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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/25/2020 in Posts

  1. Some after photos... Definitely took more time cleaning than building this motor....
    3 points
  2. The headlights look fine to me.... people obsessing over headlights and BS like that are what makes the 996TT still one of the best cars out there, pound-for-pound, dollar-for-dollar
    3 points
  3. You can get a set of small "ez out" hex bits, one of which should fit tightly into the bolt head while rotating counter clockwise, which will loosen the stripped fastener. Amazon and others sell them (Amazon screw/bolt extractor set)
    3 points
  4. The factory default for the valves is the loud position, so if they are not hooked up, that is what you get. The valves only move to the "quiet" position when activated. The original reason for the valves was the incredibly restrictive Swiss noise laws for residential neighborhoods, so when the vehicle was operating a low speeds, it was quiet.
    2 points
  5. If you are even considering that, that's because you don't really like the car and should sell it. To me. For cheap.
    2 points
  6. Sometimes when there is a voltage spike to the system (like connecting a new battery) the programming can get "mixed up". When this happens the best thing to do is have a tech/shop with a PIWIS re-program the affected control module(s). I think it very rare to replace a DME if most everything but one or two items are not working.
    2 points
  7. As someone that spent a significant part of his career in the battery business, your use of "assuming the proportions are the same" is more than seriously flawed. The CCA test used by the BCI (Battery Council International, the international technical consortium that sets standards for battery ratings and testing procedures used by battery manufacturers world wide) is very similar to the one used by the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers); which requires storing the finished and fully charged battery a 0F (-17.8 C) for a period of 24 hours, then load testing it to determine its CCA rating. There is no known "proportioning" formula for determining this value, only hard testing data. Lightweight battery manufacturers have been "inventing" unique rating values and "equivalencies" without a basis in technical facts, and that are really totally meaningless, simply because they know what the outcome of publishing the more widely accepted testing data would be: Their batteries would appear weak compared to conventional SLI (starting, lighting, ignition) batteries.
    2 points
  8. All of the larger cables are susceptible to this problem. The longer the cable, like to the starter, the worse the problem because their length exacerbates the resistance issue, leading to larger voltage drops. The only real trick to checking each one with either a multimeter or Power Probe unit (Power Probes actually have a specific setting for checking voltage drops, plus the Power Probe's long leads back to the battery make the testing process easier).
    2 points
  9. Porsche "Book Time" to replace both front wheel bearings is 4.7 hours times your shops hourly rate. Porsche "Book Times" are usually a high estimate - an experienced tech can usually do the job in much less. So let the shop quote time - as long as it is under the "Book Time" you are likely good.
    2 points
  10. Looks like the part that goes inside the oil filter canister - to hold the filter in place. Just clean it and then push it back in.
    2 points
  11. Updated parts list (your's is 15 years old). 997.1 rear strut.pdf
    2 points
  12. First of all, LN Engineering's IMS Solution is a LOT more than just an oil feed line; the bearing insert is a solid bearing (no moving parts) with annular oil passages just like the almighty Mezger turbo engines used, the IMS shaft is plugged to prevent oil accumulation and the balance problems associated by running the shaft full of oil, the replacement rear IMS flange is coated with a Diamond like coating for strength and longevity, and the oil feed is sourced at the oil filter to get clean, cool oil rather than where some others have sourced it. Perhaps one of the biggest advantages of the Solution is that it never has to be replaced like other IMS retrofits, it is the ONLY permanent fix for IMS related headaches. We have never has any problems with the LN IMS Solution; it simply works, period
    2 points
  13. I would first check the one you have to make sure it is not blocked from air flow by debris.
    2 points
  14. Welcome to RennTech , and your English is fine, and much better than our Greek! It probably caused by oil pressure bleeding down from the hydraulic tensioner's in the VarioCam system, which do not cost that much, either in Euros or $.
    2 points
  15. Be aware the most dealer will not share the service records for the vehicle because they legally belong to the previous owner(s), and the dealers are uninclined to track them down and get a legal release.
    2 points
  16. I agree with millerchris85. After all the work and money poured into my CTT it’s eh now and I’d have been better served tuning up my 996TT. If you really must have a sporty drive in a Cayenne then I suggest looking after a 958 GTS, Turbo or Turbo S and having someone tuned them to your liking. Be forewarned though you will wear through ancillaries (brakes, axles, tensioners, etc...) much faster depending on how much and how hard you drive
    2 points
  17. A cooler on the return line from the rack to the pump will probably help.
    2 points
  18. Charge pressure sender Manifold pressure sender
    2 points
  19. Your stated voltage measurment is weak. You should be testing the primary cables, the large ones running from the battery to the ground and starter, these are the ones that tend to develop internal corrosion. If you are unfamiliar with this test, do a search as this has been covered several times previously. We always load test both the alternator and battery when there is a problem. While this requires a load tester, it verifies that both are capable of delivering both the correct voltage and current (amps) as required.
    2 points
  20. As I have said before "if ain't broke...". As well, you might want to check the price and labor of replacing just the troublesome one.
    1 point
  21. Likely the valve lift solenoid if you have checked the wiring.
    1 point
  22. If you have a qualified repair shop there is no reason not to buy the Bell Housing. Porsche, like many other manufacturers, sell only complete units.
    1 point
  23. Yes you should, have the car checked at an official Porsche Center, on the basis of their multi-points check list, before purchase.
    1 point
  24. Adding to this with a couple others I found. Thanks again finally got the job done. 👍
    1 point
  25. What you are overlooking is the simple fact that most PSE post delivery installations never hooked anything up as the default position for the valves is "loud", which is what people wanted the PSE for in the first place. So who's valves are on the exhaust system is pretty much irrelevant. We have probably installed a couple dozen PSE's over the years and I can only remember one that the owner wanted fully hooked up; and later even he eventually said activation of the valves was a waste of money.
    1 point
  26. Regulation of Fuel Quantity As a result of the on-demand regulation of fuel flow capacity, fuel heating in the tank is reduced. This is achieved by the DME control module switching on fuel pump 2 only as required, while fuel pump 1 is always activated. With the following switching criteria, fuel pump 2 is additionally switched on to increase flow capacity. At engine start and then 2 seconds run-on (with a hot start 5 seconds run-on). With a calculated fuel consumption of > 50 liters/hour the pump is switched on, and at < 45 liters/hour switched off again. With a fill level of < 10 liters in the tank, it is switched on and with > 15 liters it is switched off again. Fuel Pressure Regulator The pressure regulator is also built into the fuel tank below the right-side tank flange. Fuel pressure, which is present right up to the fuel injectors, is about 4.0 bar from idle to wide-open throttle. The quantity injected is thus dependent on intake manifold pressure, which is measured by the DME control module when calculating injection duration.
    1 point
  27. We always did it on a lift with an engine support bar under it before we undid the mounts. You only need to drop it a couple of inches to make getting at it much easier, not out of the car. Usually, the nut on the ground is not in bad shape, and a quick spray with a good penetrating oil always helps. Just be sure to wipe it off before putting it back together again, and put a small dab of anti seize inside the nut.
    1 point
  28. On thing you are not considering is that the control module itself may be involved. If that is the case, you are going to need a sharp tech and access to the PIWIS system.
    1 point
  29. Just received a breakout box with some leads to complete my set of 996 vintage tool 😉 I've been using a PST2 since 2008 with a lot of success. Especially for friends that are looking to buy a use 996 turbo or simple troubleshooting and keys reprogramming.... But I never used a breakout box before and it is difficult to found information about how to use this tool especially on Porsche. Would like to test the internal voltmeter/ohmeter (URI) of the Bosch KTS500....OBDII pinout, 16 ports on the breakout box ? 6 leads, + ground (black) red and blue wires etc....Is there, somewhere, printed info that I can get? Pins assignment would be nice!!! Thanks for your help, J.P.
    1 point
  30. I would use circuit board cleaner on the board but be careful as old rubberized buttons can tear with rough cleaning.
    1 point
  31. I designed a cup holder for use in a 996/986 with the ashtray delete mod. The files are available on Thingiverse (free). I also have files for the little plastic disks that cover the rear attachment points for the hardtop on a cabriolet, and seem to vanish every now and then. The cup holder is in two parts. The bottom screws into the existing holes in the ashtray delete, using the existing screws. The top part narrows the opening a bit so that a can or bottle won't move around. It's easily reversible - just remove the two screws, pull out the cup holder, replace the screws. Designs - About BillRVC - Thingiverse WWW.THINGIVERSE.COM
    1 point
  32. Actually it really does follow. If your CTT is 10 years old it would be a good idea to clean the throttle body and the MAFS. The MAF sensors do effect fuel metering in your CTT. Cheers!
    1 point
  33. Is there any change in the symptoms if you turn the PSM off?
    1 point
  34. P2187 Oxygen Sensing Adaptation, Idle Range, Bank 1 (RKAT1) - Above Limit P2189 Oxygen Sensing Adaptation, Idle Range, Bank 2 (RKAT2) - Above Limit Possible fault cause - Incorrect main charge signal - Intake air system leaking - Fuel pressure too low - Volume supply of fuel pump too low - Mechanical fault in injection valves - PCV valve leaking - Cap of oil filler neck leaking - Leaks in exhaust system - EVAP canister purge valve mechanically faulty (hangs open) - EVAP canister purge valve output stage faults Start with the easy ones - the oil filler cap and the PVC.
    1 point
  35. Ok, got the top working again tonight. The allen screw on the left is the one that pressurizes the pistons for the top. Make sure it's righty tighty all the way or the top isn't going to move. The allen screw in the black cone on the right has to do with the rear deck cover. Apparently, it can't be screwed too tight or that thing won't move, which was my problem. I'd unscrewed it thinking it was the one to manually release the top when my control unit died, but then realized it was the wrong screw and screwed it back in too tight. Tonight I loosened it up and suddenly the deck lid came back to life. Once the deck lid came back to life, the PST-2 calibrated everything no problem, and I'm back in business. So life is a lot better tonight since all in all, I correctly diagnosed the bad control unit, replaced it for $150, and then (eventually) got the top working again. However, I could kick myself for not paying more attention when I was screwing and unscrewing things in the first place since troubleshooting my own mistakes are what's taken me a month to figure out. Thankfully, I didn't break anything else except that wiring attachment in the hardtop mounting hole, but I'll start a new thread for that. I'm not tackling it tonight.
    1 point
  36. Here's a pictures of the tool I used to hold cams in place. Approx 4.5" center to center. But I cut a slot in the steel and slid them in until they fit the cams and then welded in place. All done from inside car through engine access hole.
    1 point
  37. First of all, I want to commend Loren for the GREAT DIY instructions here. I have never done a DIY project, and this was my first. I printed out the text and the pictures and had them on a table next to me...and went right down the line. Having no experience in this sort of thing, the one thing you lack is CONFIDENCE...the fear of messing something up. No sweat, you can get thru this. What I did that isn't covered here is order another sensor that comes out of the bottom of the coolant tank. You can break this by catching it on hoses and wiring...so an extra is a nice insurance policy to have. Otherwise your car is out of commission till you get one in about 4 days. I also disconnected the wiring harness from the sensor rather than try to take it out with the wires attached to it. Someone in another forum also suggested getting two of those heavy aluminum turkey roasting pans to drain the antifreeze into. They're flat and easily slide under the car...when one starts getting full, just slide it out of the way and stick the second one in there. It also makes it easy to pour the antifreeze back into the car because you can bend the aluminum pan and make a pointed pour spout. Remember...it's really a matter of a little confidence and patience. Oh yes....I also used my extensive crude english vocabulary during the process. Make sure you check and see if the neighbor lady is outside first.
    1 point
  38. 2002 C2 Cab Just got done replacing my coolant tank. I found that I needed to lower the engine about 3 " in order to fit the larger coolant tank into the cavity. Once I lowered the engine it poped right in and everything was connected and tight within 20 minutes.
    1 point
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