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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/27/2019 in Tutorials

  1. 3 points
    This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time: ~2 hours If you’re getting a Durametric error code P0674, you likely have a bad PCV valve that needs to be replaced. An easy way to test a bad PCV valve is to unscrew the oil fill cap on the engine while it is idling. If you feel suction on the cap and/or the idle fluctuates once the cap is removed then your PCV valve is bad. The PCV valve is built into the valve cover so your options are to buy a whole new valve cover assembly (95510513500- ~$347) or buy just the PCV membrane (aftermarket $20-25) and replace it in your existing valve cover. To get access to the valve cover, you will need to follow this DIY article to remove the intake manifold first. Other reasons to remove the intake manifold are to service your fuel injectors or to make it much easier to replace the thermostat. The thermostat can be changed without removing the intake manifold (I did it twice), however you basically need to be a contortionist to reach the bolts to remove housing and you will scrape some knuckles along the way. Tools Needed: -Flathead screwdriver -Assortment of torx bits (T20, T25, T30, 6” long T30) -Pliers -Torque Wrench -3/8” ratchet set with various extensions and a universal joint -1 1/16” Deep socket -10mm Triple Square Spline Bit -Crescent Wrench -9/16” Open End Wrench -Dental pick Parts Needed: -Brake Booster Vacuum Hose- 95535557941 (your existing hose is probably brittle and will likely crack from removing it, I recommend getting a new one) -Lower Fuel Injector Seal Kit (3X) - 95511091000 (existing seals may be brittle and once you have removed the intake manifold, they may not seal properly upon reinstallation, I recommend getting new ones, need 3 sets) Procedure: First start by removing the plastic covers surrounding the engine. Using a flathead screwdriver, remove the quarter turn plastic trim fasteners. Rotate them in either direction by 90 degrees and pop them out. Be ready to catch them as sometimes they like to jump out. Next you will need to remove the 2 torx screws on either side of the engine cover with a T25 bit and the screw under the windshield washer reservoir cap with a T20 bit. Remove the oil fill cap and front engine cover by pulling straight up. They are held on by friction rings around a stud so pulling straight up will release it. Now that you have the covers removed, it’s time to remove the intake filter box and intake piping. Using your T25 torx bit, rotate the 2 screws until the dot on the screwhead lines up with the lower indication on the filter cover. Now gently use your pliers to pull them straight out. With your flathead screwdriver, pop up the two clips to release the filter housing. Pivot the filter house towards the passenger side of the car and remove it. Remove the engine air filter as well. Next, remove the wiring harness from the MAF sensor located in the middle of the intake piping. Loosen the clamp around the intake piping on the throttle body and gently work the intake piping back and forth until it releases from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt on the engine lift bracket and loosen the lower bolt with your M10 triple square bit. Then pivot the bracket towards the front of the car. Remove the bolt next to the throttle body with your M10 triple square bit. Then unplug the wire harness from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt from the bracket on the passenger side of the engine with your M10 triple square bit. Remove the vacuum lines from the intake manifold on the passenger side of the engine. One hose requires pliers to open the hose clamp, the other can be removed by hand if you squeeze the lock ring around the hose to release it. Next, from the passenger side, reach your hand around to the back side of the engine. There is a vacuum line that goes from the bottom surface of the intake manifold to the brake booster. You will need to pull the vacuum line fitting straight down to pop it out of the intake manifold. I don't have a good picture of it so here is a diagram of it. Pull down on the elbow fitting, not the hose. Also on the back side of the engine just behind the vacuum line you removed there is a bolt that needs to be removed using your M10 triple square bit. You are working blindly so locate the bolt first by feel and guide your bit to the bolt. Remove the 3 screws holding the actuator with a T25 torx bit. Slowly pull it straight out towards the front of the car. There is an actuator arm that attaches to a shaft on the passenger side of the part. Once you have enough clearance to reach your finger in there, you need to slide the arm off the shaft as you pull the entire actuator off. Then disconnect the vacuum hose from the actuator. Now pull the coolant hoses out of their holder in the intake manifold and push it towards the driver side of the car. There is a T25 torx screw that attaches this water hose bracket near the back of the intake manifold. The screw is facing up, so you need to use your T25 torx bit and get creative with removing that screw. I used a crescent wrench to turn the torx bit while holding the torx bit in place with my other hand. With the water hose bracket free, slide the water hose bracket towards the front of the car to release it from the intake manifold. This bracket has a keyhole slot that will release once it's slid forward. Remove the oil dipstick tube bracket with a T25 torx bit. Just push it out of the way once you remove the screw. With your long T30 torx bit, remove the bolt on the intake manifold that was under the actuator. Next, there are 3 blind holes on the driver side of the intake manifold. You need to use your long T30 torx bit to loosen the screws inside those holes. Those 3 screws are captive screws so they will not come out. There are 3 bolts below the intake runners. They need to be removed with your M10 triple square bit. This is where your universal joint will come in handy. The bolt near the rear of the engine required me to use my u-joint with various entensions to acess. At this point, you will hear gas leaking out. Since you have released the pressure from the lower fuel rail to the lower fuel injectors, the pressurized gas in the rail will leak out. Make sure you are working in a well ventilated area. From the driver side of the car, reach behind the engine to remove the wire harness from the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 1 1/16” deep socket, unscrew and remove the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 9/16” open wrench, unscrew the nut that connects the metal fuel line running from the lower fuel rail. The slimmer your wrench the better. My crescent wrench did not fit here. Now that the intake manifold is completely unbolted, you can start to wiggle it free. You will need to lift the manifold up from the passenger side and pivot it up towards the driver side. You will need to wiggle the lower fuel rail loose to release the metal fuel line you just unscrewed the nut from. It is a flare fitting that pushes into the upper fuel rail assembly. Be gentle here as you don’t want to bend the fuel rail. Once the metal fuel line is free from the upper assembly, you can remove the intake manifold as described above by lifting up from the passenger side first to pivot it off. At this point, you have access to the fuel injectors if you need to service them, the thermostat housing and the valve cover. Unbolting the valve cover is straight forward from here if you need to replace the PCV valve, etc. The fuel injector seal kit comes with a rubber o-ring, Teflon o-ring, Teflon sleeve and metal clip. At the bare minimum you should replace the rubber o-ring and Teflon o-ring. Use a dental pick to remove the old o-rings. These 2 parts are the wear surface when you remove/reinstall the intake manifold and are prone to fail if you re-use them. Trust me, I learned the hard way. To install the intake manifold, reverse the steps above. Take care in sliding the lower fuel rail back onto the lower fuel injectors and lining up the metal fuel line back into the flare fitting. I found it was easier to pull the lower fuel line out of the manifold to line the flare fitting up first, then pushing it into place in the intake manifold. You want to apply even pressure on the surface as you tighten all 7 of the bolts down on the driver side. Torque the 3 triple square bolts evenly to 6 ft lbs, torque angle 90 degrees, then a final torque of 22 ft lbs. The bolts holding the engine lift bracket are 17 ft lbs, the other triple square bolts holding the manifold on the head are 15 ft lbs. Once you get it all back together, turn the key to the ON then START position without your foot on the brake. This will run the fuel pumps to build pressure back up in the fuel rail. I removed the key and repeated 2-3 times to get the fuel pressure up. The first time you restart, it may take a couple seconds to fire up due to the fuel pressure needing to build back up. If you replaced your PCV valve, it may idle rough as the ECU needs to remap since it adapted to a leaking PCV valve over time. If you did not replace the fuel injector seals and smell gas/hear it leaking after shutting off the engine, then your seals failed and you need to repeat the procedure and replace those seals.
  2. 1 point
    This is a continuation from the front wheel bearing change. That was good practice for the rear of your car. Although i thought the rear was more difficult than the front but after i was done and found a couple of tricks that i will share, it might actually be easier. Having the right tools always make things go smoother. The B90-P2 tool i bought at http://www.samstagsales.com/Porsche.htm#axle Took only 3 days to get it. I was away at work for 4 days so the timing was perfect. Great service. Earlier this year people were wondering where to get the tools to take apart the electrical connectors. Well sams tag sales has all the Porsche tools needed. With the SIR TOOLS kit they sent me the catalog with all the speciality stuff. If you don't have an arsenal of basic tools i would recommend going to Sears. The prices are higher than a China Freight but Sears does treat their people well and nothing like supporting the american people right? Attached is a photo of a great tool set that has almost all that you need. It even comes with the 32mm large socket for the hub bolt. Aside from those tools you will need some larger wrenches. 21mm for the track arm. (Actually you don't have to take this apart...more later) But you do need some larger wrenches for the Sir Tools Kit. 1 and 1/16. Some allen key sockets. Best to get a set of 7 in metric. Sears also sells the Torx socket set too. You will need at least 2 torque wrenches. My trick for the 360 foot pound setting is later. Some plyers, punch, screwdriver set. Phillops, flat etc... Discount auto parts sells a paint can full of GunK degreaser. And has a tin to put the small bolts in. Great stuff. Don't drink it. If i forgot some i will post it further down. So lets get going... Have the car parked so you have lots of space to work around it. Back the car into the garage far enough so you have room to close the garage door if you need to make a run to the tool store. Don't ask me why i mention this! Set the parking brake, and remove the center cap. I pushed in an allen key and used a vice grip to pull it out. Pull hard. Get your long 4 foot bar, 32mm socket and loosen the axel bolt. You can even take it off all the way, it doesn't reall matter. Loosen the 5 lug bolts, 4 19mm and the third i hope you have the locking one. Jack the car up and put it up on stands. You will need to use the jack later and it just isn't safe to have your head under a car with just a hydraulic jack. Remove the wheel bolts and then the wheel, don't forget to use the factory supplied tool to help with the removal and installation of the wheel.
  3. 1 point
    The Tiptronic transmission has a special tool for fluid. First you have to purchase the tool (expensive) or make one (inexpensive). The tool is the V.A.G.1924, runs about $300. You need the following tools and parts to start: 1. ATF fill tool 2. 7 (US) Quarts of Pennzoil Multi-Vehicle ATF 3. Torque wrench for 60 ft lbs 4. Torque wrench for 7.5 ft lbs (90 in lbs) 5. 17 mm allen bit 6. 8 mm allen bit 7. Torx 27 bit 8. Temperature meter with probe. I used an Oregon Scientific with a probe that has a 10 ft cord. 9. Porsche part 986 397 016 00 Paper gasket (Call Sunset Porsche, great guys) 10. Porsche part 986 307 403 00 ATF filter 11. Porsche part 986 397 016 00 rubber ring for fill plug 12. Kitty liter, you will spill 13. Socket set 14. Plenty of rags 15. Oil catch pan 16. Safety goggles First we assemble the filling tool out of parts you can find in Lowes or Home Depot type of homestores: 1. Hudson 1 gallon tank ($9.95) 2. Barbed fittings and 8 ft of tygon 3/8 clear hose. 3. 1/4 inch shut off valve - brass 4. 12 inch of flexible copper tube, 1/4" 5. Assemble as shown below and bend the tube per the picture. The steps are easy to follow: 1. Lift car off the ground and on jack stands. I need 16 inches on the stands to be comfortable. 2. Slide oil catch pan under fluid pan and remove drain plug with 8 mm allen bit 3. Remove the cross arm that traverses the fluid pan. Loosen only one bolt, remove the other. It will be easier for the next step and you can prop the arm to help catch the pan when the bolts are removed. 4. When the fluid has drained, secure drain plug back in and torque to 30 ft lbs. 5. Using the Torx 27 bit, remove all the screws crosswise. Move the cross arm out of the way as needed, but put back in a place where the pan will not fall. THE PAN STILL HAS FLUID in it, be careful 6. Remove pan carefully. The green gasket should still be attached to it. 7. Remove the two screws that hold the filter in place. Make sure the oil catch pan is underneath, the filter will have fluid as well. Remove filter. 8. Thinly coat some petroleum jelly on the suction collar of the ATF filter and install filter 9. Install new filter and screw the two screws to a torque of 4.5 ft lbs. 10. Empty the filter pan into the oil catch pan with all the waste oil. Place the filter pan on a flat surface and remove the gasket. 11. Set the plastic guard cap so the two windows are facing sideways. The holes will be used later for the fill tube and for the temperature probe. Notice how large they are. 12. Use the rags to clean the pan and the magnets in the pan. Set the magnets back to their original location. Here is a nice clean pan and magnets. 13. Place the new gasket on the pan. I used petroleum jelly thin coat on a few places to hold it in place. 14. Fit ATF pan back into transmission, tighten the screws crosswise to 7.5 ft lbs. It may be convenient to use the cross arm as a resting place while you re-attach the pan. 15. Remove the fill plug with the 17 mm allen key. Replace the ring gasket with the new one. 16. Fill the pressure tank with ATF fluid, make sure the valve is closed. Pump the tank to provide the pressure to move the fluid. The clear hose will show the red fluid filling it, and also you will see it running later. 17. Insert the "hook" end of the copper tube into the fill hole, and hook it into one of the holes mentioned before. Insert the temperature probe into the other hole, make sure it is secured. 18. Open the valve and let the ATF fluid begin to flow. You will have to add more fluid to the tank and keep it pumped. When the fluid begins to escape through the hole. It will drip, so close the valve. 19. Start the car. Open the valve to let more fluid into the ATF pan. Keep it pumped. Look at the temperature display on your probe. The temperature should not exceed 45 C. It begins at room temperature, so you got a few minutes. 20. Move the selector to position "P" and let idle for a a few seconds. When the fluid begins to emerge again from the filler tube, close the filling valve. 21. The engine should still be idling, keep an eye on the temp probe. With the brake pedal on, change the transmission through each position, holding the position for 10 seconds. 22. Open fill valve again until ATF fluid escapes from the hole. Make sure the temperature is higher than 30 C, and should be around 40C by now. Remove temperature probe and filler tube. 23. Replace the filler plug and torque to 59 ft lbs. 24. Turn engine off, and take car out for a test. :drive: 25. You are done, check for leaks, clean the spills (cat litter), and enjoy some smooth shifting.
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