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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/23/2020 in Posts

  1. Some after photos... Definitely took more time cleaning than building this motor....
    3 points
  2. The headlights look fine to me.... people obsessing over headlights and BS like that are what makes the 996TT still one of the best cars out there, pound-for-pound, dollar-for-dollar
    3 points
  3. You can get a set of small "ez out" hex bits, one of which should fit tightly into the bolt head while rotating counter clockwise, which will loosen the stripped fastener. Amazon and others sell them (Amazon screw/bolt extractor set)
    3 points
  4. I created a video on how to remove and disassemble the front door. This includes removing the bottom trim strip, door lock, door handle, inner door panel, window/frame and door shell.
    2 points
  5. The factory default for the valves is the loud position, so if they are not hooked up, that is what you get. The valves only move to the "quiet" position when activated. The original reason for the valves was the incredibly restrictive Swiss noise laws for residential neighborhoods, so when the vehicle was operating a low speeds, it was quiet.
    2 points
  6. If you are even considering that, that's because you don't really like the car and should sell it. To me. For cheap.
    2 points
  7. Sometimes when there is a voltage spike to the system (like connecting a new battery) the programming can get "mixed up". When this happens the best thing to do is have a tech/shop with a PIWIS re-program the affected control module(s). I think it very rare to replace a DME if most everything but one or two items are not working.
    2 points
  8. As someone that spent a significant part of his career in the battery business, your use of "assuming the proportions are the same" is more than seriously flawed. The CCA test used by the BCI (Battery Council International, the international technical consortium that sets standards for battery ratings and testing procedures used by battery manufacturers world wide) is very similar to the one used by the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers); which requires storing the finished and fully charged battery a 0F (-17.8 C) for a period of 24 hours, then load testing it to determine its CCA rating. There is no known "proportioning" formula for determining this value, only hard testing data. Lightweight battery manufacturers have been "inventing" unique rating values and "equivalencies" without a basis in technical facts, and that are really totally meaningless, simply because they know what the outcome of publishing the more widely accepted testing data would be: Their batteries would appear weak compared to conventional SLI (starting, lighting, ignition) batteries.
    2 points
  9. Welcome to RennTech That is the factory outside air temperature sensor, which provides ambient temperature data to the DME to help the system adjust engine settings to temperature changes.
    1 point
  10. If you are ever over this way I can hook up my PST2 and the settings.
    1 point
  11. The antenna amplifier is located behind the right A-pillar trim. The single white wire in the left A-pillar is the remote control antenna and is connected on the other end of the wire, this antenna wire must also have a specific lenght in relation to the transmission frequency. Hope it helps.
    1 point
  12. Part of that rise in price is driven by concern over the widening move to EV's.
    1 point
  13. Welcome to RennTech Anyone that has spent any time running back to back dyno test of various hardware on a single vehicle would tell you the +/-3 HP run to run should be considered experimental error more than proof of anything, as well as rarely reproducible; and that dyno results on totally different brands of vehicles are not comparable. But it is your car and your money, and if you are happy with your choice of air filters, enjoy.
    1 point
  14. Likely the valve lift solenoid if you have checked the wiring.
    1 point
  15. Yes you should, have the car checked at an official Porsche Center, on the basis of their multi-points check list, before purchase.
    1 point
  16. Adding to this with a couple others I found. Thanks again finally got the job done. 👍
    1 point
  17. I recall loosening the bolts to be able to lift the seat to get to that screw drive and lube it. Then just crawled in from the rear floor to do as taking out the bolts was such a pita. But if the seat doesn’t go forward and back I think your done. I recall the seat motors under there. But if the seat doesn’t move at all it’s likely a trip to the stealership. Problem is how to drive the car. Could you possibly, just to drive to the shop, fasten a “booster” seat using the seatbelts. Right, like a baby booster seat. Temporary only of course.
    1 point
  18. First of all, the 2000 - 2002 cars are well known for requiring long drive cycles before resetting the I/M Readiness monitors, having to drive 200 or more miles is common. Second, disconnecting the battery will take you back to zero; the monitors in question will have to start all over again if you do that.
    1 point
  19. Small rodent trapped in the HVAC? If PASM equipped air compressor on the way out?
    1 point
  20. What you are overlooking is the simple fact that most PSE post delivery installations never hooked anything up as the default position for the valves is "loud", which is what people wanted the PSE for in the first place. So who's valves are on the exhaust system is pretty much irrelevant. We have probably installed a couple dozen PSE's over the years and I can only remember one that the owner wanted fully hooked up; and later even he eventually said activation of the valves was a waste of money.
    1 point
  21. This is the valve that control the waste gate and it is sometimes called the N75. The parts catalog call it the cycle valve and the part# is 996 605 155 00
    1 point
  22. There is so much wrong with this approach I don't know where to begin. Agreed, a trip to the dealer MAY sort this out, but I would hold onto your wallet. The key, immobilzer and DME/ECU must all be programmed with the same codes only Porsche Stuttgart can provide, to a licensed Porsche dealer with PIWIs. What you have done is replace parts with other parts and expect them to work. It doesn't work like that. Key provides both the mechanical laser cut key blade that works the electro-mechanical parts of the door locks and key switch, BUT, also includes an passive RFID pill that must match the key code programmed into the immobilzer. The key RFID pill is read when the key is inserted into the ignition switch by the ignition switch surround. The pill must match the immobilzer key codes. If it is correct, the immobilzer communicates a go (or no go) to the DME/ECU. All must be programmed the same. The codes in each must all match or the car will not start. You are looking at least at several hundreds of dollars at a Porsche dealer for programming. If the keys, immobilzer and DME/ECU need to be replaced, several thousands of dollars...at a Porsche dealer. And bonus, the immobilzer can only be reprogrammed a limited number of times, then it must be replaced. Walk very carefully on this one. Remember, this is a security feature of our cars so they cannot be stolen, and only the Porsche factory in Stuttgart will provide the codes to a licensed Porsche dealer. Good luck.
    1 point
  23. I have installed one in my 03 turbo. 1. Make sure that you replace the following before installing: 996-552-231-12-01C Support frame for center dashboard trim in Satin Black for Porsche 986 and 996 99655265304 Retaining Bar Climate control trim 996-552-339-00-01C 1. Took me awhile to figure out how to install the PCCM retaining brackets so they are secured to the horseshoe. 2. When you re-locate your HVAC control make sure you run the harness on the right side of the dash. There is only one place where the cables will be long enough to connect to the control module. 3. The USB media box harness needs to run to the center of the dash. The harness length is way too short. It took me 15 minutes to connect the small 10 pin connector to the rear of the PCCM, connecting it by feel. 4. You will need a PST2 or PIWIS to code your ecu, if you want map data to display in the instrument display. I used my PIWIS 2 to code the navigation in the instrument control module. 5. I haven’t read any of the manuals yet, but operation is pretty straightforward. 6. I have a Bose system and the sound is amazing, as compared to the CDR23. 7. I would recommend installing a SiriusXM tuner kit. 8. If you have a MOST system, it’s basically plug and play. If not, the PCCM is problematic with grounding and sound issues.
    1 point
  24. First off, cool post. Holy cow though, 600 Euros? I didn't realize the Bosch AGM was that much too, that's super expensive. I also just replaced my battery recently -- the original Varta AGM in my 2014 vehicle -- with an Optima Yellow-Top, which costs $250 USD and I was thinking that was pricey. You can get a DieHard Platinum AGM (apparently all the AGM's here are Johnson Controls anyway) here for about $175. The AGM batteries do last longer than conventional lead acid (with other cool benefits like no spill, vibration resistance, etc) and my 7 year old Varta probably could have made it longer, I've seen people with 10 years or more on them, but like you I also value not getting stranded. I got stranded many years ago in a blizzard in the middle of nowhere as the battery in my first BMW after college died as I was going up a hill. When I think about that experience I'm also happy to pay up a little for a battery as insurance (especially with my wife and kids in the car). To that end I've been really happy with the Yellow Top. My car starts very strong even as it has started to get colder here some days...and it's never a problem when my kids are in the car with the ignition off playing with the sunroof and all the other electronics. So far I would definitely buy an Optima again. Keep this thread updated later. Thanks for a fun post, this was a nice read.
    1 point
  25. We always did it on a lift with an engine support bar under it before we undid the mounts. You only need to drop it a couple of inches to make getting at it much easier, not out of the car. Usually, the nut on the ground is not in bad shape, and a quick spray with a good penetrating oil always helps. Just be sure to wipe it off before putting it back together again, and put a small dab of anti seize inside the nut.
    1 point
  26. If you have done 90k km or multiples of the the cardon shaft bearing need replacing before it costs you a whole shaft. Easy to check, get a small wreaking bar and move the shaft up and down, if you see cracks in the rubber around the bearing then replace it now!
    1 point
  27. Thud could be centre bearing carrier for the rear cardon shaft. Whistle may be evident if your aircon servo flaps are closed. Try opening them by turning on the fan and having air flowing to the outlets.
    1 point
  28. Just take the bulb out.
    1 point
  29. Listen to Loren. he is the expert. He was hinting that you might not need to replace the tensioner. It is a pretty intense job. You have to remove the air filter box, throttle body, loosen and remove the A/C compressor, The Power steering pump /fill reservoir and the Intake manifold cylindrical chambers that connect the 2 intake manifolds. You can remove the left intake manifold to give yourself more room, A lot of cables, air and coolant hoses are also in the way. Once you get to the tensioner and after you remove the pulley of the tensioner, you go around the back side to remove the arm and unbolt the old tensioner. To install the new one, is also a complex process that can end up messing up your mechanicals that are driven by the belt. The power steering pump alone is a nightmare to remove and its reservoir connects to a plastic hose that if you broke it, you will end up paying a fortune to replace. Pay a Porsche dealer not an Indy to do it. trust me. Taking a step back, why do you want to replace the tensioner? Use a Breaker bar to move the tensioner pulley easily. it makes it 90% easier to rotate clockwise. WITH THE BELT ON THE PULLEYS, If you can rotate the serpentine belt to 90 degrees from its normal position between the Alternator and the water pump then your tension is fine. Use Porsche belts. Spend your time AND MONEY on installing a 3rd radiator, it IS a better investment for your engine and your driving experience.
    1 point
  30. As I recall there is a cap on the inside of the car that gives you access to remove it.
    1 point
  31. FIXED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! it was the fan. So for future reference of anyone looking. Even if you measure voltage on the signal pins it doesnt mean the signal is incorrect. Also for reference. the VW touareg fan works.....it needs to be the non tow package fan(600w vs 800w). Bought mine for 150 bucks with a lifetime warranty! Feeling pretty good right now! For reference here are all the models the fan came in: UDI 7L0 959 455 E FORD 3M211 5150 BB FORD 1328625 PORSCHE 955 624 135 00 SEAT 7L0 959 455 E SEAT 7L0 959 455 B VW (VOLKSWAGEN) 7L0 959 455 B VW (VOLKSWAGEN) 7L0 959 455 E
    1 point
  32. Is there any change in the symptoms if you turn the PSM off?
    1 point
  33. Sunset Imports is NOT a Rennlist sponsor -- they ARE a RennTech.org sponsor ;)
    1 point
  34. 1. It depends on what is a lot of money to you. Part number 986.563.551.00+colour code - under $8.00 2. I'd advise you adjust the Hardtop, as no matter how hard the Germans or Finns tried, all cars will have flexed and 'settled' differently. If you have no leaks past the window seals when the soft top is up, use this as your datum and don't touch the windows at all. a) Take off the plastic covers from each side of the hardtop and loosen the five alen bolts each side so you can just move the spinlocks in both planes. b ) Open both doors and fully lower the windows, get your assistant to offer up the hardtop, clip in at the screen, make sure the spinlocks drop in, latch the top at the screen then make sure the top is sitting squarely on the car. c) Give each spinlock a 45° turn, then carefully using a 5mm drill as a spacer, have your assistant gently press down on the top to provide a 5mm gap between the metal of the top and the bodywork on both sides, tightening the alen bolts each side. The remaining 45° turn on the spinlocks will make the top 'snug'. d) Now have a look at the side window seals. On one side, gently pull the seal out of the aluminium channel - revealing the channel retaining screws. Loosen the screws enough to give some lateral movement of the channel. You will notice there is still a small strip of rubber on the outside of the channel - this forms the seal to the window. Now close the door and close the window, taking care that you and your assistant guide it into the slot with the small strip of rubber providing even pressure to the window. It doesn't require much, just even. e) Hold the channel in this position, reopen the window and tighten the screws, then start at one end of the rubber seal and push back into the alumium channel in small increments. Repeat for the other side window and your hardtop will be fitting and sealing perfectly.
    1 point
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