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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/23/2020 in Posts

  1. Some after photos... Definitely took more time cleaning than building this motor....
    3 points
  2. The headlights look fine to me.... people obsessing over headlights and BS like that are what makes the 996TT still one of the best cars out there, pound-for-pound, dollar-for-dollar
    3 points
  3. You can get a set of small "ez out" hex bits, one of which should fit tightly into the bolt head while rotating counter clockwise, which will loosen the stripped fastener. Amazon and others sell them (Amazon screw/bolt extractor set)
    3 points
  4. I created a video on how to remove and disassemble the front door. This includes removing the bottom trim strip, door lock, door handle, inner door panel, window/frame and door shell.
    2 points
  5. The factory default for the valves is the loud position, so if they are not hooked up, that is what you get. The valves only move to the "quiet" position when activated. The original reason for the valves was the incredibly restrictive Swiss noise laws for residential neighborhoods, so when the vehicle was operating a low speeds, it was quiet.
    2 points
  6. If you are even considering that, that's because you don't really like the car and should sell it. To me. For cheap.
    2 points
  7. Sometimes when there is a voltage spike to the system (like connecting a new battery) the programming can get "mixed up". When this happens the best thing to do is have a tech/shop with a PIWIS re-program the affected control module(s). I think it very rare to replace a DME if most everything but one or two items are not working.
    2 points
  8. As someone that spent a significant part of his career in the battery business, your use of "assuming the proportions are the same" is more than seriously flawed. The CCA test used by the BCI (Battery Council International, the international technical consortium that sets standards for battery ratings and testing procedures used by battery manufacturers world wide) is very similar to the one used by the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers); which requires storing the finished and fully charged battery a 0F (-17.8 C) for a period of 24 hours, then load testing it to determine its CCA rating. There is no known "proportioning" formula for determining this value, only hard testing data. Lightweight battery manufacturers have been "inventing" unique rating values and "equivalencies" without a basis in technical facts, and that are really totally meaningless, simply because they know what the outcome of publishing the more widely accepted testing data would be: Their batteries would appear weak compared to conventional SLI (starting, lighting, ignition) batteries.
    2 points
  9. +1 Sunset Porsche is an excellent site p.s. I see you're in Brooklyn. I used to live in Clinton Hill.
    1 point
  10. Porsche has typically used gear oils that are designed to their specifications, particularly in the five speeds because of the synchro ring materials of construction. As the result, the factory fill gear oils lack any API or "G" gradings because they are unique. A lot of the smaller aftermarket suppliers claim they have "equivalent" products, that in reality are not. Over the years, I have lost count of how many gallons of aftermarket gear oils we have drained out of customer cars due to complaints of poor shifting, particularly in the cold, noise, etc. And that includes a lot of Redline, Royal Purple, and Amsoil products. And except for transmissions that had sustained damage while using these aftermarket products, every time we switched the car back to the factory fill, all the customer's issues disappeared. Years ago, we contacted all the major gear oil vendors looking for a true match to the factory gear oils; Mobil 1 summed up best when they told us that "Porsche uses totally unique gear oil formulation requirement's, which are made to their specifications, and which do not match any of our off the shelf offerings. And as Porsche represents such a small segment of the overall market, we will not be attempting to replicate their formulation requirements."
    1 point
  11. Update: The fix for this was much easier than anticipated. I didn't have to remove the cams after all, just had to loosen the cam sprocket allowing the cams to move a little bit to release the tension. Reinstallation of the oil/coolant manifold and IMS bearing went easily and re-timed the cams again per the book. Now im ready to put it all back together and reinstall the engine back into the car. Thanks for all the help
    1 point
  12. Fault code 0470 CAN comfort in single-wire operation Note! This fault was detected by the 'rear convenience system' control unit. Possible causes of fault • Open circuit in CAN comfort (high) • Open circuit in CAN comfort (low) Diagnosis/troubleshooting Visual inspection: In the next troubleshooting section, please check first that the affected pins on the rear convenience system control unit plug connection are neither damaged nor corroded. The wiring and plugs of the affected components must also be checked for external damage and proper contact. Repair damaged or corroded pins if possible, otherwise replace affected pins. Repair or replace damaged wires. Sporadic faults: In the event of faults that occur sporadically, the wiring positions that are linked to moving parts on and in the vehicle must be checked for each system. Various statuses that can cause faults must be simulated with the help of the wiring diagram.
    1 point
  13. 20 year old car - I would look for intake hose cracks /splitting. Many times you can hear an exhaust leak (phish-phish noise).
    1 point
  14. Thanks JFP, cleaned those out this spring and they were a mess. Not real active on this forum, mainly a lurker, but really appreciate your info you provide here and elsewhere. I just completed a full suspension refresh, and have spent way more than I paid for the car restoring it to her glory, but runs and drives like a new one and plan to keep it for a long time. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1 point
  15. welcome to RennTech Amazon my have what you are looking for; https://smile.amazon.com/s?k=outside+mirror+wide+angle+stick+on&ref=nb_sb_noss
    1 point
  16. If you have a qualified repair shop there is no reason not to buy the Bell Housing. Porsche, like many other manufacturers, sell only complete units.
    1 point
  17. I have run into the same problem. The drivers side seat refuses to move in any direction. I pulled the switch and it appears to be okay. I pulled the white tabs under the bottom of the seat to release it from the frame. This allows access to the under seat wiring. I checked everything. I believe it comes down to the memory seat unit under the seat. I have power to it, but nothing works. I think it fried itself. Fortunately, the seat is in the correct position for me, so I gave up on it. Hasn't worked in about 2 years. It is just dead. And bonus, you need to be able to run the seat forwards and backwards to get to the seat bolts in order to lift up the seat and get to the memory module. Not happening.
    1 point
  18. Yep, ignorance is bliss. my recollection is you cannot manually adjust the powered seats. I remember the procedure for lubing the forward/back screw-like drive, but don’t recall ever reading about any manual adjustment. good luck.
    1 point
  19. Be sure to post a pic, and good luck with the maintenance!
    1 point
  20. For the most part, the regulators are lubed with white lithium grease, and a very little goes a long way with this stuff as it tends to stick to everything, so you don't want excess getting all over everything. The motor should not need relubrication.
    1 point
  21. So sorry I forgot to post the image that goes with the explanation (more or less)...
    1 point
  22. If I am not mistaken CC control inputs would be stored in the DME. If yours is acting up you may have a DME with an internal short or coding issue. Hopefully you only have a bad switch as opposed to needing a new DME.
    1 point
  23. Some of the early cars had a real problem getting the IM Readiness test "not ready" status to change without resorting to the PIWIS, even after all the necessary repairs have been completed. I have personally seen cars go more that 200 miles of daily drive cycles before the system switched to "ready", but I have never seen or heard for one going 2,400 miles. I would have to agree with Loren on this one; something is still not right. If the O2 sensor ahead of the cats goes to a straight line zero, or near zero voltage while the SAI pump is running, the system is functional. Before repair After repair
    1 point
  24. Update! So I decided to start by check the driver's side, and boy am I glad I did (since the pressured line on the passenger side is such a mess to remove)-- it seems that when getting the filter seated last night, I somehow managed to have one of the electrical connectors going to the filter (the black and red cables) came unplugged!! 🙄🙄 She's alive!! 🙂
    1 point
  25. Most likely the control boxes have returned to factory settings after the work which has been carried out. Run the "Vehicle handover" program using a PIWIS tool and you should be fine.
    1 point
  26. And here it is, already installed and working just fine: Looks awfully empty in there. I guess I have a little bit more of frunk space now 😉 The size comparison is amazing as well as the weight: 26kg the Bosch, 3.3kg the lithium. Considering that I replaced the comfort full electric seats with the 997GT2 seats, and saved about 40kg there, I managed to offset the weight of the Tip when compared with the manual 😉 Disclaimer: neither one of those mods was done to save weight, it's just a positive side-effect. I bought the Bosch about 5 years ago and it served me very well but it was no longer holding a charge and I had to have it on the tender overnight, going to sleep with 12.6 and waking up with 12.2 if off it. After a couple of days not running and off-tender, it was down to 12V. It was still starting ok but I guess it was a matter of time and as I hate being left stranded, decided to replace it. After having a look at all possibilities, Yuasa YBX9xxx, same-model Bosch (which is an AGM 95Ah 850A now) and top of the range Bosch S6, I ended up with lithium, after my excellent experience with my bike's lithium battery. With a nice Black Friday deal, I got this for about 600€, which is 3 times as much as a S5A13 and in the same price range as a S6 AGM. With the manufacturer states a duration of 3 to 5 times a lead acid. I hope so but don't really count on it: 15 to 25 years out of a starter battery? But let's see, battery duration is always a question mark, with the Porsche Moll ones never having lasted me more than 3 years and costing about half of this lithium.
    1 point
  27. Just want to report the end of the story. Replacing the fuel pump didn’t change anything. Only after getting a new fuel filter the codes disappeared. No more blowing fuses. Everything ok. Car passed the emission test. Very happy. Actually not very difficult this job. Lots of DIY reports everywhere. Just it’s a mess to work inside a fuel tank. Thank you for following and supporting
    1 point
  28. It turns out, the actual sensor itself isn't bad, one of the bushings of the ball and socket connector is completely gone.
    1 point
  29. From the Lost Radio Code FAQ... I get a WAIT on the display - what do I do? You have to wait at least 30 minutes before trying again.
    1 point
  30. I got mine from Dido as well. Look great and no issues so far after 2 years.
    1 point
  31. thank you both so much, the crankshaft position sensor went on me earlier during covid. when I pulled out the dipstick tube to get to the plug, the o-ring for the dipstick tube decided to stay in the block. It was a super pita to get that out we've been without the car for a while. getting these plugs sorted without putting them backwards is the last step to get the car back on the road
    1 point
  32. Driving wind can also make such a noise, tape the seems from the front trunk to the other body parts with duck tape, the seals around the front windshield, the seams from the convertible top to the windshield(s) etc., do test drives to locate the noise. Of course, it would be easier to use an ultrasonic device if possible.
    1 point
  33. I am starting to debug the Cayenne seat heating system and I'm starting a post with some findings as there was limited information in forum searches and this could be a helpful comparison as we keep these running. The seat heater is actual composed of 4 seat heating elements: a pad that heats the bottom (center), a coil that heats in the bottom bolster left and right, a pad that heats in the backrest (center), and an element that heats the side bolster. The center seat pad also contains a thermistor (a resistor whose resistance changes based on the temperature), and it's role is to prevent overheating. A common issue is that the seats begin to heat and then turn off after 2-6 minutes. It is most common in the front seats and normally affects only one seat. Apparently, I have read that this is likely due to either the thermistor or its thin leads failing. Since the thermistor is attached to the seat cushion, they'll typically replace the whole seat, which is great if you're under warranty, not so much if you are not (>$1000). I was working on a 2005 CTT that started to have this issue and I started debugging. The connector that attaches to the bottom seat cushion heater pad includes 4 leads. 2 go to the seat heater elements, and 2 to the thermistor. heater power: brown/black and green/white thermistor: brown/white and black/white The heater is separate from the seat motion controls, and there is also a 2-wire connector that goes to the backrest. I'm attaching a diagram illustrating the circuit. I located the 4pin connector to the bottom seat cushion and pulled it out, and checked resistances. The seat cushion heater elements measure at 2.5Ohms (this would be about 60W heater, seems reasonable) and the thermistor measures 6.8k ohms on an 84F day. Assuming this is a standard 12k NTC thermistor, this indicates about 90-91F. Since the thermistor in this case has not completely failed, it seems like it is not a simple case of the leads failing and I'll have more debugging to find more conclusive results. One next idea is to temporarily bypass the thermistor with a 10-12k resistor. I wouldn't want to do this long term as it could cause problems, but I'll update as I go along. 2005 Cayenne Turbo
    1 point
  34. P1467 Radiator fans 2: Mechanical fault Possible fault causes: Radiator fans 2 stiff or blocked Radiator fans 2 Faulty
    1 point
  35. I agree with millerchris85. After all the work and money poured into my CTT it’s eh now and I’d have been better served tuning up my 996TT. If you really must have a sporty drive in a Cayenne then I suggest looking after a 958 GTS, Turbo or Turbo S and having someone tuned them to your liking. Be forewarned though you will wear through ancillaries (brakes, axles, tensioners, etc...) much faster depending on how much and how hard you drive
    1 point
  36. Should be a case of unbolting and then disconnecting the wire harness connectors.
    1 point
  37. P12A1 Possible fault causes Predelivery quantity or pressure in fuel low-pressure circuit too low Fuel high-pressure system leaking Fuel high-pressure sensor faulty Fuel high-pressure pump faulty P1026 Possible fault causes Only if the value is below the lower limit: Predelivery quantity or pressure in fuel low-pressure circuit too low Tank (almost) (driven) empty If the value is below or exceeds the limits: Quantity control valve faulty (in fuel high-pressure pump) Fuel high-pressure pump faulty
    1 point
  38. Your stated voltage measurment is weak. You should be testing the primary cables, the large ones running from the battery to the ground and starter, these are the ones that tend to develop internal corrosion. If you are unfamiliar with this test, do a search as this has been covered several times previously. We always load test both the alternator and battery when there is a problem. While this requires a load tester, it verifies that both are capable of delivering both the correct voltage and current (amps) as required.
    1 point
  39. This has been covered before, but it can be done using a 4" diameter plastic pipe coupler (has a ridge half way down the inside that the old flywheel bolt heads can rest on, then tighten slowly in a crosswise pattern to pull it in evenly.) The trick to getting the new design PTFE seal to work where the older design did not is being absolutely scrupulously clean, not even finger prints on any parts, and no sealant of any kind. You also have to install it at an unusual depth, 13MM from the flywheel mating surface of the crank, not 14MM.
    1 point
  40. Take a look, after removing the trim, to the park brake lever mechanism ( pedal ). There is a damper installed who's leaking and helps no longer the pedal in his stroke to come back fully, the brake switch is than not fully depressed. Unfortunately the damper is not available separately, perhaps some specialised shops can help you out.
    1 point
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