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Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/18/2020 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    I am guessing you need a new passenger door latch mechanism. One of the many microswitches built into the door latch mechanism is faulty. I had some trouble with my drivers side door latch mechanism (not unlocking, not opening, repeatedly had to lock/unlock, window not dropping). I replaced the entire door latch mechanism and now everything works perfectly.
  2. 1 point
  3. 1 point
    Then set your speed limit alarm in your onboard computer.
  4. 1 point
    Excess fuel, Mass air flow sensor dirty, engine temperature sensor faulty, dirty air filters, oxygen sensor faulty. Then go on to check fuel pressure and related items. All engines have blow by and it would be expected the blow by gas will be rich in UN-burnt fuel and oil mist in your case. The AOS will have oil around it including the hose, so when the crankcase has a little pressure then the valve will work sending the oil rich gas to the intake to be burnt ( causing carbon build up on intake valve stems, but that's another story). Look at how the engine knows the correct fuelling, one of those inputs to the ECU is giving the wrong information, I have mentioned a few, find it!
  5. 1 point
    Sounds like stretched cam chain (P0341 Camshaft position sensor 1), needs replaced to fix the rough running. Hotter engine makes the worn chain just that little bit longer to the point where it's way out in timing. Suggest you check the current draw of your starter. If it is very high and causes big voltage drop them maybe you have a bad starter motor. Most diagnostic tools have the crank voltage menu where you can check this.
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  7. 1 point
    When the car came up to temp the DME relay would over heat and fail and the fuel pump would stop running . Installed new DME relay and it runs like a top now.
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  12. 1 point
    I found a neat program that puts the 987 Chrono on your computer desktop. It displays the time and temp. I am also working on getting the workshop manuals to add to the 987 Basic Workshop manuals and 2005 wiring diagrams I have in electronic format. If you are interested email me or PM me Thank you
  13. 1 point
    Yes Dennis, my car will do the same thing unless you put it in launch control. There is always a slight hesitation from a dead stop. Unfortunately the car is geared so tall that driving it like a 911 should be driven will put you in jail. But, never leave the car in default mode. As soon as you start up put in sport mode or drive it manually. The default mode is silliness to keep the mileage numbers down and runs the engine way below where it is happy. What I have learned with my TT S is that there is such a thing as a car being too powerful. In many ways my 2006 manual C4S is more fun to drive. I am considering going for a 992 GTS if it comes with a manual.
  14. 1 point
    Hi. Why go back, is my first question? What head unit do you have? If you want to go back to Porsche head unit, you are talking big $$$$. My Boxster head unit doesnt spit out CD's, a rebuilt repalcement unit is around $3200 + installation. Plus it depends on how the current head unit was installed, wiring-wise? Do you have a Bose system?
  15. 1 point
  16. 1 point
    I have an OBD II reader from Auto Zone for $100 that will cancel a water temp gauge failure, but will not cancel/erace an airbag code. My water temp gauge failure is due to the Porsche computer doesn't recognize my LS3 motor. I also have the Durametric program which does it all. More expensive and you need a PC laptop. I bought an 11" Lenovo laptop for $119 from Best Buys that will run the Durametric program. If you plan on keeping the Porsche as I assume you do, then I would consider purchasing the Durametric program. The point is if you go with a cheapie OBD reader you need to be sure what it will and will not do... Are there any considerations as to running the car without functioning CATS?
  17. 1 point
    First off - thanks to everyone who has been down this road before me for providing tips and suggestions and troubleshooting regarding this common problem. I have been dealing with a key that would stay all the way to the right upon starting meaning that the A/C, heated seats and some other items would not function. My solution had been to simply start the car and then just move the key back one notch to the left and everything worked fine. So if others have that issue, my original solution will work but obviously the problem remains and at some point you may end up stranded if the ignition switch completely fails. I stumbled upon some of the other threads and found that this needed fixing and I opted to replace just the switch as opposed to upgrading to the new complete unit that Porsche has moved to. This procedure is not new to the board, but I thought a step by step with pictures may be useful to those looking for an inexpensive solution. It cost me $12.11 including tax. If your ignition mechanism has been changed to the newer revised unit the ignition switch is a different part number but I assume the steps would be the same. The part for just the switch - no longer available through Porsche since they are only selling the entire $150 unit - is 4A0905849B. The switch alone is available mail order through Pelican for $10, Autohausaz.com was +/- $8.75, Ebay has them all over the map from $15-30. All of these options will work but require shipping charges and delivery time. I was hoping for a local option since I had the time to do it today. Here is what I found in Houston - a local Audi dealer had one in stock for $35, while VW had to order it (for more than $35 believe it or not). Doing a search online at parts stores using my Porsche got me nowhere so I opted to use an older Audi - in my case a 1997 Audi A8 since the part is the same. I found Autozone had one for >$40, OReilly came up blank but I did not call to check, a specialty imports place had one for $27 and then I found it in stock at NAPA for $11.19 + tax. Since NAPA seems to have stores all over the place I suggest looking there first if you don't feel like mail order. The complete part number at NAPA was ATM 4A0905849B using the 1997 Audi A8 as the vehicle. Here is a picture of the NAPA part (left) alongside the original part which I removed from my 996 cab - note the AUDI rings on the old part. Equipment needed: Small flat screwdriver - eyeglass or electronics size Philips screwdriver Torx driver 10mm wrench rubber pry tool Cold beer to celebrate 1) Disconnect the battery - I just undid the negative with a 10mm wrench 2) OPTIONAL but makes the job easier than the shop manual in my opinion. Remove the side air vent by pulling the headlight switch towards you and inserting a small blade screwdriver up from the six o'clock position. You should notice a spring like resistance which will release the knob and allow it to pull towards you. Here is a picture of the back of the knob showing the release mechanism Once the knob is off remove the three torx screws – one in the headlight control recess and two on the side After the screws are out take a rubber pry tool (or be careful with a flat screwdriver) and remove the vent housing - it will pull towards you with a little effort but not much. Once off I pulled it out far enough to gain access but left the headlight control connected because I was lazy and saw no need to unhook it. I forgot to take a picture of this part but it should be self explanatory. You will now see a philips screw directly in the back of the air vent - remove. 3) Crawl under the dash and remove the center piece (A) of the air vent - there is not much room and you will not miss it. The piece can be nudged towards the side to release on one end and then the other. Since you removed the screw from above you should be able to remove the middle and side piece now out the bottom. 4) Unplug switch by pulling directly off the back - do not unhook the purple tabs just pull the entire unit back. Make sure to pull this off BEFORE unscrewing and removing the switch as the screws holding the switch in make this much easier than trying to get a hand in there - believe me I jumped ahead and then resorted to screwing it back in. 5) Unscrew two set screws - one on the bottom on one on the opposite side. The screws are coated with red paint that may need to be chipped through with your screwdriver before you can get the screw to grab. I unscrewed the bottom screw while under the dash and then from the seat I reached under and could view the top screw through the side vent area and unscrewed it. Do not remove the screws just undo them far enough to remove the ignition switch. Bottom screw noted in this picture Top screw as viewed from side vent opening - this can also be done from underneath but the small space and clutch pedal against my head led me to look for easier access 6) Now that the screws are loose you should be able to pull the ignition switch out and replace it with the new one. Screw in the set screws, hook the harness back to it and get ready for a cold beer - not quite but almost 7) Slide out from under the foot well, hook up the battery and see if all is well. You may as well check before reattaching the rest. If the car starts as it should you will notice a nice smooth ignition with the slight spring back to the left just after ignition. Hook up the air vents, screw everything back together and push the headlight knob back in place 8) Crack open a cold beer and smile - you just saved a lot of money. This is one of the simplest "repair" DIY out there - it took me probably less than 20 minutes including removing the side vent and I took my time since I had never done it before. If I need to replace it again - which is likely - it will be even quicker. You can always replace the entire ignition module with the new and improved unit at around $150 I think - and alot more effort - but for $12 and 20 minutes I am hoping I can get some decent life out of this switch and then just replace it again in a few years if I need to. Like I said before - this is not a new DIY but I am hopeful that these pictures will be helpful. Thanks again to all of those who provided the prior posts.
  18. 1 point
    Activating the ABS/PSM pump and control system while bleeding is only required if air has gotten into the control network. During a normal maintenance flush, it is not required.
  19. 1 point
    Symptom: CEL light comes on and when investigated, P0492 code (or similar) is detected. The following code description is observed in Durametric SW: Secondary Air Injection System Bank 2 - Value below lower limit value, test conditions are not-completed, fault is currently active and causing a DTC lightWhat is wrong:From my experience and from others' posts, this is usually caused by the failure of the secondary air pump that is located inside engine compartment (the two horn like structures on either side of the bay, near the firewall).The failure is apparently caused by the valve getting dirty and failing to open, which causes filter foam (you will see once you open this sucker out), to back up into the pump itself, causing fan blades to break off and plug up the hose even more.Once the fan blades are broken, the pump will need replacement.NOTE: If you choose to only replace the pump, please understand the cause of failure, since it may be likely you will have another failure. I did not think this would be the case until I removed the valve with hose and cleaned out a bunch of debris from there....so if you are servicing pump, you will do yourself a lot of good by cleaning the valve/hose at same time.Anyways, DIY is using pics, each successively numbered with instructions.Hope this helps someone make the repair.Plan on about 2-3 hours of work for this repair (1 pump), at nice leisurely pace. The other pump repair will be very similar, except pump part number will be different and location of mounts/screws will be on passenger side.Have fun. *** EDIT*** - I was gone for a while and all my pics had been removed from my tutorials. Regardless how it happened, here they are.
  20. 1 point
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