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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/17/2018 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    Personally, if the body shop damaged it, I would insist they replace it. It's there fault. That being said, you'll have to remove the door panel to replace the upper window weather seal. Check out this video...
  2. 1 point
    This thread will give more info. "Lazy" VarioCam, P1341 - Rennlist - Porsche Discussion Forums RENNLIST.COM 996 Forum - "Lazy" VarioCam, P1341 - UPDATE: IF YOU ARE SEEING SMALL BITS OF GREEN O-RING-ISH RUBBER IN...
  3. 1 point
    Both are for getting into restricted spaces, and can be great time and knuckle savers, but there are other ways to skin this cat....
  4. 1 point
    OK, let's start with the obvious: P0133 and P1275 both indicate that the O2 sensor ahead of the three way cat on bank 1 has aged out and needs replacing. I would get that done, clear all the codes and see if anything returns. Some of the other codes (P1126) indicate mixture issues and a possible vacuum leak, but with the O2 sensor out of wack may just be ghost codes.
  5. 1 point
    I had a similar problem recently. I had to replace the alarm module. About $150 and it is located on the middle of the firewall. I am 6’1” and have long arms and I still found it a pain to reach it. Several tutorials on the internet. Follow the steps in exact order it will help (ask me how I know this). The part is used on several cars over the years and is readily available. Do not buy a used one. They are known to fail with age. I hope this helps.
  6. 1 point
    Product ID : 1056 327 173 01 Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  7. 1 point
  8. 1 point
    Item 16 is 3 nuts per side that the muffler (mounting bracket on the muffler) to the mounting bracket on the car. Item 19 is 2 bolts per side that hold the mounting bracket to the chassis. When I remove the mufflers I just remove the 3 (per side) nuts 16. I have never seen any damage on these.
  9. 1 point
    996 Ignition Switch replace (just the switch) with pictures First off - thanks to everyone who has been down this road before me for providing tips and suggestions and troubleshooting regarding this common problem. I have been dealing with a key that would stay all the way to the right upon starting meaning that the A/C, heated seats and some other items would not function. My solution had been to simply start the car and then just move the key back one notch to the left and everything worked fine. So if others have that issue, my original solution Author scb71 Category Carrera (996) - Common Fixes and Repairs Submitted 09/16/2009 01:31 PM Updated 03/13/2017 05:24 AM  
  10. 1 point
    Probably not, the stalk functions as a momentary contact switch, if the mirror selector switch is on/off in two of the four positions, that would cause the OBC to continuously cycle in those position. You are also going to either purchase a premade aftermarket wiring harnesses for the cluster to function with either a dash switch or with the fourth stalk, or make up your own. Fabing your own is going to require finding specific size pin connectors to match the connectors already in the dash. VW used to carry them. It is much cleaner to use the fourth stalk, which can actually added without taking the column apart, or simply source the four stalk multifunctional switch and replace the three stalk. We have done several of these, but always replaced the multifunction switch with the four stalk version to retain the clean factory look to the conversion. If your dash displays the outside temp, the system is active.
  11. 1 point
    Just get your car's option code list and check the codes against the master list here:
  12. 1 point
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
    Pelican Parts sells a book called "101 Projects" which shows in detail many servicing tasks in detail. pelicanparts.com.
  15. 1 point
    Refer to my first graph above; what concerns me is that you are not getting a true nearly flat line from the rear O2 sensor and a rhythmic sine wave like curve from the front sensor, yours are showing a bounce that should not be there. You could have fouled cats.
  16. 1 point
    Fuse 16 in the left fuse support. In many cases, it is not the fuse but a bad horn (or horns). The factory horns are not very good.
  17. 1 point
  18. 1 point
    I received a call from Jake and he said they started assembly work on the motor this week. Right on schedule with the dates he gave me back in August. Pictures coming soon.
  19. 1 point
  20. 1 point
    I am not 100% certain, but if you take off the plastic trim cover covering the hood latch, you should be able to see everything. You pull the interior cover back a bit to reach the bolts that hold the hood latch to the frame. It is all pretty straight forward from there.
  21. 1 point
    That's the vent line from the oil/coolant heat exchanger #30 here.
  22. 1 point
    I don't think there should be bolts in there. I happen to still have mine open for putting in coilovers. The aluminum plate is what the Bose subwoofer shelf sits on and there doesn't seem to be any bolts/studs coming from it (that would mate with the holes). As for the broken clip - I don't have that on my 2005 C2S as can be seen in my pic. It's been a few months since I took mine apart so I may need some help from you when I put it back together. ?
  23. 1 point
    Yes, it is most likely e-brake if we apply the Occam's razor theory. Brake shoes or any related mechanism might be rusted and not releasing fully, if the car sat for long with the e-brake engaged. If the car was working fine before, then there is a low chance of transmission not sending the power to the rear or psm err. I am pretty sure PSM works thru via calipers, so if the pads are not sticking, then that's not a problem. The long way to verify that e-brake is the issue is to take off the rear calipers, then rear rotors. If the rear wheels move freely after that, then e-brake is the issue. If you don't want to take off the rotors or calipers, you can try engaging/disengaging the parking brake few times, hit the top hat of the rotors with rubber mallet, while trying to move the rotor by hand. You can actually feel if it's parking brake issue if you listen to around the back of the rotor while you try to move the rotor back n forth with hand. You can spray some brake cleaner to the inside of the rotor top hat thru the holes. You can stick a screwdriver through the 5mm hole and rotate the parking brake adjuster to release some tension. You can see this pelican diy article's last three pics to see what I mean. https://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/Porsche-Cayenne/19-BRAKES-Rear_Brake_Rotor_Replacement/19-BRAKES-Rear_Brake_Rotor_Replacement.htm Hope that helps. Keep up updated.
  24. 1 point
    Did this happen after replacing the car battery? With or without Kessy?
  25. 1 point
  26. 1 point
    You can only get IPAS codes from a dealer - and in most cases after showing proof of ownership. Sorry, no shortcuts for those.
  27. 1 point
    I had just read they moved it to under the dash right when you posted, thank you. Found out from the inspector that the car doesn't run cause.....it doesn't have a battery. DUH
  28. 1 point
    OK, then you need to start looking at other suspects. There are a series of hammer in plugs, much like freeze out plugs, in your engine's oiling system; one of these may have popped loose. It find it without taking the engine apart (which you may end up doing anyway, depending upon where it is), you need to connect an oil filled pressure chamber to the oiling system and then pressure the oil backwards into the system, looking for where the oil comes pouring out.
  29. 1 point
  30. 1 point
    As I understand it, a PDK transmission requires both a transmission fluid change and clutch fluid change. The clutch fluid change needs to be carried out twice as often as the transmission fluid. If your problem is not software-related, I'd hazard a guess at a clutch fluid change being necessary. Odd that a Porsche dealer would state that a clunking PDK was "fine and normal" !
  31. 1 point
    So I replaced my throttle body on the weekend and did the reset on it, started it up. Ran great for 2 days. Last night on the way home the idle started to drop off then jump up and stabilize, but the car was still responsive. This morning started ok, idled a little rough, then after a few 100 meters the unresponsiveness started up again. Same exact problem I had before. Items replaced to date: ignition switch, cam sensors and throttle body. I would appreciate any input on possible next steps. It must be something electrical/intermittent because it comes and goes? Could it be my MAF sensor? gas pedal? ignition coil? fuel injectors? Is there a way to determine what is happening with my Durametric?
  32. 1 point
    Started a DIY to replace my water pump today. Got the airbox out and was about to remove my s-belt. Used a 24mm socket to crack right on the tensioner pulley and that's the problem... it did not move over and loosen the play of the s-belt. In fact, it just turns left and/or right w/o moving the pulley at all. Felt behind the pulley and found a nut to tighten from behind but could not get any of my openbox wrenches to fit in that tight space. Need some shorter wrenches to get in there... Looks like a 16mm(someone please confirm) but wondering if anyone else ran into this issue re the t-pulley and if it's just a matter of tightening(is there a proper torque setting) the front and back(nut and screw) or do I need to be mindful of something... BTW, I replaced my s-belt last year. The tensioner worked properly then... so wondering if I may have cracked on it too hard previously and loosen it... hope it's not a stripped issue. Car is an '08 997.1S with 51K miles. On a side note: I couldn't find my mechanics extending mirror... had to brake into my wife's make-up bag for a small mirror to get back there. You guess it... she came out to check on me and caught me with her "compact" inside the engine compartment. Not a good day for the weekend mechanic.
  33. 1 point
    Our experience is exactly opposite; we see vehicles after someone has used the wrong fluids and they have either crapped out after very few miles, or were never the correct spec in the first place, often resulting in catastrophic damage. These gearboxes are ridiculously expensive just to buy either new or used, much less the labor costs to pull and replace. Porsche does not sell parts for them, only complete gearboxes, and very few shops have the tooling or expertise to work on them. In my world, using another lubricant without fully understanding its specs is running a very large risk on something that can bite you big time directly in your wallet.
  34. 1 point
    Or you can download them here: http://rennkit.com/home/service-manual/
  35. 1 point
    You need to connect a switched ignition supply to the blue/white wire on the Connects2 adapter plug. This is the 'wake up' signal for the amplifier. Most people splice into the aerial amplifier feed in the black power plug (The white wire, IIRC).
  36. 1 point
    It may just be the oil seal ring has failed on the chain tensioner (very large nut in the left center of the picture). While the fix is cheap (replace the seal), you need to put the engine at TDC, lock it, and use cam locks to hold everything in position while removing the tensioner to replace the seal:
  37. 1 point
    Yes, the Tip controller can not switch the valve if it is off (fuse removed) - nor can the vacuum valve switch with the engine off.
  38. 1 point
    So, I'm going to update this thread as I go along in case anyone else needs this info going forward. Although there are a lot of "radio" threads out there it appears that the vast majority of Cayenne buyers got the Bose sound package and thus I could not find conclusive information so here goes: My '05 Cayenne base does not have the bose sound upgrade package and does not have an amp, just a fiber optic connected CD changer. (translation: the MOST system in my Cayenne is only utilized for the CD changer) Basics: if the speakers don't have the Bose logo you probably don't have bose. The CD changer is located in the rear right cargo behind pull off panel. My understanding is a non-bose amp would be located above the CD changer, that space can be viewed with a flashlight at the correct angle. Original radio is the CDR-23 single din. The back of the radio has three plugs (the top with three wires is the steering controls, the middle with 8 wires are the speakers, the bottom with three wires is the power/antenna). In addition there is the antenna connection on the far left and a pair of FIBER OPTIC cables. In this setup, the Fiber Optics cables run directly to the CD changer and that appears to be it. I unplugged the fiber optic behind the radio and EVERYTHING works fine (radio, steering controls, dash still shows the station/song). The CD changer obviously does not work but the CD slot on the head unit does work. With 8 speaker wires in the back of the radio, it is evident these are running straight to the speakers, confirmed by the fact that no amp was found. Also, called Becker and they confirmed that some becker units are not programmed to be used with an amp and most cars with an amp use a smaller yellow plug in the middle slot instead of the 8 speaker wires. So for the Radio swap all I need is a new head unit and wiring harness, essentially it is now plug and play (thank you previous owner for only getting the basic radio option). After some back and forth with a few car stereo and online sellers, the correct harness appears to be the Connects2 model CTSPO001 and is about a US$100 part. This does include steering wheel controls which would negate the need to buy the US$50 ASWC-1 part. (so essentially 50 for the basic harness and 50 for the steering controls) The fiber optic plug will just be taped off behind the unit since I have no need for the CD changer (definitely not spending 500 for a fiber connection to tie it in), they also sell a fiber optic loop connection for 10-25 so I might do that just in case its better to have the fiber loop closed. Other parts that are easily identified elsewhere: dash trim by Metra 95-9600, another one by Connects2 CT23PO01. Antenna is 40-EU10 but it appears there are a couple almost identical to choose but know once hooked up. Since the speaker wires are behind the head unit it would be easy to setup an amp in the front of the vehicle or possibly under the hood since any wires (power/speakers) wouldn't have to be routed all the way to the back of the vehicle. Parts are all on order, will update when everything is connected.
  39. 1 point
    Dave, As Silver said, it should not be too difficult to track down the problem(s). All you need is a $15 multimeter. Run your engine till warm and the low voltage shows up, then let it idle and turn on the a/c and the low beam. The current draw from the alternator should now be ~50A. You can then do the following tests. I drew a diagram with the corresponding parts. Test #1: check voltage drop between point "C" (alternator casing) and "B-" (call that V(C, B-)). Note "B+' and "B-" are the actual battery terminals, not the cable connectors on the terminals. This test shows total voltage lost between the alternator and the battery on the ground side. Expect 0.2v or less. If your ground strap is bad, it will show up in this test. Test #2: check V(A, B+) where "A" = alternator output at the back of the alternator that you can't see (use an inspection mirror) and expect ~0.5v or less. "A" is hard to get to. I fabricated a J-shape hook using a stiff insulated wire and just literally probe it blindly from behind. Wear protective goggles here since you will be close to the drive belt, a hot engine, and the always LIVE "A". This test shows total voltage lost between the alternator and the battery on the power side. Test #3: check V(A, J) and expect ~0.2v. This tests #21, which is the infamous cable that can corrode and Porsche has also revised it. Test #4: check V(J, B+) and expect ~0.3v or less. Test #5: check V(A, C), your alternator output and expect 13.5v or higher. Your problem is gonna show up in one of the tests above.
  40. 1 point
    Cabriolet: Removable windbreak that reduces air turbulence for driver/passenger while also serving as a cover for back-seat luggage. Easy to attach, and can easily be stowed in a protective cover in the trunk; or Coupe: Front lip on your sunroof.
  41. 1 point
    Well, we had another round of rain of biblical proportions last night (inches in an hour sort of rain..) so this AM I checked the P!G. I found the floor wet again. Not as wet as prior wetness, but for sure wet. I pried up the carpet and the foam was again wet, but it appeared my drain had worked, the wet wasn't up as high, and not as much got wet. Spent some quality time with towels wringing out the foam and drying it off again. So - it appears that heavy rain causes the leak (and perhaps the HVAC contributed..) So I started tearing things apart looking for the source. I first popped off the fuse cover and the trim next to it on the starboard side, to find: Hmm.. drips. Then I looked further and saw: More drips. They're appearing from behind the A-pillar trim piece (at the top of the photo..) The drips appeared to be travelling down the inside surface of the A-pillar inside trim. The path followed down past the fuse box and behind the right side kickpanel under the dash, right into the foam backing of the carpeting. I decided to look further upstream. To do so - I had to remove the A-pillar trim. This is actually rather easy. I had already popped off the little trim piece near the fuse box cover, and I went looking for what holds the A-pillar trim in place. Found it - one long T25 screw under the "AIRBAG" logo on the trim: After removing this screw, you can easily pull the trim out from the top down - pull it toward the center of the windshield to release some stab-clips on the back, and it then slides up and out from next to the dash. Quite easy actually (and a good time to tidy up any wiring that had been tucked behind it.) There is a side-curtain airbag there, so use a bit of caution (don't jam screwdrivers willy-nilly in behind it.) This is what's found once that trim is removed: You can see the path the drain hose takes. It's quite well protected, and there was no sign of leakage on the outside of the hose, so I suspected that up higher in the hose wasn't a problem (but decided to look anyway.) I next took the trim piece off the sunvisor mounting and two T20 screws behind it, which allows pulling the headliner corner down a bit. The actual mount stays attached to the headliner and no wiring has to be disconnected. If I could have figured out how to remove the passenger assist handle in the roof I could have pulled the headliner down even further, but as was, it came down far enough that with a Maglite LED flashlight I could see the hose all the way into the drain fitting for the sunroof drain: All looked good on the drain hose. No tears, no sign of wetness. I went up top, opening the sunroof and looking around, and found there was leaf-munge in the drain area and on the tracks of the sunroof mechanism. I used my high-pressure air-gun to clean the crap out (after using my fingers to get the big stuff out - and there was some crap blocking the drain.) It turns out, if the drain is plugged and enough water gets into the area (I did an experiment with a pitcher of water), it will overflow around the edge of the sunroof, and the headliner happily routes it right down the A pillar trim with the plastic backing of the trim keeping it flowing nicely down past the fusebox and out eventually to soak the floor. Lesson - clean sunroof drains. I blew them out, then checked again with a pitcher of water, and the water happily ran out the bottom of the truck, and none appeared along the drain line, or dribbling down the headliner. Here is the rough location of the drain as seen from up top. It's actually almost (not quite, but almost, you'll need a good Maglite to see it) impossible to see due to the wind-dam popup in the sunroof housing. While I was in the area, I cleaned up the fuzzy edge of the sunroof gasket (it had hardened munge on it) and where it meets the body (which also had hardened munge on it) in the hope that the gasket seals better. I'm awaiting the next rainstorm (doesn't look like it will be a real long wait - probably tomorrow) to see if this actually helped anything. Thanks to RFM for suggesting I check the sunroof drain. Biggest trick is getting so you can see it.
  42. 1 point
    Here's a picture of the culprit. This was the original voltage regulator taken from my alternator and replaced with the part I mentioned above (that also works in various other cars like VW, Mercedes, etc). I can't say what caused what, but it turns out that my wiring harness that runs from the alternator to the starter to a junction block was also bad and was causing resistance when it heated up (I believe there's a TSB related to this). Thanks to JFP in PA who was a huge help tracking this down and told me that these two parts can sometimes go out together. I saw Logray and some others had this problem too in the past (see link below) so that was helpful too. It's been 100+ degrees F here for the last few weeks so it's not surprising that if it was going to happen, it would happen now. http://www.renntech.... guage harness Also, FYI, in response to my own question above: The "Battery / Generator" warning message and accompanying battery light on the console goes on when the computer detects that the voltage is too low. It's not something that is "tripped" and it will go off once the battery is recharged and the alternator issues are fixed, therefore keeping the battery charged. This can also happen if you leave your light on or door open in the car too long and it drains the battery. Just take it for a spirited drive to let the alternator charge the battery or hook the battery up to a charger if it gets too low to crank the starter. Thank you! :renntech:
  43. 1 point
    As an FYI for others... 16mm bolt on the back of the tensioner pulley can be tighten as you torque the 24mm socket of the tensioner pulley to solve this issue. I used a stubby 16mm open box wrench to accomplish this by wedging it against the tensioner arm. Apply Just enough torque to get it from freely turning on it's own.
  44. 1 point
    Could someone take a photo of the drain in the car - perhaps hold your SmartPhone under the car and push the button? I looked on my Ti edition this AM and couldn't find the drains. I suspect they may be covered by the sill-trim that is added for the Ti edition (and I believe the GTS and mebbe the turbo, or at least some turbos..) That trim doesn't look easy to remove. A photo would make this all clear to us simple minded people who can't find the **** things.. Thanks!
  45. 1 point
    Vincent, I just got her running and it was the Pulse Sender (aka Crankshaft Position Sensor) and it is called a "Impulse sender" at Pelican Parts. Odd I had no faults on the Durametric? Item Name Item Price Quantity Item Total --------- ---------- -------- ---------- 986-606-112-02-M14 $131.75 1 $131.75 Impulse Sender, Boxster 986 (1997-2004), Brand: Bosch -m
  46. 1 point
    P0171 Oxygen Sensing Adaptation, Idle Range, Bank 1 – Above Limit P0174 Oxygen Sensing Adaptation, Idle Range, Bank 2 – Above Limit Possible fault causes: - Incorrect signal from MAF sensor - Intake air system leaking - Fuel pressure too low - Volume supply of fuel pump too low - Fuel injectors fouled - PCV valve leaks - Cap of oil filler neck not closed correctly or seal is damaged Looks like you have a leak...
  47. 1 point
    I found it hard to believe as well, until i dug a little deeper. Turns out, theres this option for something LIKE a LSD... on cars with the stability management option, apparently the computer already has alot of control over the brakes. so what it can do is take constant measurements of both rear wheels, and apply a tweak of brake to the spinning one. on a conventional open differential, this makes more torque goto the other wheel. it does this so fast and so well, if you dump the clutch (with PSM off) it will leave two black marks... if you have one wheel off in the sand and the other on the road, you wont get stuck, etc... but heres the nicer part.. at higher speeds, (45mph according to Lorens post above) it doesnt do it.. so you can get the excelent high speed cornering of an open diff, while still being able to snap the back around with the throttle when autocrossing... just like a LSD. add to that, the open diff weighs less..(and its rotating mass) and the system adds no weight, as the hardware already must exist for the ABS... it becomes a software-only upgrade at that point. its a very cool little feature.
  48. 1 point
    Ok here we go: vehicle: Porsche Cayenne S 2004 (Halogen Headlights - No Air Suspenssions - No Headlights washers) Factory halogens headlight part no. bi-xenon headlight part no. Before start i have to remove the orange look of the headlight... Done! Things you need to know... you DON`T need the bixenon wire harness (part no. 955 631 239 10) to make the bixenon headlights work. I re-wire the internal of the bi-xenon headlight. * The only diference are: 1) bi-xenon have an extra light called (cornering) i tap this to the xenon wires, every time the xenons turn on both cornerin lights goes on. ALSO this prevent the computer detect a problem whit the low bean xenon ballast. 2) I tap the bi-xenon shuttle whit the auxiliary high beam lights, if i don`t have the xenons on and i flash the high beams, only the auxiliary and the shuttle goes on, NOT the xenon. there is a resistor in the shuttle that you can remove (more details next...) * Start 1) Take out both headlights (Please see manual for more info) 2) Take the 3 covers out 3) Remove the Autoleveling motor (remove the 3 pin harness and two bolts) from the Halogen headlight 4) You have to take out the Pin conector, to do this insert a plastic (Use an old Credit card, cut it in two and then resize it to 3cm wide) insert the plastic at the top and bottom inside the housing make sure it reach the end and then pull out the connector (This is a pain in the a..) 5) Once the connector is out start to cut each terminar as long as you can, NOTE: don`t cut the 3 pin connector in this harness you will use this whit the autoleveling motor in the bi-xenon headlight. in the end you will have this: 6) Say bye bye to the halogen headlight... don`t be panic now... 7) Remove the 3 covers in the bi-xenon headlights 8) Now remove the Autoleving motor (remove the 5 pin harness and two bolts), then install the 3 pin Autoleveling motor Side by side (Left Halogen 3 pin, Right bi-xenon 5 pin)
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
    If you have not figured it out yet. The vent is held in with 2 locking clips. You press down on the clips and the vent pulls out. Jeff
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