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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/16/2019 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    A couple of days ago my head unit started cycling off and on every minute or so. I found some posts that these things are notorious for failing so I started looking for a place that would repair it. Luckily I found the Becker office in Saddle Brook NJ, called them, and they emailed me instructions how to fix it. Apparently my XM SAT provider caused the problem. It required a reboot as per below: WARNING It was brought to our attention, that the PCM 3.0 and 3.1 units have been rebooting continuously on a number of Porsche vehicles at the moment. It seems that a signal was sent by SiriusXM which has caused this issue. SiriusXM and Porsche are investigating currently and are working on a fix. VERY Important: Please DO NOT replace any parts or hardware on a vehicle, due to this issue. In order to rectify this issue, you will perform a “PCM handover” (also known as a PCM Hard Reset). Instructions are listed below; Press and hold the PCM>>Info button for approximately 10 seconds until the PCM reboots. Immediately select the following from the PCM; CAR>>OPTION>>Set PCM System>>Reset PCM>>Vehicle Handover>>Yes>>Yes These instructions can also be found in the respective Owner’s Manuals for affected vehicles. Hopefully this may prevent Dealership / workshop visits. If your vehicle is already at the workshop, recommend that the technician update it to the latest available software level. **PLEASE NOTE: Performing a PCM Hard Reset will also erase all of the radio presets and Bluetooth connections and these will have to be reentered by you after the reset.** In order to rectify this issue, you will perform a “PCM handover” (also known as a PCM Hard Reset). Instructions are listed below; Press and hold the PCM>>Info button for approximately 10 seconds until the PCM reboots. Immediately select the following from the PCM; CAR>>OPTION>>Set PCM System>>Reset PCM>>Vehicle Handover>>Yes>>Yes WARNING Reboot for PCM 3.1.docx WARNING Reboot for PCM 3.1.pdf
  2. 2 points
    OK, first of all, either twisting wires together and wrapping them with tape, or using wire nuts is totally unacceptable for automotive applications. Both are pathways to shorts and even fires. Wires should be reconnected with crimp connectors at a minimum, with soldering them and then using heat shrink tubing to cover the soldered joints the actual preferred method. Most likely, in the process of doing this swap, you disturbed something, but exactly what is hard to say, particularly as the previous owner used the twisted wire and tape wrap method of connecting things. It is entirely possible that you may have pulled another such "MacGyver" like repair loose that is not related to the radio swap. Probably the best approach at this juncture is to get the vehicle scanned with a Porsche specific scan tool to see what the various communication modules are doing. Good luck with this one.
  3. 2 points
    Hi guys, I bought my 1999 Porsche 911 C4 Tiptronic back in January and I've been doing little projects on it ever since. I used to have a 2016 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack with a 6.4 liter V8 that I traded in last summer, but I was missing the sports car feeling too much so decided to buy the Porsche. One of the things that stood out to me on the test drive was just how sluggish and unresponsive the Tiptronic gearbox felt compared to the one I had in the Dodge. Since the rest of the car was in very good condition (invoices for every oil change & repair going back to 2003, IMS bearing changed, etc.) I decided to buy it anyway, assuming I would get used to having to mash my foot into the carpet everytime I wanted the thing to move. Looking through this forum and others, I heard about the Sprint Booster and how it might help with this problem. For those of you that don't know what this is, it is a small plug that sits between the gas pedal and the cable harness running to the ECU and that changes the signal sent to the car from the position of the gas pedal. The factory set up makes it so that when you push the gas pedal, the revs rise very slowly for the first 50% of pedal travel. I think I read somewhere that halfway down, the pedal will only give you about 25% of the power. This means that in order to get the Tiptronic box to do a downward shift, you really REALLY have to mash the pedal and do it in a quick manner. In general it makes the whole car feel unresponsive and not at all like the free-revving, happy sports car I thought I was getting. The Sprint Booster module (which only works on cars with electronic throttle control or "e-gas" pedal) will take the gas pedal input and modulate it to reflect a more aggressive pedal action. The only thing that changes really is the voltage that is sent to the car's ECU, and how this is calculated in relationship to the position of the gas pedal. The unit comes with a little control gadget where you can set it to one of three basic settings - Factory (simple pass-through, nothing changes from stock), Sport (about a 30% more aggressive response), and Race (about 50% more aggressive). Within both Sport and Race you can then fine tune with an additional setting from 1-9 for each of the two categories. By default the device will put you in "5" or the middle ground. The device costs you about $300 and there is no discount to be had from any of your typical market places. I simply bought mine directly at the manufacturer's website. Since it was my birthday last week, I decided to treat myself and see if it might work. You have a 30-day money back guarantee and the install process is completely reversible, so I figured I'd give it a go. If it actually helps make my tiptronic feel peppy it will have been worth every penny. If not, I'll just return it. For the installation my first problem was figuring out if my particular car had an e-gas or electronic throttle system or not. Looking at the gas pedal I can see a cable running up the bulkhead so I wasn't feeling too optimistic. With the help of others on this forum, I learned that all 996's have e-gas except the 98-99 C2. I also popped the hood and looked at the throttle body itself. To be extra sure, I also asked the vendor to confirm that my particular model would work with the product. The manufacturer's website only shows MY 2000 and beyond as approved for installation, but they came back and confirmed that in fact the -99 C4 does have e-gas and so I could proceed with the purchase. 3-4 days later I get the box in the mail. It is a tiny little thing and doesn't appear to be much for the $300 I paid for it, but whatever. The installation manual shows pictures of the device being plugged into a port located somewhere on the gas pedal assembly itself. It is clearly the most common spot for most manufacturers to link the throttle to the ECU, but that's not the case in a Porsche 996. The gas pedal pulls on a cable and if you follow the cable up from the pedal, you'll see it attaching to a metal box conveniently located under the actual dashboard, and at an impossible angle for any human being to get to. In these cases I like to resort to child labor, so I bribed my 13-year old son to help me. By laying upside down in the driver's seat and sticking his head + one arm under the dashboard, he was able to get the device plugged in correctly in as little as 2 hours. I was basically reduced to cheer leader, and voice of reason to guide his efforts. We made use of my cell phone camera to try and figure out from the pictures how to disconnect the old plug and get the new Sprint Booster in place. The pictures attached to this post will show you how we figured it out: The entire installation process is done by touch and feel as you cannot see any of the components directly. I would recommend our approach of using a camera, talking about what we need to do next, and then use your fingers & imagination to figure out what it is that you are doing. We found it helpful to start with where the cable attaches to the box, then run your fingers over until you hit the little metal flange that sticks out with the white plastic butt underneath it. When you have your hand there you know that the plug itself is just above it. After the initial installation we immediately took the vehicle out for a ride. The gas pedal felt weird, and we had intermittent revving and a noticeable delay when pressing the pedal. I figured it was simply down to the device having to calibrate itself so we went for a ride. 20 minutes in we get a check engine light come on so we headed back to the garage. Ever the optimist, I simply disconnected the battery to reset the CEL and then went out for another drive. This second time it worked beautifully! The car felt like a different animal all together, and the gas response was crisp and immediate. Problem solved, or so I thought, and we called it a day. The second day I went for a drive and got not only a CEL but also the PSM and ABS warning lights. At this time I was ready to call it a day and send the device back since I don't want to have to deal with buggy electronics or stuff that I can't trust. Called up the son again to have him pull everything out and that's when he noticed that the OEM male connector at the end came lose by simply touching it. Turns out we hadn't been able to plug it in all the way until it latched onto the Sprint Booster module. I guess it is not manufactured to the same tight spec as the OEM stuff, and by a fraction of a millimeter the plug can't go in far enough to secure it with the latches. Using force and patience, we eventually managed to push it all the way in until we heard the very satisfying "click" of the plug latching onto the module. If I have to take it off again because it comes loose, I will certainly use a file to remove a bit of material on each latch and ensure that they lock into place without having to push too hard. Since this point I have driven the car 4-5 times and about 50 miles, driving it as I usually do and without holding back in any way. No CEL or other warning lights and the thing runs really well. Having tried the different settings, I have decided to leave it in Sport-5 which I think is a happy medium for a sporty feel without compromising the ability to drive smoothly when you want to. Race mode makes it more binary, and it is like mashing the pedal at every stop light. It might be fun on a track, but for everyday driving it is just too aggressive. In Sport-5 it'll pull away softly in 2nd gear like it did with the factory settings, but if you simply give the pedal a little shove it'll immediately downshift to 1st gear and take off with gusto. All in all I have to say that this was very much worth it. The car feels different - more sporty and responsive, just like you'd want a Porsche to feel like. I know this doesn't add any power to the engine but just by having the Tiptronic gearbox work more like a modern sports car it really changes everything. I'm now planning on driving it for the full 30-day money back period, and if I run into any issue I will post an update to this forum. Cheers, Magnus Update - April 22nd, 2020: I've now driven with the Sprint Booster for 6 weeks and I can honestly say that this was the best bang for the buck modification that I've done to my Porsche. I would rate my Alpine head unit & speaker system upgrade as the mod that I most appreciate, but that was $2,400 and this was only $300. Just be careful with the installation and count on it being a PITA...
  4. 2 points
    You should not have to - unless you hooked up the new battery backwards. If the polarity was hooked up correctly then you need to start looking for poor grounds. Starting with the battery cable then chassis grounds.
  5. 2 points
    Welcome to RennTech On cabriolets, the number 2 relay panel is mounted to the rear of the roll over protection frame. You need to put the top in the "service" position to gain access to it.
  6. 2 points
    Are you sure you don't have fuses mixed up? I'm currently on 1 pump in my CS with fuse 14 pulled and can hear the right side pump running/whinning when the car is on. I think Fuse #14 is for the driver side pump and #13 is the right pass side pump, but feel free to correct me If I'm wrong USA
  7. 1 point
  8. 1 point
  9. 1 point
    I'm not sure. I've heard it's best to stick with a Porsche branded pump (rather than even the OEM Pierburg).
  10. 1 point
  11. 1 point
    Forgot to make final update. The car is up and running well. To summarize, had to replace multiple parts: broken plastic pipes that the splintered serpentine belt broke (3 of them by radiator) Repair coolant leak at back of engine (where the coolant vent Y line connects to the rubber hose) Replace power steering pulley (cracked when I installed replacement belt, you guessed it, ruined the belt too) Belt tensioner Belt tentioner pulley Replace serpentine belt itself, twice (first replacement split once power steering pulley broke Replaced valve cover seals Replaced cracked coolant splitter pipe (going into front of engine) Replace oil cooler pipe (since it came with part #6 already) Repaired a cracked wiring harness for injector #2 (was damaged during the job - brittle and one wire frayed, shorting the wire to other side of injector harness - bad thing - battery short) Most of it was very easy, just time consuming to get to, as cayenne turbo is famous for stuffing all sorts of ungodly wires all in a tiny space. Hardest part was waiting for the parts to arrive, after issues diagnosed. After I repaired everything, car would not start. Thought it was battery, but turned out to be injector wire shorting. Once I rewrapped harness, issue went away and all great. Battery was also leaking slightly so I had it replaced with new one under warranty. DONE. Now, have few small sensor things to replace and it will be better than new.
  12. 1 point
    Auto's en lichte commerciële voertuigen AFTERMARKET.ZF.COM Personenauto's This is the catalog of the transmission manufacturer, country and language can be changed if necessary.
  13. 1 point
    I finished a full cylinder replacement using LN Engineering Nickies 3.8 L kit last year that cost $6k in parts and machine services. I did the assembly work. It was a great education in 996 mechanics and special tools. Definitely not for the faint of heart! Looking back I should have done the heads at the same time so that I could call it a full rebuild. It took about 3 months total. Keith 2003 996
  14. 1 point
    Likely a bad pump or leaking lines.
  15. 1 point
    Definitely redneck, but it worked a treat. Hope the pictures make sense. The tape was left stationary so you can see the support post is slightly offset to one side.
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
    Nice stance. How thick are the rear spacers?
  18. 1 point
    Welcome to RennTech It is under the car on the transmission, replacement procedure: http://www.locodemoto.com/transfer/Replacing-Reverse-Lights-Back-Up-Lights-Switch.pdf
  19. 1 point
  20. 1 point
    They are welded, need to grind it off from below, drill 8mm hole, fit the replacement by welding it underneath to the body. Stud should be M6, normally that would be 10mm socket for the nut. Tightening torque is 6.5ftlb.
  21. 1 point
  22. 1 point
  23. 1 point
    Resolved - I accidentally installed the flap backwards.
  24. 1 point
    P1666 Overrun Recirculating Air Valve - Signal Implausible Possible cause of fault - Overrun recirculating air valve stuck in closed position at times (due to ice) - Overrun recirculating air valve faulty
  25. 1 point
    Thank you - there is a "Donate" link at the top and bottom of every page.
  26. 1 point
    996 Ignition Switch replace (just the switch) with pictures First off - thanks to everyone who has been down this road before me for providing tips and suggestions and troubleshooting regarding this common problem. I have been dealing with a key that would stay all the way to the right upon starting meaning that the A/C, heated seats and some other items would not function. My solution had been to simply start the car and then just move the key back one notch to the left and everything worked fine. So if others have that issue, my original solution Author scb71 Category Carrera (996) - Common Fixes and Repairs Submitted 09/16/2009 01:31 PM Updated 03/13/2017 05:24 AM  
  27. 1 point
  28. 1 point
    Guys, enough with the weird work around Magiver repairs; if you cannot drill the bolt and remove it, you need to drill out the insert and install a new one, but this time put some antiseize on the fasteners and this will never happen again.
  29. 1 point
  30. 1 point
    OK, let's start with the obvious: P0133 and P1275 both indicate that the O2 sensor ahead of the three way cat on bank 1 has aged out and needs replacing. I would get that done, clear all the codes and see if anything returns. Some of the other codes (P1126) indicate mixture issues and a possible vacuum leak, but with the O2 sensor out of wack may just be ghost codes.
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
    Porsche has gone rather stiff necked about adding options post delivery. If memory serves, you have to have the clock, and pay Porsche to recode the car as having both. Most dealers seem to charge the exact amount you would have laid out to have it as a factory option. Not a pretty situation, but then you are dealing with Porsche...…...
  33. 1 point
    New member here. This is a great site with loads of useful information, so thank you! I recently bought my dream car, finally, a 2007 997.1 turbo with Tip with 27k. Long story short, I bought the car and had it serviced right before winter. However, after the service which included an oil change, code P0021 came up for the first time. I took it back to the dealer and they cleared the code and told me this happens at times after an oil change. I drove the car for a few more weeks until the weather changed and the CEL light never returned, until yesterday. Again, because of the weather, the car has been sitting for a few months and I just took the car out. It ran perfect all-day long. Then the very next morning, I take the car out and about 5 min into the drive the CEL light comes on with "Visit your local shop" or something to that affect. My OBD reader indicates Code: P0021 - camshaft position over-advanced bank 2. 1 - Should I clear the code and see if the code returns, or should I have someone look further into it? 2 - I was going to clear the code and see if it comes back like previously noted by the dealer but wanted to acquire some more experienced thoughts on this. Car seems to run, idle, and drive perfectly fine. Any thoughts or guidance on what to do next would be greatly appreciated! Sorry for the long post. Thanks in advance for you guidance!
  34. 1 point
    2002 911 C4S Six speed manual When driving my recent purchase, the oil pressure gauge reads "5" whenever the tach goes 2500 rpm or above in any gear. This is when it is still warming up or at operating temperature (180), after at least 30 minutes on the road. Needless to say, I've been keeping the car below 2500 as much as I can. At idle, it registers between 2-3 after reaching operating temps. Last week, I had the Porsche shop remove the oil pan and check it for any detritus during the PPI. It was clean. Then they proceeded to put on a new filter and oil. I've checked the oil level in the morning, and it registers a smidgen over max, however, the computer level always registers a 1 bar over max, whether hot or cold. Would a faulty oil level sensor affect the oil pressure reading? I've read the oil pressure sensor can be wonky. I don't have enough miles in this car to really know it yet. It's, obviously, a bit frustrating to keep this car in check while driving right now, but I'd rather cautious. The owner's manual I have says the oil pressure should be approximately 3-4 bars at 5000rpm at operating temperature. Any thoughts? Or direction to go?
  35. 1 point
    To my knowledge, Porsche did not use that measurement as spec on these engines. Instead, they had specs for overall valve length from tip to tip as 110.1 +/- 0.1MM on the intakes and 109+/- 0.1MM on the exhausts, and installed valve spring heights on valves that passed the overall spec at 36.7 +/- 0.3MM intakes and 35.7 +/- 0.3MM exhausts as measured from the spring seat to the bottom of the spring retainer.
  36. 1 point
    Tape...find the ground wire and wrap some tape around the connector. That means it is not connected to anything. Originally the brown ground wire was connected to the radio chassis. Now what you want to do is disconnect the ground wire and wrap some tape around the connector so it is not touching anything.
  37. 1 point
    Unless your fault code is exactly the same as the original poster you are likely just guessing. Best to get a Porsche fault code reader and see what your fault code(s) are.
  38. 1 point
    PM me your VIN and I will lookup your options.
  39. 1 point
    It's fun to see after nearly a decade my original procedure is still going strong...if not hard to find! Wish I had all those old school files presented in a way better! I miss my 986 and hope to be back in one in the near future...just hope I don't need to cut open the air box again!
  40. 1 point
    Porsche stopped publishing their service manuals around 2004 and switched to an online subscription service for those without a PIWIS unit (it is included with the PIWIS), so there are no reliable sources for legitimate PDF files. Part numbers you can get online from sources like board sponsors Sunset Porsche’s parts website. The Durametric system is hands down the best aftermarket diagnostic tool for Porsche.
  41. 1 point
    Greetings to 981 Forum members. (This posting is revised to correct the year and model of my friends Boxster GTS.)(and again to note car is a 981.) I have a friend who went to Germany and came home with a 2015 Boxster GTS. He has asked me about new tires and I could only tell him about my adventures with my 911SC and 996 C4S. What is the current thought re putting new tires on the Boxster? Anyone? Anyone? Does anyone have a positive, or for that matter a negative opinion, on replacement tires. My friend intends to put on 4 tires and I've advised him not to mix and match manufacturers. I run Michelin PS2's, N3, on my C4S and like them way better than any others. Cheers to all...
  42. 1 point
    And to answer your question, updating firmware does not require new maps. Porsche updated me from 1.44 to FW 1.47 for free while I waited. Took like 10 minutes. This is when I was told that while the newer PCM 3.0 FW exists, 1.47 is the newest for the Cayenne. 2009 Cayenne S
  43. 1 point
  44. 1 point
  45. 1 point
    The Boxster has 6 drains to check. They are black and look like little donuts or grommets. There are 2 in the front on either side of the battery and 4 in the back. Raise your clamshell and you will see one at the bottom on either side of the black plastic liner. Easily seen when you have the top part way open and there's also one on either side of the channel almost below the front tip of the clamshell by the door jam. Here is a link to Mike Focke's website with more info regarding Boxster drains. https://sites.google.com/site/mikefocke2/drainsdiagram
  46. 1 point
    Because the Tip uses an oil to water cooler mounted on the side of the gearbox instead of running trans fluid lines all the way to the radiators, there is literally no way to use a power flushing system on them. So you are limited to draining 3-4 liters out when you drain the pan and swap out the filter. Doing multiple refills and dumps will help clean out a trans that has not been serviced properly for some time. Once you have got the system cleaned out, a better regimen would be to do at least an annual trans fluid dump (changing the filter every other year), so that you are constantly replenishing at least some of the fluid and removing some of the collected crud. We do this for several customers every season when he cars are being prepped for winter hibernation.
  47. 1 point
    991-631-155-02 Direction Indicator Light (left) -- US MSRP $32.74 991-631-156-02 Direction Indicator Light (right) -- US MSRP $32.74 Your bulb should already be white so just change out the lens/socket assembly.
  48. 1 point
    Well - more fun last night trying to resolve this problem. When I opened the top the same problem happened - stopped about two inches away from being complete. I found that the plastic shield that is connected to the rearmost strut on the driver's side and carries a wire had become disconnected from the strut - but reattaching the plastic shield made no difference. I looked at all the little wings and flaps and they all look fine, i.e., the left and right sides are in the same position, and there is nothing obviously fouling the clamshell. I joggled the clamshell a little and did manage to get it to close - but only once. I'm nervous about too much joggling seeing so interconnected this whole system is. So...I'm now thinking that some mechanical resistance has developed that the clamshell motor is not able to overcome - but this does not seem to jibe with the fact that the clamshell closes fine when going into the "roof closed" position.
  49. 1 point
    The pink, yellow, and, green plugs. Do they have a part #?
  50. 1 point
    Ok here we go: vehicle: Porsche Cayenne S 2004 (Halogen Headlights - No Air Suspenssions - No Headlights washers) Factory halogens headlight part no. bi-xenon headlight part no. Before start i have to remove the orange look of the headlight... Done! Things you need to know... you DON`T need the bixenon wire harness (part no. 955 631 239 10) to make the bixenon headlights work. I re-wire the internal of the bi-xenon headlight. * The only diference are: 1) bi-xenon have an extra light called (cornering) i tap this to the xenon wires, every time the xenons turn on both cornerin lights goes on. ALSO this prevent the computer detect a problem whit the low bean xenon ballast. 2) I tap the bi-xenon shuttle whit the auxiliary high beam lights, if i don`t have the xenons on and i flash the high beams, only the auxiliary and the shuttle goes on, NOT the xenon. there is a resistor in the shuttle that you can remove (more details next...) * Start 1) Take out both headlights (Please see manual for more info) 2) Take the 3 covers out 3) Remove the Autoleveling motor (remove the 3 pin harness and two bolts) from the Halogen headlight 4) You have to take out the Pin conector, to do this insert a plastic (Use an old Credit card, cut it in two and then resize it to 3cm wide) insert the plastic at the top and bottom inside the housing make sure it reach the end and then pull out the connector (This is a pain in the a..) 5) Once the connector is out start to cut each terminar as long as you can, NOTE: don`t cut the 3 pin connector in this harness you will use this whit the autoleveling motor in the bi-xenon headlight. in the end you will have this: 6) Say bye bye to the halogen headlight... don`t be panic now... 7) Remove the 3 covers in the bi-xenon headlights 8) Now remove the Autoleving motor (remove the 5 pin harness and two bolts), then install the 3 pin Autoleveling motor Side by side (Left Halogen 3 pin, Right bi-xenon 5 pin)
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