the position of the gas pedal. The factory set up makes it so that when you push the gas pedal, the revs rise very slowly for the first 50% of pedal travel. I think I read somewhere that halfway down, the pedal will only give you about 25% of the power. This means that in order to get the Tiptronic box to do a downward shift, you really REALLY have to mash the pedal and do it in a quick manner. In general it makes the whole car feel unresponsive and not at all like the free-revving, happy sports car I thought I was getting. The Sprint Booster module (which only works on cars with electronic throttle control or "e-gas" pedal) will take the gas pedal input and modulate it to reflect a more aggressive pedal action. The only thing that changes really is the voltage that is sent to the car's ECU, and how this is calculated in relationship to the position of the gas pedal. The unit comes with a little control gadget where you can set it to one of three basic settings - Factory (simple pass-through, nothing changes from stock), Sport (about a 30% more aggressive response), and Race (about 50% more aggressive). Within both Sport and Race you can then fine tune with an additional setting from 1-9 for each of the two categories. By default the device will put you in "5" or the middle ground. The device costs you about $300 and there is no discount to be had from any of your typical market places. I simply bought mine directly at the manufacturer's website. Since it was my birthday last week, I decided to treat myself and see if it might work. You have a 30-day money back guarantee and the install process is completely reversible, so I figured I'd give it a go. If it actually helps make my tiptronic feel peppy it will have been worth every penny. If not, I'll just return it. For the installation my first problem was figuring out if my particular car had an e-gas or electronic throttle system or not. Looking at the gas pedal I can see a cable running up the bulkhead so I wasn't feeling too optimistic. With the help of others on this forum, I learned that all 996's have e-gas except the 98-99 C2. I also popped the hood and looked at the throttle body itself. To be extra sure, I also asked the vendor to confirm that my particular model would work with the product. The manufacturer's website only shows MY 2000 and beyond as approved for installation, but they came back and confirmed that in fact the -99 C4 does have e-gas and so I could proceed with the purchase. 3-4 days later I get the box in the mail. It is a tiny little thing and doesn't appear to be much for the $300 I paid for it, but whatever. The installation manual shows pictures of the device being plugged into a port located somewhere on the gas pedal assembly itself. It is clearly the most common spot for most manufacturers to link the throttle to the ECU, but that's not the case in a Porsche 996. The gas pedal pulls on a cable and if you follow the cable up from the pedal, you'll see it attaching to a metal box conveniently located under the actual dashboard, and at an impossible angle for any human being to get to. In these cases I like to resort to child labor, so I bribed my 13-year old son to help me. By laying upside down in the driver's seat and sticking his head + one arm under the dashboard, he was able to get the device plugged in correctly in as little as 2 hours. I was basically reduced to cheer leader, and voice of reason to guide his efforts. We made use of my cell phone camera to try and figure out from the pictures how to disconnect the old plug and get the new Sprint Booster in place. The pictures attached to this post will show you how we figured it out: The entire installation process is done by touch and feel as you cannot see any of the components directly. I would recommend our approach of using a camera, talking about what we need to do next, and then use your fingers & imagination to figure out what it is that you are doing. We found it helpful to start with where the cable attaches to the box, then run your fingers over until you hit the little metal flange that sticks out with the white plastic butt underneath it. When you have your hand there you know that the plug itself is just above it. After the initial installation we immediately took the vehicle out for a ride. The gas pedal felt weird, and we had intermittent revving and a noticeable delay when pressing the pedal. I figured it was simply down to the device having to calibrate itself so we went for a ride. 20 minutes in we get a check engine light come on so we headed back to the garage. Ever the optimist, I simply disconnected the battery to reset the CEL and then went out for another drive. This second time it worked beautifully! The car felt like a different animal all together, and the gas response was crisp and immediate. Problem solved, or so I thought, and we called it a day. The second day I went for a drive and got not only a CEL but also the PSM and ABS warning lights. At this time I was ready to call it a day and send the device back since I don't want to have to deal with buggy electronics or stuff that I can't trust. Called up the son again to have him pull everything out and that's when he noticed that the OEM male connector at the end came lose by simply touching it. Turns out we hadn't been able to plug it in all the way until it latched onto the Sprint Booster module. I guess it is not manufactured to the same tight spec as the OEM stuff, and by a fraction of a millimeter the plug can't go in far enough to secure it with the latches. Using force and patience, we eventually managed to push it all the way in until we heard the very satisfying "click" of the plug latching onto the module. If I have to take it off again because it comes loose, I will certainly use a file to remove a bit of material on each latch and ensure that they lock into place without having to push too hard. Since this point I have driven the car 4-5 times and about 50 miles, driving it as I usually do and without holding back in any way. No CEL or other warning lights and the thing runs really well. Having tried the different settings, I have decided to leave it in Sport-5 which I think is a happy medium for a sporty feel without compromising the ability to drive smoothly when you want to. Race mode makes it more binary, and it is like mashing the pedal at every stop light. It might be fun on a track, but for everyday driving it is just too aggressive. In Sport-5 it'll pull away softly in 2nd gear like it did with the factory settings, but if you simply give the pedal a little shove it'll immediately downshift to 1st gear and take off with gusto. All in all I have to say that this was very much worth it. The car feels different - more sporty and responsive, just like you'd want a Porsche to feel like. I know this doesn't add any power to the engine but just by having the Tiptronic gearbox work more like a modern sports car it really changes everything. I'm now planning on driving it for the full 30-day money back period, and if I run into any issue I will post an update to this forum. Cheers, Magnus Update - April 22nd, 2020: I've now driven with the Sprint Booster for 6 weeks and I can honestly say that this was the best bang for the buck modification that I've done to my Porsche. I would rate my Alpine head unit & speaker system upgrade as the mod that I most appreciate, but that was $2,400 and this was only $300. Just be careful with the installation and count on it being a PITA...
  4. 2 points
    You should not have to - unless you hooked up the new battery backwards. If the polarity was hooked up correctly then you need to start looking for poor grounds. Starting with the battery cable then chassis grounds.
  5. 2 points
    Welcome to RennTech On cabriolets, the number 2 relay panel is mounted to the rear of the roll over protection frame. You need to put the top in the "service" position to gain access to it.
  6. 2 points
    Are you sure you don't have fuses mixed up? I'm currently on 1 pump in my CS with fuse 14 pulled and can hear the right side pump running/whinning when the car is on. I think Fuse #14 is for the driver side pump and #13 is the right pass side pump, but feel free to correct me If I'm wrong USA
  7. 1 point
  8. 1 point
    That is perfect , many thanks. As you said the 2" one will be too small meaning i would need to make an adaptor spacer to take up the difference , the 2 5/8" (67mm) looks like it will be too large to fit into the bezel so i can rule that out as i am not butchering a new (expensive) panel. Thanks again. Regards - Kenny
  9. 1 point
    I'm pretty sure the 2" opening will be too small. Here are two pictures taken from the front, but without removing the panel, I can't verify. Let me know if you need me to do that.
  10. 1 point
    Hi there - moving from air cooled to a new to me 2002 white w/natural grey Interior. It’s mainly original with GT2 wheels size, offset, and tire sizes, fab speed exhaust, assuming an ECU tune of some sort (it hits .9 bar consistently), Billet diverter valves. For options it’s a tip, full carbon, full leather interior, three spoke wheel, dual electric seats, Bose sound system, and aero option. It’s got 44k miles and appears to have been well kept. I’ve had the wheels re-powder coated gloss gunmetal (from satin black), new tires (fronts were from 2006 :-)), and I’ve reconstructed the carbon dash pieces and side ac vents. Im chasing down a parasitic current draw and think I have it isolated to the radio but not 100%. Just started that process and I’m sure I will have questions. . I plan to do oil and trans fluids and probably new front disks and pads. It’s a pretty amazing performance car and I’m excited to own and work on. My last three Porsche were 86 Carrera, 70 914-6, and 67 912-6 (which paid for this one). Love the great AC and modern convenience of this car + brute strength...
  11. 1 point
    Thanks, I will have a go during lock-down, gives me something to do!
  12. 1 point
    Good info. Thanks. I was able to find a recently salvaged 996 with 23000 miles for $7000... I’m going to roll the dice. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
    Anyone wanting to rebuild this engine would first need to have the cases re-sleeved, which is going to set you back a ton of $, and then you would need to drop another $10-12K to just do a stock style rebuild. Something like this would not be for the faint of heart or wallet.......................
  15. 1 point
    While the vehicle may contain VW parts, some of them are running Porsche software, which the VCDS cannot even see. Sometimes these modules drop offline when there is a water short, assuming it is not totally dead, the PIWIS should be able to see and communicate with the module, bringing it back online so it can be calibrated. If the PIWIS cannot communicate, you will need a new module, which will need to be coded to the vehicle, which the PIWIS can also do. Just remember, the 911 and Boxster vehicles also carry VW components, but the VCDS is useless with them.
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
    Clear Marker Lenses - Full proceedure with pictures All - Thought I would contribute to the board with an easy starter project that has been detailed before in text but no real picture instructions. Unfortunately, i could not upload the larger resolution images do to board constraints. NOTE - lens were ordered from bumperplugs.com > good communication and fast shipping. (Sorry for spelling errors ) Enjoy! Author roxboxxx Category Cayenne (9PA, 9PA1) - Accessories Submitted 10/08/2008 06:11 PM  
  18. 1 point
  19. 1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    I found a neat program that puts the 987 Chrono on your computer desktop. It displays the time and temp. I am also working on getting the workshop manuals to add to the 987 Basic Workshop manuals and 2005 wiring diagrams I have in electronic format. If you are interested email me or PM me Thank you
  22. 1 point
  23. 1 point
    I agree with Pierre; a large expense with little benefit.
  24. 1 point
    No, you can't switch them. Once the immobiliser code has been programmed into a KESSY/PAS control unit, it can't be over-written with a PIWIS tester. You might want to try an automotive electronics repairer, to see if they can write the immobiliser code directly to the eeprom. I have heard of that being done, but have no experience.
  25. 1 point
    996 Ignition Switch replace (just the switch) with pictures First off - thanks to everyone who has been down this road before me for providing tips and suggestions and troubleshooting regarding this common problem. I have been dealing with a key that would stay all the way to the right upon starting meaning that the A/C, heated seats and some other items would not function. My solution had been to simply start the car and then just move the key back one notch to the left and everything worked fine. So if others have that issue, my original solution Author scb71 Category Carrera (996) - Common Fixes and Repairs Submitted 09/16/2009 01:31 PM Updated 03/13/2017 05:24 AM  
  26. 1 point
  27. 1 point
    The booster should have a check valve ,,, now ON my jeep when it died it made a guinea pig whistling noise..
  28. 1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. 1 point
    Yes, that is the seal and the cam tool set.
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
  33. 1 point
    Kessy module is under the dash just up above the accelerator pedal. I think the module next to the rear comfort control module is the level control module?
  34. 1 point
    Both are for getting into restricted spaces, and can be great time and knuckle savers, but there are other ways to skin this cat....
  35. 1 point
    I now have it in for diagnosis at a reputable Porsche shop.
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
  38. 1 point
    It depends how much. Top bar of the readout flashing? Or worse? Removing the oil filter and replacing will take out an amount to fix a small overfill. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  39. 1 point
  40. 1 point
  41. 1 point
    I think Jose is meaning the hex nut inside the car under the headliner that is holding on the anchor plate. You can see the anchor plate and the bolt that goes inside the car in my second photo at the top. I can't recall the size of the allen/hex key (it was 12 years ago, amazingly), but I do remember it was large. Depends on your hand size (!), but it was probably about the thickness of my little finger. Greg
  42. 1 point
    Hi. Why go back, is my first question? What head unit do you have? If you want to go back to Porsche head unit, you are talking big $$$$. My Boxster head unit doesnt spit out CD's, a rebuilt repalcement unit is around $3200 + installation. Plus it depends on how the current head unit was installed, wiring-wise? Do you have a Bose system?
  43. 1 point
  44. 1 point
    Welcome to RennTech We see a lot of cars that are anywhere from slightly overfilled to way overfilled with oil. These engine’s do not appreciate this and can respond by occasional smoke outbreaks. We always keep our customer’s cars 1-2 bars below the top line, and every car that passes through the shop gets their crankcase vacuum level checked; if the show more than 5 inches of water when fully warmed up, they are a candidate for a new AOS, which can also cause the infamous Porsche smokescreen.
  45. 1 point
    Hi I ordered a PIWIS 2 kit a couple of weeks ago. I finally got round today to connecting it to car and having a play around for the first time and familiarising myself with the menus and functions. Ran through all the headings 1. Fault Memory 2. Actual Values input signals 3. Drive Links checks 4. Coding Adaptations 5. Maintenance repairs and 6. Programming. And then I made a mistake, I was about to finish and out of curiosity I on the programming menu I selected Auto programming and ran it. It starting running but then the installation aborted. The cars modules seemed to have decoded itself. The electric rear spoiler retracted and what I can assume is the cooling fans are constantly on when the car ignition or engine is switched on. I’ve rerun the scan but cannot see any modules on the car and I seem to have accidently wiped the modules. I have spent the remainder of today going through every single menu/option on the PIWIS to try and recode but have had not success in recoding/programming the modules back (I don’t even have a working instrument cluster although the car engine starts and drives) Does anyone have any advice on how I rectify this? I have a 2009 997.2
  46. 1 point
    The Boxster has 6 drains to check. They are black and look like little donuts or grommets. There are 2 in the front on either side of the battery and 4 in the back. Raise your clamshell and you will see one at the bottom on either side of the black plastic liner. Easily seen when you have the top part way open and there's also one on either side of the channel almost below the front tip of the clamshell by the door jam. Here is a link to Mike Focke's website with more info regarding Boxster drains. https://sites.google.com/site/mikefocke2/drainsdiagram
  47. 1 point
    Here is what it cost me to have both fobs and keys replaced and programmed... Purchased 2 key blades cut for my car (keysinthepost.com) ~25.00 shipped 1 fob from ebay ~ 120.00 shipped 1 fob from dealer ~ 200.00 Dealer program 2 fobs - $65.00 List of IPAS codes for my car- FREE
  48. 1 point
    991-631-155-02 Direction Indicator Light (left) -- US MSRP $32.74 991-631-156-02 Direction Indicator Light (right) -- US MSRP $32.74 Your bulb should already be white so just change out the lens/socket assembly.
  49. 1 point
    Install special order parts on top Bow; Rework Bow adjust fit of top, adjust frame to body fit. Part 987-561-927-00 F-kit felt strip. I have no problems with the top since this was done, no noise at all, and as it has been summer it has been up and down a lot of times. I should look to see exactly what it is they changed.
  50. 1 point
    I found my rattle, and I killed it around the rear cat, on the side where it has the 70ish degree bend, there are 2 pieces of steel welded around the bend, these pieces float around the pipe and are only welded to the canister, using a rotozip and a metal cutting wheel I cut through the welds and removed these pieces, the canister and pipe are still 100% intact the weld on the inside of the bend (the smaller weld) was broken, and this is what would rattle as it heated up, now there's no rattle at all and the car sounds very different... I forgot what it was supposed to sound like
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