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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/24/2018 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time: ~2 hours If you’re getting a Durametric error code P0674, you likely have a bad PCV valve that needs to be replaced. An easy way to test a bad PCV valve is to unscrew the oil fill cap on the engine while it is idling. If you feel suction on the cap and/or the idle fluctuates once the cap is removed then your PCV valve is bad. The PCV valve is built into the valve cover so your options are to buy a whole new valve cover assembly (95510513500- ~$347) or buy just the PCV membrane (aftermarket $20-25) and replace it in your existing valve cover. To get access to the valve cover, you will need to follow this DIY article to remove the intake manifold first. Other reasons to remove the intake manifold are to service your fuel injectors or to make it much easier to replace the thermostat. The thermostat can be changed without removing the intake manifold (I did it twice), however you basically need to be a contortionist to reach the bolts to remove housing and you will scrape some knuckles along the way. Tools Needed: -Flathead screwdriver -Assortment of torx bits (T20, T25, T30, 6” long T30) -Pliers -Torque Wrench -3/8” ratchet set with various extensions and a universal joint -1 1/16” Deep socket -10mm Triple Square Spline Bit -Crescent Wrench -9/16” Open End Wrench -Dental pick Parts Needed: -Brake Booster Vacuum Hose- 95535557941 (your existing hose is probably brittle and will likely crack from removing it, I recommend getting a new one) -Lower Fuel Injector Seal Kit (3X) - 95511091000 (existing seals may be brittle and once you have removed the intake manifold, they may not seal properly upon reinstallation, I recommend getting new ones, need 3 sets) Procedure: First start by removing the plastic covers surrounding the engine. Using a flathead screwdriver, remove the quarter turn plastic trim fasteners. Rotate them in either direction by 90 degrees and pop them out. Be ready to catch them as sometimes they like to jump out. Next you will need to remove the 2 torx screws on either side of the engine cover with a T25 bit and the screw under the windshield washer reservoir cap with a T20 bit. Remove the oil fill cap and front engine cover by pulling straight up. They are held on by friction rings around a stud so pulling straight up will release it. Now that you have the covers removed, it’s time to remove the intake filter box and intake piping. Using your T25 torx bit, rotate the 2 screws until the dot on the screwhead lines up with the lower indication on the filter cover. Now gently use your pliers to pull them straight out. With your flathead screwdriver, pop up the two clips to release the filter housing. Pivot the filter house towards the passenger side of the car and remove it. Remove the engine air filter as well. Next, remove the wiring harness from the MAF sensor located in the middle of the intake piping. Loosen the clamp around the intake piping on the throttle body and gently work the intake piping back and forth until it releases from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt on the engine lift bracket and loosen the lower bolt with your M10 triple square bit. Then pivot the bracket towards the front of the car. Remove the bolt next to the throttle body with your M10 triple square bit. Then unplug the wire harness from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt from the bracket on the passenger side of the engine with your M10 triple square bit. Remove the vacuum lines from the intake manifold on the passenger side of the engine. One hose requires pliers to open the hose clamp, the other can be removed by hand if you squeeze the lock ring around the hose to release it. Next, from the passenger side, reach your hand around to the back side of the engine. There is a vacuum line that goes from the bottom surface of the intake manifold to the brake booster. You will need to pull the vacuum line fitting straight down to pop it out of the intake manifold. I don't have a good picture of it so here is a diagram of it. Pull down on the elbow fitting, not the hose. Also on the back side of the engine just behind the vacuum line you removed there is a bolt that needs to be removed using your M10 triple square bit. You are working blindly so locate the bolt first by feel and guide your bit to the bolt. Remove the 3 screws holding the actuator with a T25 torx bit. Slowly pull it straight out towards the front of the car. There is an actuator arm that attaches to a shaft on the passenger side of the part. Once you have enough clearance to reach your finger in there, you need to slide the arm off the shaft as you pull the entire actuator off. Then disconnect the vacuum hose from the actuator. Now pull the coolant hoses out of their holder in the intake manifold and push it towards the driver side of the car. There is a T25 torx screw that attaches this water hose bracket near the back of the intake manifold. The screw is facing up, so you need to use your T25 torx bit and get creative with removing that screw. I used a crescent wrench to turn the torx bit while holding the torx bit in place with my other hand. With the water hose bracket free, slide the water hose bracket towards the front of the car to release it from the intake manifold. This bracket has a keyhole slot that will release once it's slid forward. Remove the oil dipstick tube bracket with a T25 torx bit. Just push it out of the way once you remove the screw. With your long T30 torx bit, remove the bolt on the intake manifold that was under the actuator. Next, there are 3 blind holes on the driver side of the intake manifold. You need to use your long T30 torx bit to loosen the screws inside those holes. Those 3 screws are captive screws so they will not come out. There are 3 bolts below the intake runners. They need to be removed with your M10 triple square bit. This is where your universal joint will come in handy. The bolt near the rear of the engine required me to use my u-joint with various entensions to acess. At this point, you will hear gas leaking out. Since you have released the pressure from the lower fuel rail to the lower fuel injectors, the pressurized gas in the rail will leak out. Make sure you are working in a well ventilated area. From the driver side of the car, reach behind the engine to remove the wire harness from the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 1 1/16” deep socket, unscrew and remove the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 9/16” open wrench, unscrew the nut that connects the metal fuel line running from the lower fuel rail. The slimmer your wrench the better. My crescent wrench did not fit here. Now that the intake manifold is completely unbolted, you can start to wiggle it free. You will need to lift the manifold up from the passenger side and pivot it up towards the driver side. You will need to wiggle the lower fuel rail loose to release the metal fuel line you just unscrewed the nut from. It is a flare fitting that pushes into the upper fuel rail assembly. Be gentle here as you don’t want to bend the fuel rail. Once the metal fuel line is free from the upper assembly, you can remove the intake manifold as described above by lifting up from the passenger side first to pivot it off. At this point, you have access to the fuel injectors if you need to service them, the thermostat housing and the valve cover. Unbolting the valve cover is straight forward from here if you need to replace the PCV valve, etc. The fuel injector seal kit comes with a rubber o-ring, Teflon o-ring, Teflon sleeve and metal clip. At the bare minimum you should replace the rubber o-ring and Teflon o-ring. Use a dental pick to remove the old o-rings. These 2 parts are the wear surface when you remove/reinstall the intake manifold and are prone to fail if you re-use them. Trust me, I learned the hard way. To install the intake manifold, reverse the steps above. Take care in sliding the lower fuel rail back onto the lower fuel injectors and lining up the metal fuel line back into the flare fitting. I found it was easier to pull the lower fuel line out of the manifold to line the flare fitting up first, then pushing it into place in the intake manifold. You want to apply even pressure on the surface as you tighten all 7 of the bolts down on the driver side. Torque the 3 triple square bolts evenly to 6 ft lbs, torque angle 90 degrees, then a final torque of 22 ft lbs. The bolts holding the engine lift bracket are 17 ft lbs, the other triple square bolts holding the manifold on the head are 15 ft lbs. Once you get it all back together, turn the key to the ON then START position without your foot on the brake. This will run the fuel pumps to build pressure back up in the fuel rail. I removed the key and repeated 2-3 times to get the fuel pressure up. The first time you restart, it may take a couple seconds to fire up due to the fuel pressure needing to build back up. If you replaced your PCV valve, it may idle rough as the ECU needs to remap since it adapted to a leaking PCV valve over time. If you did not replace the fuel injector seals and smell gas/hear it leaking after shutting off the engine, then your seals failed and you need to repeat the procedure and replace those seals.
  2. 3 points
    Updated Mileage: 288,565. 2018 Round trips included NY to Seattle and NY to New Orleans. Still not driving as much as I'd like. #4 cylinder down to 75%. Trying to hold out to 300k before rebuild.
  3. 3 points
    Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. (Special thanks to Chuck Jones for being the guinea pig and for taking the photos.) Parts you will need: 997.624.113.00 Actuator Tools you will need: Very short Torx T20 driver and right angle ratchet or tool to use the short T20 in a very confined space Regular screwdriver, phillips screw driver, and 10 mm wrench to remove th wheel well liner 1. Jack the car so that right front wheel is off the ground and secure it with a jack stand. Remove the right front wheel. 2. Remove the wheel well liner by removing the the plastics rivets (pry them out with a regular screwdriver). As well remove the 10 mm nuts on each side of the axle. Now remove the phillips screws that fasten the wheel well liner under the front bumper and remove the wheel well liner (and set aside). 3. Locate the EVAP canister and remove the electrical connection at the top of the canister. Now remove the 10 mm nut that holds the canister in place. Remove gas the vapor lines - one at the top and one at the bottom (again by squeezing the connectors). Remove the EVAP canister by pulling gently back and forth until it releases from the rubber gromments 4. Look back up under the fender (now that the canister is out of the way) and locate the broken actuator. Now using the stubby Torx T-20 loose (but do not remove) the two T-20 screws. The actuator itself is a bit tough to get to and you will need a really short T-20 Torx head to loosen the two screws. I say loosen because that is all you need to do to remove the part - it sits in two "U" shaped slots. Remove the electrical connector (by squeezing the tab). Here is a pic of the new part - as you see the Torx screws are already in place so that is all you have to do to replace it. 5. Put the new part in place making sure you feed the emergency pull line through the fender to its location in the door jam. There is room to slide it through the side so you don't need to try and thread it through the hole. Fasten the two Torx screws and reconnect the electrical connector. Chuck's car had the guide rose guide piece missing (so he needed to order one) Here is a pic of his car (without guide rose) and my car (with guide rose). Ref. P/N 997.624.505.00 We also noticed that on his car the plastic catch for the lock was missing (so he needed to order that too). Here is a pic of his car (without cap) and my car (with cap). Ref. P/N 996.201.243.00 6. Reinstall the EVAP canister by pushing it into place on the rubber gromments. Then reattach the vapor lines (they should snap back into place) and the electrical connection. Finally put the 10 mm nut back in place and tighten down. 7. Reinstall the wheel well liner (reverse of removal). 8. Mount the tire, lower the car and re-torque the wheel bolts. Done.
  4. 3 points
    It seems that there are more and more cases of these faults appearing, and as some of our cars are reaching 10-12 years old, it is hardly surprising. I've compiled this information from past personal experience on both of my 996s, reading about others on here and other forums, referring to the workshop manual and wiring diagrams, and applying some logic. Hopefully you might find it useful, and save some grief when troubleshooting. DOOR MICROSWITCHES There are seven microswitches in each door which control the alarm system. Two are separate switches: a] One on the outside door handle. This switch is used to sense that the handle is lifted. b] One on the inside door handle, which has the same function. When the car is unlocked and either handle is lifted, this signals the alarm control module (ACM) to lower the appropriate window by 10mm, and turn on the interior lights. As soon as the door opens, another switch inside the door lock (explained later) tells the ACM that the door is open, which holds the window down until the door is closed, when the window is raised, and the dimming timer on the interior lights is started. Once the car is locked, the outside handle switches are ignored by the ACM. The remaining five switches are inside the door lock assembly: c] One switch senses if the door is open or closed. d] One senses that the key has been turned to the 'lock' position. e] Another senses that the key has been turned to the 'unlock' position. f] One senses that the door lock motor has reached the 'lock' position. g] Another senses that the door lock motor has reached the 'unlock' position. TYPICAL FAULTS All these microswitches can be problematic, and it is common for one or more to fail at some time. These are some of the common failures and symptoms: 1) The door window won't drop when lifting a handle. This is usually the handle microswitch which has failed. 2) The window drops, but goes back up when the door opens, or when the handle is released. This can be the handle microswitch, or more likely the 'door open/closed microswitch' ( c ) has stuck. Because the system thinks the door is still closed, it sends the window back up. 3) Door window won't go up the last 10mm. This is likely to be the 'door open/closed microswitch' ( c ) stuck in the opposite sense to (2). The system thinks the door is still open, so won't allow the window to go back up. Note that in this case the door will still lock, but you may get a single-beep from the alarm horn. 4) Door will not lock with key. The 'key lock' microswitch (d) is broken. This is very rare, as this microswitch is hardly ever used – most times the car is locked by remote. 5) Door will not unlock with key. The 'key lock' microswitch (e) is broken. This is also very rare, for the same reason. 6) Door locks, and then immediately unlocks, usually accompanied by a double-beep from the alarm horn. This is the 'door locked' microswitch (f). The locking motor physically operates the door lock, but the microswitch to sense this has failed/stuck. The ACM promptly unlocks the car. In this case, the only way to lock the door is to use the emergency locking procedure. Turn the key in the door to the lock position and back three times in quick succession. 7) The door unlocks, but there is a beep or double-beep from the alarm horn. This is the 'door unlocked' microswitch (g). Although the door is unlocked, the ACM has not recognised that. The alarm will not sound, as turning the key in the lock has deactivated it. FIXES The inside and outside handle microswitches are available separately, and are not too expensive. Although alternative equivalent switches may be available, the genuine Porsche switch comes with a connector and wiring, so it makes sense to use an original. Part Numbers: Inside handle microswitch: 996.613.123.00 (Same both sides) Outside handle microswitch: 996.613.125.00 (Left) / 996.613.126.00 (Right) The door lock microswitches are not available separately. You have to buy the complete door lock assembly, at a cost of around $120. It has been known for people to repair the offending switch though. This is a picture of a typical failure of a 'door open/close' microswitch (courtesy of another RennTech member): You can see that the plastic plunger has broken, jamming the switch lever inside. These switches are (apparently) made by Burgess, but as yet the source and part number are unknown. There are several other similar standard switches on the market for around $2, and people have stripped down the new switch and rebuilt the old one with the plunger from the new one. OTHER SWITCHES IN THE ALARM SYSTEM The other switches and contacts in the alarm system are to monitor the lid closures: Front lid microswitch Rear lid microswitch Oddment compartment microswitch Glove box microswitch Radio contact (to detect radio theft) An open compartment or switch failure will cause a single-beep of the alarm horn on locking. A system error will cause a double-beep. Other elements of the system include an interior monitoring sensor (in the overhead lighting), an alarm readiness light (on the dashboard in the centre) and a central locking button (on the dashboard). Options are a tilt sensor (next to the battery or under the left-hand seat) and an alarm siren (next to the battery).
  5. 2 points
    Front trunk, rear engine cover, doors, center console, interior sensor.
  6. 2 points
    The horn beeps and lights flashing is the alarm system telling you there is a alarm system zone fault somewhere. Could be an open (or maybe in this case closed/locked when it should be open) zone. Zones are: drivers/passenger doors, trunk lid, engine lid, glass (targa) top, gas cap lid, center console lid, and if you have it the glove box door. There are also two interior sensors in the overhead that detect motion when the car is locked. I think getting to the battery and disconnecting is a good idea. However, you have a problem since the trunk is not opening. First thing to try is actually seeing if the trunk is already open. Put your fingers under the trunk lid and try pulling up. Second is to locate the emergency release cable under the passenger side headlight. Unfortunately you need to pop the headlight out to make this a simple exercise, and you can't do that without opening the trunk. So you have to pull the passenger wheel well liner and fish out the cable from behind. Hopefully your wheel lock socket is not in your trunk!
  7. 2 points
    LONG STORY SHORT,,...My entry and drive system went bad one day., after almost a year of testing , replacing the battery, buying the test tool, almost brought a china piwis ,.... and bringing it to dealer and 800 dollars of dealer time., I had it fixed for 5 Dollars in parts. and one hr of soldering at first my kessy do not communicate to the darmatic tool or PIWIS at all, the dealer went ahead try to replace it , with a superseeded module, HOWEVER they wasn't able to program it for unknown reason, there is no module out there that will take my car's pin and complete the marry process because they said all the module has been superceeded. The dealer offer me to replace ALL the module in the car to an updated version for a cheapo $3000 dollars.! OF COURSE I refused,. ...,. I only lost my alarm horn , entry and drive function and its not worth $3000 dollars,. I was investigating myself trying to see what causing the problem, I came in to the touareg forum and found out those guys there have a lot of the problems with their module too. ... I was like ,hum.,,. then go under my dash and found the kessy module that is EXACTLY the same as theirs including the part number (WHICH IS A VW part number stamped on a sticker btw).... there is one guy there that took his module to a local electrician and found he has 2 fried mofset and 6 fried resistors.!!! I was like, fxxx it, why don't I give it a try, at first I couldn't found the 0.22ohm resistors (its was HARD trust me I took almost 2 months looking for them)., so I went ahead replaced the two mofset........... 15 mins and a lot of smoke later....... MAN,,,... the module can communicate with my Durametic tool...! HOWEVER,, all the antennas are reporting short to ground ERROR!!! I tried to clear it but the code come back instantly. then I went on to test the resistor value,... and found all six of the 0.22ohm resistors are SHORT (they are fusible resistor btw)....,,. sooooo I tried my best and finally able to locate those 0.22 ohm resistor .., fast forward 2 months later............ I received those resistors today.............. another 15 mins of smoke and sweat with my resoldering station... I plug the module back... run the scan tool clean the fault codes!!!!................... moment of truth,, I plug my dummy key in to the key cyclinder with the real key in my pocket!!!!!!!!!!!!! turn and the CAR STARTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I have successfully fixed a $3000 dollars repair (that don't guarantee will work) with 5 dollars worth of resistors !!!!!! NOTE: IF your kessy don't communicate with the scan tool,. Its the TWO MOFSET that is Fried. if you have all antennas short to ground or not responding its the 6 resistors!
  8. 2 points
  9. 2 points
    I think you need option 666 or 619 for Bluetooth phone. 619 can be retrofitted, which is less expensive than 666. By the way, you can't update the system to v2.24 in one step. You have to update to v2.23 first. Your dealer should know this. I would try to find one who knows what they are doing. The 619 Mobile phone preparation retrofit involves fitting an additional microphone and entering an activation code for the Bluetooth using a PIWIS tester.
  10. 2 points
    15-year-old car - absolutely yes. Best to change every 5 years.
  11. 2 points
    Just in case anyone comes across this thread trying to solve unstable idle issues, bigbuzuki was on the right track. I replaced the vapor canister purge valve, pretty easy and inexpensive, and the crankcase breather check valve, even easier. the purge valve may have been a contributor, but the check valve was the main culprit. What is interesting here is that all of my ventilation hoses were intact and without leaks, but if you peered inside the removed check valve, you could clearly see that the membranes inside had completely disintegrated. That immediately did the trick.
  12. 2 points
    As I noted on another forum, your expectations for power gains are probably a bit of a pipe dream. Normally aspirated Porsche engines have historically showed only very small gains in either torque or HP from the type of modifications you are considering when validated in dyno testing, and even these small gains only occurred at the very high end of the RPM curves. While the marketers of these products typically make substantial improvement gains, before and after dyno runs have not born out their claims. To get the 40-50 HP you are seeking is going to require significant internal engine modifications, which is not going to come cheaply.
  13. 2 points
    Personally, if the body shop damaged it, I would insist they replace it. It's there fault. That being said, you'll have to remove the door panel to replace the upper window weather seal. Check out this video...
  14. 2 points
    EDIT: Additional info added at bottom of tutorial, refers to recently found info, clarifying how many different fluids are needed for the 970 generation of Panamera PDK (at end of tutorial). Attached is a DIY for changing fluid on Panamera PDK transmission. Got this from a fellow forum member who happened to do the change. This should help many interested in doing maintenance on Panamera without paying thousands for it. Speaking to shop/dealer, after 60k, filter/pan replacement not absolutely necessary (cost of the kit is about $350). So for 60k, drain and refill fluid is fine. At 120k, you would do same fluid change, but this time replace the pan/filter as well. Read the entire DIY before you start to get a good idea of requirements and estimate time involvement for you to complete. Do not forget to replace the drain plug with its built in seal. Last thing you need is have a $15 part cause small leaking, and then have to put car up, open up drain plug, lose a bunch of expensive oil, just to put new drain plug in. So dont cut on this one part. You can get the Pentosine FFL3 PDK fluid directly from Porsche, or from Pentosine resellers. Porsche will charge you triple the price for identical fluid. You choose. Everything you need is mentioned in the DIY. Since Durametric does not have capability to monitor PDK temperature yet, you can use an IR thermometer, when you heat up the PDK to 40 celsius, after you put in 6-8 quarts or so, and when doing final level check. Good luck. 970 generation Panamera PDK transmission info: ZF is manufacturer of PDK transmission for Porsche They make 2 PDK transmissions One for mid & rear engine applications (911, boxter, etc) Another one specifically made for the Panamera Panamera PDK servicing requires two (2) fluids only (as compared to 3 fluids in other PDK car models at Porsche FFL3 fluid - Gearbox & clutches - need about 9 quarts Shell TF0951 - Front final drive - need about 0.4 quarts Here is the info dug up from ZF on this topic: "In fact, two separate DCT ranges or 'platforms' have been developed by ZF, both fitted with wet clutches, for use in Porsche's various longitudinal applications. The first is for use in the mid- and rear-engine sports cars (the 911, the Cayman and the Boxster), while a completely different platform has been developed for use in the larger Panamera. For each platform, two different torque options are available, with the 500N.m versions using an 'ND2015' clutch pack, and the 780N.m versions using an 'ND2216' clutch pack, both supplied by ZF Sachs....... In terms of the oil circuit itself, two completely different approaches have been employed for the two platforms. Non Panamera models: The 7DT45 and 7DT70 have two oil circuits, and hence two different oils; the first is Pentosin FFL-3 for the clutch and hydraulics, and the second is ExxonMobil Mobilube PTX 75W-90 for the gear-set and bevel gear. The oil levels have been kept as low as possible, to reduce churning losses for those moving parts that are immersed in oil. Panamera: Conversely, the 7DT75 has a single oil circuit and a dry sump (to minimize churning losses), with an 'active lubrication system' to feed oil to each gear-set and clutch. This version uses only the Pentosin FFL-3 lubricant, which was developed exclusively for the ZF DCTs. One of the main reasons for using a single oil circuit is that clutch cooling is required at both ends of the transmission, for the main dual-clutch module and for the hang-on clutch used in the four-wheel-drive variant. This would have presented significant sealing complications had multiple circuits been chosen." Bottom line: What this means is that the Panamera PDK uses transmission design which uses one fluid compartment for the gearbox and the clutches, and another separate compartment for the final drive. Two fluids total.
  15. 2 points
    After this I hope we will not see any more posts about 'I took the Panamera to the dealer to replace the cabin filter'. Makes my eyes water thinking how easy it is to do on your own. If you really have too much money, send me some (I can pm you my paypal id), and/or you can send some dough to contribute to this forum. Come on, if you can afford $250 for cabin air filter change, you can support us here. Just follow each pic from 1 to 10. All needed is your fingers, but in case you do not like using your fingers, get some soft plastic pry tool. Good luck.
  16. 2 points
    Reset 'Service Now' Message - Durametric I know this is a super simple one, but I have seen many inquiries with plenty of people saying this is not possible. So thought to provide accurate steps. In case you need to reset that pesky message appearing on your speedo, telling you to service your car now, do the following. I have been doing this via Durametric, with 100% success rate so far. Durametric sw ver: 6.5.2.0 - Connect cable to ODB2 port in car, and other end of cable into powered on laptop - Start Durametric SW - IF asked to choose your year/vehicle, do so and click OK to proceed - Click the + sign next to Instrument Cluster section to expand it - Highlight the 'Commands' section - On right side of window, you will see prompt is you want to reset the service message. - Click reset, wait for completion message, click OK to close window and close Durametric. Done. Author ciaka Category Cayenne (9PA, 9PA1) - Maintenance Submitted 10/13/2016 06:24 PM  
  17. 2 points
    I got sick of not having cupholders in my Boxster. So I set out to find some. The options seemed to be OEM cupholders, either the clip on type, or the single DIN type. And we all know the problems with those - not secure enough fit, not accommodating large cups, etc. Also, the DIN type takes up an entire vertical DIN slot, making fitting double DIN GPS impossible. Other solutions seem to be to use a cutout for cups in the centre console box - which means the lid needs to stay open; and "ultimate cupholder" - which doesn't look OEM at all. So I was searching for generic cupholders on Ebay, and found this: http://cgi.ebay.com....=item439b780b6e And from a seller, the dimensions are: 7 7/16" long by 1" just the cover lid, assembly is 7" x 4 3/4" The width is as close to OEM fit for the Boxster as it gets, for a non-Porsche part! So I bought it. Realising that late model VWs like Passat and Jetta has the same console width as our Boxster, I then bought this: http://cgi.ebay.com....=item3ca672b7af It's entirely possible that other units like this http://cgi.ebay.com....=item3356ef534c would also fit. And before you start, get a rotary tool (like a Dremel). It's an absolute god send! Made things so easy. Here is the unit: Compared to another double DIN unit I originally planned for the mod: The difference is the newer one has a hi res screen. I actually rather liked the volume knob on the low res one. I put the cupholder and GPS unit together, with double sided tape, like this: You can also mount the cupholder on top, like this: I chose to go with the bottom fit, because I don't really like cups placed that high, and the bottom fit actually takes up a few mm less in height, which gives a better fit in the horseshoe frame. Speaking of frame, it's cut up, like this: There was a lip on the inner aspect of the lower border, this was cut to make room to increase the height. This, together with some slight sanding of the bottom of the cupholder was all that's required to make the height of the combo fit just right. Incredibly lucky! Note, you must get rid of the lower lip much as you can. Or the cupholder would be clamped too tight between the frame and the GPS, and it doesn't open when clamped tight. In the above picture, you can see I turned the OEM metal bracket around. This was necessary as the cupholder doesn't extend as deep as the OEM stereo, so the bracket support needs to come forward. You need to drill a hole in the original bracket to allow this. The reason will be very apparent when you actually do this. Here is a close up of the reversed bracket: The GPS antenna is simply placed near the alarm cover. Remove the alarm cover first, thread the GPS wire through, then just fish for it through the horseshoe frame. No need to remove anything else to place the GPS antenna. The thick wire attached to the GPS wire is the loom for my Head-Up-Display (another mod, for another day) :) The rest of the wiring here, with the unit ready to be pushed in: Here is the test fit: You can see that I will need a "n" shaped bezel to fill out the gap. This was obtained by modifying the Passat bezel that came with the GPS. The width is an exact fit, just like the cupholder (maybe 1mm longer, but I just left it). So I just sanded down the top border of the frame. And cut off the bottom border. I don't have a picture with the bottom border removed, only with the thinned top border: Press it in, it's a snug fit, not even sticky taped. And voooowwlaahhh!!!! OEM look!! From afar: With cupholder open: With a large "cup": In summary, get a genuine Jetta cupholder and an aftermarket Passat double DIN GPS! (not affliated with the seller/s, I promise) :)
  18. 2 points
    If your battery is dead and you need to get into the front trunk, it may be necessary to locate the manual pull wire to open the front trunk and get to the battery. This might be more difficult to locate the first time. You may not be in a good location to wrestle the right front tire splash guard to find it. It might be night time or you may not be dressed in the correct clothes to be down by the tires trying to locate it. I would recommend that you take the time to locate it in good weather and in the comfort of your garage or better yet re-route the wire to the front bumper behind the plastic plug the hides the location for the tow fish eye bolt. To get started I removed the carpet liner in the front trunk. The front trunk liner is made up of 2 sections and I only had to remove the front section. There was one thumbscrew clip on the passenger side and one thumbscrew clip opposite on the driver's side. Also on the driver's side there was one snapin clip and 2 additional snapin clips located in the front of the trunk. All five clips are very easy to find and remove. I then removed the plastic trim directly on top of the front trunk latch and microswitch. There are 4 screw plugs and you simply turn the plastic plugs 1/4 to 1/2 of a turn: I then removed the passenger side head lamp by using the tool in the Boxster tool kit. The kit is usually located near the spare tire in the front trunk. Turn the wrentch about 1/2 turn counter clockwise to unlock the headlamp. Slide the head lamp out. You may have to jiggle it a little but it should slide out with very little effort. Once the light is out you will be able to locate the pull wire. It is clamped into a lasso at the end. In the photo below you can see it at the end of the red arrow. The red oval in the top of the photo is the plastic wheel splash guard. The passenger front tire is directly behind that. Some recommend to access the pull wire from the tire side but that is a little more difficult and you still have the problem of trying to re-rout the wire up to the front bumber. Doing it from the head lamp side makes it easy. Here is another photo with my finger pointing at the pull wire. Remove the front bumper plastic cover that hides the tow plug. I used a plastic upholstery tool and the plastic cap popped right out. The plug has a fishline wire connected to it to prevent you from losing it. Use the light from a flashlight to guide you (from the front bumber side) and re-route the pull wire from the headlight to the tow plug. Having the top plastic guard off makes this very easy. Tuck the pull wire back in and re-insert the pastic bumber plug. Reassembly is just the reverse. Slide the headlamp back into the guides and push it home, use the wrentch and turn clock wise. you will hear a loud pop when the headlamp is secured. You know have easy access to the emergency pull wire.
  19. 1 point
  20. 1 point
    I would say the top unit is a knock off. We have had absolutely no luck with aftermarket AOS units, some even failing right out of the box. Considering how annoying they can be to swap out, it ain’t worth the price differential.
  21. 1 point
    Noted! Mechanical pressure gauge ordered. Will update when I have actual oil pressure values.
  22. 1 point
    Btw, you can find detailed instructions from LN here.
  23. 1 point
    Check out this thread. Sunroof drain - 6SpeedOnline - Porsche Forum and Luxury Car Resource WWW.6SPEEDONLINE.COM Cayenne Turbo - Sunroof drain - I Know this is discussed 1000 Times . Problem with clogged drains. Acces from The sunroof is easy. But i would like to Know where are this tubes ending. Where is the Exit. Somewhere in the Engine compartment? Or this Place behind the Wheel well liner? Thank you for assistance. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  24. 1 point
    Hi, Would anyone have a pdf version of the 2019 .2 3 RS owner's manual to share ? Thanks. Leong
  25. 1 point
    Broken wire, shorted wire, blown fuse, bad DME.
  26. 1 point
    I believe there is an easy way to to disconnect the negative terminal without removing the seat, so you can disconnect the batteries and lock it manually before leaving the car parked for long periods of time. You may clamp the solar chargers directly to batteries as well, so you'll have decent charge when you get back. Also, I think the main thing you need to troubleshoot is whether the emergency start mode is operating at all, and whether it's putting the load on the aux battery when needed. Quick google search says you can get the car into "emergency start mode" by cycling the key 1-2 times all the way to left then right and it should start the car by getting a helping hand from the aux battery. If the emergency mode works and it turns on a relay/switch or some sort of solenoid, then it should be putting a load into a rear battery. I guess you just need to study the wiring diagram of the optional aux battery system, and test components using a multimeter to see if everything working. Some scenarios to test: Disconnect the front battery, try to start, and see what happens. Disconnect the rear battery, try to start, observe the behavior and any errors that might pop up Have both connected, but see if it is putting a load to rear battery like in the video below.
  27. 1 point
    Have you eliminated these possibilities from the manual? I know all sorts of things got funky on mine when it had a weak battery. Page: 153 The Auto Start Stop function is available with limited functionality in the following situations, for example: – If the air conditioning or passenger compartment heating is operated at a high setting or if the defrost function is run for long time periods. – If the battery charging condition is low. – On upward or downward slopes. – During internal vehicle test procedures, e.g. automatic engine checks.
  28. 1 point
    M96/04 66Y is a 2000 MY engine, so it may be original. No way to tell if it is a single row or double row IMSB. MY 2000 is when they began a mix of engines with both dual row and then single row bearings. Just factor in having the bearing replaced, with the LN Solution being the best.
  29. 1 point
    I took it to the shop and they fixed it fairly quickly. The problem was the lights and their alignment. Once they did that it was back to looking right. In case anybody needs in the future.
  30. 1 point
    Specifically, this has been added... "All PMs (Private Messages) will be saved for 1-year maximum (365 days). PMs older than that will be automatically deleted (to save expensive space)." Why... there are currently more than 100,000 saved PMs taking up valuable storage space.
  31. 1 point
    You need to look at your oil pump, particularly the pressure by pass assembly. If metal was circulated, it could have either destroyed the pump gears or jammed open the by pass.
  32. 1 point
    Just want to share the recent installation with a set of aftermarket headlights that wrapped with mesh film.
  33. 1 point
    Hello, I am planning to replace the clutch of my 996 4s and therefore need to remove the transmission. I will put the car on these 20" (max) Bahco jack stands. Would a 5th of this jack stand also be able to support the engine? In my opinion the effect is similar to the original Porsche tool (except that it stands on the bottom and is not connected to the car). The stand could be screwed exactly to a height "touching" the crankcase. Or am I wrong and need more of these or something different? Further I need a transmission jack! Can someone recommend one? What is the maximum lowest height of this jack to remove the transmission from under the car. Thanks for hints! Gert
  34. 1 point
    Yeah, pin 66 of the DME. Should supply ground if it's happy.
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    It's right about where the rear quarter window meets the side window. "If" this link works, it shows what it looks like when the strap is disconnected. The strap is basically right where the roof is off the rails. https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/0sCo0f1h0XUkXB0ErhLxCBLL1xtJMjk55iLsa023cd15M-glLfPYOiUZvYLobih_Kcu6sIR4HfVG_LWRKZzjo1w1XmEaat_2z0dPKh30pM7tzai4OtYzyEiRiDqncAT8XC9ySDVT79Q6woBKi8g7jCpbxJJ6YoCdFBSUJxYpLTH3Wer02IpvAFM5paGHRgDbHmPKOFUNDVs4WwjVdxPc2pzlecmJtbJijIWgTzXUWA_Z-t6LgoszAKbEZ3U5mBnXwaEGJ4_ZxI2ZqRwTHLhldmSplJTbt5E100L63cNz0s5Wdfev_I4Qa2orBoFOsdThGZGuGpC9N69tw4DT708TrMsuG9FE3jKBTxSxYoWxF_U89ww1ulSnQhv1z4HKORaEImrlWMnr5-w94cO7TJC_N-SfAZ69YETRDukkwKUV82P4sTnSpvkbopuqsxoJzGPNhnGJDI2vUy5Zn1U6GTHNuhRrjlyOejQl4UBf6F6k9Ih2bZUDlwtAagaWxlswGS8iani2QnGXKDuAFUAfkle64uRQCx4kOeQnPx7Jxb2E2WLJtGLPtaT5jrxWg554U5AfNPJ_gZKQjchlz7_dUMhlb6Zk2p4KExoDAMD7bqN_=w1223-h917-no
  38. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    Dust Pollen Filter.pdf
  39. 1 point
    Serpentine belt replacement eventually, air filters. Brake service (new fluid every 2 years). In Dubai I can keep extending the warranty which covers pretty much everything else (this year a coolant cap, some valves in the cooling system, and a cup holder repair under warranty). Oh and tires. Compared to my M car it’s got a lot let plastic bits so should bode well for longevity. Last point is forget about it as a DYI car. Taking the bumper off to get to the engine isn’t conducive to tinkering. Mine is a 2012 CS with 47000 miles. Added a duck tale and GTS front spoiler as a hommage to older 911 cars. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  40. 1 point
    Thanks for the PN! Doesn't look very expensive, my local dealership has it for $26 and the o-ring is less than $2. I think the thermostat is on the back of the 3.2 V6 but for the 3.6 V6 the thermostat is on the side of the engine (driver side). I know this because I replaced it during my cooling system refresh at 90k miles. However, there does seem to be a housing for something back there, I'm just not sure what it is..
  41. 1 point
    Thanks again to all of those contributors that helped me while I went through this upgrade. This topic appears to be a common one and one that doesn't appear to have a complete solution for contending with the MOST bus. Hopefully my DIY will help owners with the MOST bus successfully upgrade their factory stereo system as I have with mine. Also note that the wiring and process described should work with any system (Kenwood, Alpine, etc.), not just the AVIC D3 as the signal requirements and factory harness wiring is detailed here. Also note that this upgrade also covers the iPod interface, Sirius satellite radio and Bluetooth module install. Good luck! 03_04_Boxster_AVIC_D3_Radio_Upgrade.pdf
  42. 1 point
    This was done on a 996 but the 986 Boxster is exactly the same... Replacing the Gas/Fuel Door Actuator
  43. 1 point
    991 S (both C2S and C4S) Front new: 34 mm minimum (after machining): 32.6 mm wear limit: 32.0 mm Rear new: 28 mm minimum (after machining): 26.6 mm wear limit: 26.0 mm
  44. 1 point
    Hi everyone. A couple of days ago, the PSM & ABS warning lights lit up on my 2001 Carrera. A quick search on this Forum suggested a faulty brake pedal switch. Checked my brake lights and sure enough, no lights so a faulty switch is definitely indicated. After about 30 minutes of twisting my body under the dash, managed to get it out. Sure enough, the switch has an open circuit. Bought a new switch and plugged it into the harness. Tested the plunger on the switch to see if the brakes lights work - but they did not. However, no PSM/ABS lights showing which is an improvement. Seemed odd to me but I have seen stranger on this car so I press ahead. Another 30 minutes of twisting my body under the dash and finally re-installed the new switch under the pedal. But now the PSM/ABS lights turn on again and still no brake lights! Back to square one! Removed the switch (now it takes me only 5 minutes to twist my body under the dash) and check it out. Checks out perfectly. And NO PSM/ABS lights with the switch plugged in but not installed under the pedal. Hmmmm. Check fuses and all the usual stuff. Everything fine. Thought about the brake light bulbs but what are chances of all 3 brake lights burned out all at once??? Surely at least one of them should be working so I can at least tell whether the brake light circuits are OK. Seriously considering taking the car to the dealer. Reinstall the switch under the pedal (I can now do that in less than 30 seconds of twisting). Check the driver side brake light bulb. It's burned out! Check the passenger side bulb. That is also burned out. Check the centre brake light - that one is OK. So why don't I at least have a centre brake light when I press the brake pedal??? Replace the driver side bulb. But still no brake lights anywhere! Remove the new bulb and check it out. Nothing wrong with it. So I replace the passenger side bulb and suddenly everything works fine, including the centre brake light! And no ABS/PSM lights! Everything fine!!! Question. Are the circuits really designed so that if one brake bulb fails, none of the others will work? Doesn't make sense to me. Lesson 1. Do the simple things first, eg. replace ALL bad bulbs before testing. Though I still don't understand why one dead bulb suppresses the other two brake lights AND turns on the ABS/PSM warning lights. Or perhaps this was just some random weird chain of events! Lesson 2. Amazing how something that originally takes 30 minutes can be done in 30 seconds with a little practice!
  45. 1 point
    Hi, I'm looking for a replacement driver side mirror motor, and switch. Can anyone tell me what the part numbers are for both? The mirror itself moves in all directions, it is fine. However, the motor does not fold the mirror inwards. I don't know if it is the switch or the motor, but, I want to replace both items, and need the part numbers. Will this part # work for me (9557312290401c)? Thanks, Jon
  46. 1 point
    I purchased the LN magnetic drain plug. Works perfect. Buy it. Really? You would buy something from a company that doesn't even have the correct measurements and they ask you for them? I would avoid that vendor like the plague. Just my two cents....
  47. 1 point
    Here's a picture of the culprit. This was the original voltage regulator taken from my alternator and replaced with the part I mentioned above (that also works in various other cars like VW, Mercedes, etc). I can't say what caused what, but it turns out that my wiring harness that runs from the alternator to the starter to a junction block was also bad and was causing resistance when it heated up (I believe there's a TSB related to this). Thanks to JFP in PA who was a huge help tracking this down and told me that these two parts can sometimes go out together. I saw Logray and some others had this problem too in the past (see link below) so that was helpful too. It's been 100+ degrees F here for the last few weeks so it's not surprising that if it was going to happen, it would happen now. http://www.renntech.... guage harness Also, FYI, in response to my own question above: The "Battery / Generator" warning message and accompanying battery light on the console goes on when the computer detects that the voltage is too low. It's not something that is "tripped" and it will go off once the battery is recharged and the alternator issues are fixed, therefore keeping the battery charged. This can also happen if you leave your light on or door open in the car too long and it drains the battery. Just take it for a spirited drive to let the alternator charge the battery or hook the battery up to a charger if it gets too low to crank the starter. Thank you! :renntech:
  48. 1 point
    Forgot...three window regulators R/H side, two window regulators L/H
  49. 1 point
    9) Remove the xenon ballast in the bi-xenon headlights (6 bolts) then disconect the harness, now remove the 5 pins (thin black, thin brown, red, yellow and uncovered ground wire) you only need two wires to turn on the xenon (Strong black and Strong brown) 10) Cut all the wires in the connector (bi-xenon headlight) NEAR to the connector and then use the plastic trick to remove it from the headlight. Take the Halogen connector and use this diagram: PIN 1 - Parking Light Lead (+) PIN 2 - High Beam Adjuster Supply PIN 3 - High Beam Adjuster Sensor PIN 4 - High Beam Adjuster Ground PIN 5 - EMPTY PIN 6 - Low Beam Lead (+) PIN 7 - High Beam Lead (+) PIN 8 - Additional High Beam Ground (-) PIN 9 - Turn Signal Lead (+) PIN 10 - Low Beam Ground/Parking light/Turn Signal (-) PIN 11 - EMPTY PIN 12 - EMPTY (tanks to toby http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php?s...pic=1189&st=20) 11) Tap every wire as this diagram says, note that inside the headlights (Halogen / bi-xenon) the grounds wires are brown and leads black 12) if you want to, remove this resistor from the bi-xenon shuttle 13) Remember to tap the bi-xenon shuttle + Auxiliary high beam whit the pins PIN 7 - High Beam Lead (+) PIN 8 - Additional High Beam Ground (-) Corner light + xenon ballast whit PIN 6 - Low Beam Lead (+) PIN 10 - Low Beam Ground/Parking light/Turn Signal (-) 14) Check all the wires, solde and insulate all wires. 15 reinstall the xenon ballast, connectors and you are done!
  50. 1 point
    The 8.75 liters (9.25 quarts) in the DIY comes from the Porsche Carrera Service Manual. This section was updated in the service manual in 2001 - the last year of 3.4 liter engine. I always put in 9 quarts when I change my oil - as this puts me well within the marks. There is just as must danger (if not more) in having too much oil as there is in having too little. My advice is don't worry about the top and bottom marks - just keep the oil level between them.
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