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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/23/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. (Special thanks to Chuck Jones for being the guinea pig and for taking the photos.) Parts you will need: 997.624.113.00 Actuator Tools you will need: Very short Torx T20 driver and right angle ratchet or tool to use the short T20 in a very confined space Regular screwdriver, phillips screw driver, and 10 mm wrench to remove th wheel well liner 1. Jack the car so that right front wheel is off the ground and secure it with a jack stand. Remove the right front wheel. 2. Remove the wheel well liner by removing the the plastics rivets (pry them out with a regular screwdriver). As well remove the 10 mm nuts on each side of the axle. Now remove the phillips screws that fasten the wheel well liner under the front bumper and remove the wheel well liner (and set aside). 3. Locate the EVAP canister and remove the electrical connection at the top of the canister. Now remove the 10 mm nut that holds the canister in place. Remove gas the vapor lines - one at the top and one at the bottom (again by squeezing the connectors). Remove the EVAP canister by pulling gently back and forth until it releases from the rubber gromments 4. Look back up under the fender (now that the canister is out of the way) and locate the broken actuator. Now using the stubby Torx T-20 loose (but do not remove) the two T-20 screws. The actuator itself is a bit tough to get to and you will need a really short T-20 Torx head to loosen the two screws. I say loosen because that is all you need to do to remove the part - it sits in two "U" shaped slots. Remove the electrical connector (by squeezing the tab). Here is a pic of the new part - as you see the Torx screws are already in place so that is all you have to do to replace it. 5. Put the new part in place making sure you feed the emergency pull line through the fender to its location in the door jam. There is room to slide it through the side so you don't need to try and thread it through the hole. Fasten the two Torx screws and reconnect the electrical connector. Chuck's car had the guide rose guide piece missing (so he needed to order one) Here is a pic of his car (without guide rose) and my car (with guide rose). Ref. P/N 997.624.505.00 We also noticed that on his car the plastic catch for the lock was missing (so he needed to order that too). Here is a pic of his car (without cap) and my car (with cap). Ref. P/N 996.201.243.00 6. Reinstall the EVAP canister by pushing it into place on the rubber gromments. Then reattach the vapor lines (they should snap back into place) and the electrical connection. Finally put the 10 mm nut back in place and tighten down. 7. Reinstall the wheel well liner (reverse of removal). 8. Mount the tire, lower the car and re-torque the wheel bolts. Done.
  2. 2 points
    The horn beeps and lights flashing is the alarm system telling you there is a alarm system zone fault somewhere. Could be an open (or maybe in this case closed/locked when it should be open) zone. Zones are: drivers/passenger doors, trunk lid, engine lid, glass (targa) top, gas cap lid, center console lid, and if you have it the glove box door. There are also two interior sensors in the overhead that detect motion when the car is locked. I think getting to the battery and disconnecting is a good idea. However, you have a problem since the trunk is not opening. First thing to try is actually seeing if the trunk is already open. Put your fingers under the trunk lid and try pulling up. Second is to locate the emergency release cable under the passenger side headlight. Unfortunately you need to pop the headlight out to make this a simple exercise, and you can't do that without opening the trunk. So you have to pull the passenger wheel well liner and fish out the cable from behind. Hopefully your wheel lock socket is not in your trunk!
  3. 2 points
    LONG STORY SHORT,,...My entry and drive system went bad one day., after almost a year of testing , replacing the battery, buying the test tool, almost brought a china piwis ,.... and bringing it to dealer and 800 dollars of dealer time., I had it fixed for 5 Dollars in parts. and one hr of soldering at first my kessy do not communicate to the darmatic tool or PIWIS at all, the dealer went ahead try to replace it , with a superseeded module, HOWEVER they wasn't able to program it for unknown reason, there is no module out there that will take my car's pin and complete the marry process because they said all the module has been superceeded. The dealer offer me to replace ALL the module in the car to an updated version for a cheapo $3000 dollars.! OF COURSE I refused,. ...,. I only lost my alarm horn , entry and drive function and its not worth $3000 dollars,. I was investigating myself trying to see what causing the problem, I came in to the touareg forum and found out those guys there have a lot of the problems with their module too. ... I was like ,hum.,,. then go under my dash and found the kessy module that is EXACTLY the same as theirs including the part number (WHICH IS A VW part number stamped on a sticker btw).... there is one guy there that took his module to a local electrician and found he has 2 fried mofset and 6 fried resistors.!!! I was like, fxxx it, why don't I give it a try, at first I couldn't found the 0.22ohm resistors (its was HARD trust me I took almost 2 months looking for them)., so I went ahead replaced the two mofset........... 15 mins and a lot of smoke later....... MAN,,,... the module can communicate with my Durametic tool...! HOWEVER,, all the antennas are reporting short to ground ERROR!!! I tried to clear it but the code come back instantly. then I went on to test the resistor value,... and found all six of the 0.22ohm resistors are SHORT (they are fusible resistor btw)....,,. sooooo I tried my best and finally able to locate those 0.22 ohm resistor .., fast forward 2 months later............ I received those resistors today.............. another 15 mins of smoke and sweat with my resoldering station... I plug the module back... run the scan tool clean the fault codes!!!!................... moment of truth,, I plug my dummy key in to the key cyclinder with the real key in my pocket!!!!!!!!!!!!! turn and the CAR STARTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I have successfully fixed a $3000 dollars repair (that don't guarantee will work) with 5 dollars worth of resistors !!!!!! NOTE: IF your kessy don't communicate with the scan tool,. Its the TWO MOFSET that is Fried. if you have all antennas short to ground or not responding its the 6 resistors!
  4. 2 points
    Updated Mileage: 288,565. 2018 Round trips included NY to Seattle and NY to New Orleans. Still not driving as much as I'd like. #4 cylinder down to 75%. Trying to hold out to 300k before rebuild.
  5. 2 points
  6. 2 points
    I think you need option 666 or 619 for Bluetooth phone. 619 can be retrofitted, which is less expensive than 666. By the way, you can't update the system to v2.24 in one step. You have to update to v2.23 first. Your dealer should know this. I would try to find one who knows what they are doing. The 619 Mobile phone preparation retrofit involves fitting an additional microphone and entering an activation code for the Bluetooth using a PIWIS tester.
  7. 2 points
    15-year-old car - absolutely yes. Best to change every 5 years.
  8. 2 points
    Just in case anyone comes across this thread trying to solve unstable idle issues, bigbuzuki was on the right track. I replaced the vapor canister purge valve, pretty easy and inexpensive, and the crankcase breather check valve, even easier. the purge valve may have been a contributor, but the check valve was the main culprit. What is interesting here is that all of my ventilation hoses were intact and without leaks, but if you peered inside the removed check valve, you could clearly see that the membranes inside had completely disintegrated. That immediately did the trick.
  9. 2 points
    It seems that there are more and more cases of these faults appearing, and as some of our cars are reaching 10-12 years old, it is hardly surprising. I've compiled this information from past personal experience on both of my 996s, reading about others on here and other forums, referring to the workshop manual and wiring diagrams, and applying some logic. Hopefully you might find it useful, and save some grief when troubleshooting. DOOR MICROSWITCHES There are seven microswitches in each door which control the alarm system. Two are separate switches: a] One on the outside door handle. This switch is used to sense that the handle is lifted. b] One on the inside door handle, which has the same function. When the car is unlocked and either handle is lifted, this signals the alarm control module (ACM) to lower the appropriate window by 10mm, and turn on the interior lights. As soon as the door opens, another switch inside the door lock (explained later) tells the ACM that the door is open, which holds the window down until the door is closed, when the window is raised, and the dimming timer on the interior lights is started. Once the car is locked, the outside handle switches are ignored by the ACM. The remaining five switches are inside the door lock assembly: c] One switch senses if the door is open or closed. d] One senses that the key has been turned to the 'lock' position. e] Another senses that the key has been turned to the 'unlock' position. f] One senses that the door lock motor has reached the 'lock' position. g] Another senses that the door lock motor has reached the 'unlock' position. TYPICAL FAULTS All these microswitches can be problematic, and it is common for one or more to fail at some time. These are some of the common failures and symptoms: 1) The door window won't drop when lifting a handle. This is usually the handle microswitch which has failed. 2) The window drops, but goes back up when the door opens, or when the handle is released. This can be the handle microswitch, or more likely the 'door open/closed microswitch' ( c ) has stuck. Because the system thinks the door is still closed, it sends the window back up. 3) Door window won't go up the last 10mm. This is likely to be the 'door open/closed microswitch' ( c ) stuck in the opposite sense to (2). The system thinks the door is still open, so won't allow the window to go back up. Note that in this case the door will still lock, but you may get a single-beep from the alarm horn. 4) Door will not lock with key. The 'key lock' microswitch (d) is broken. This is very rare, as this microswitch is hardly ever used – most times the car is locked by remote. 5) Door will not unlock with key. The 'key lock' microswitch (e) is broken. This is also very rare, for the same reason. 6) Door locks, and then immediately unlocks, usually accompanied by a double-beep from the alarm horn. This is the 'door locked' microswitch (f). The locking motor physically operates the door lock, but the microswitch to sense this has failed/stuck. The ACM promptly unlocks the car. In this case, the only way to lock the door is to use the emergency locking procedure. Turn the key in the door to the lock position and back three times in quick succession. 7) The door unlocks, but there is a beep or double-beep from the alarm horn. This is the 'door unlocked' microswitch (g). Although the door is unlocked, the ACM has not recognised that. The alarm will not sound, as turning the key in the lock has deactivated it. FIXES The inside and outside handle microswitches are available separately, and are not too expensive. Although alternative equivalent switches may be available, the genuine Porsche switch comes with a connector and wiring, so it makes sense to use an original. Part Numbers: Inside handle microswitch: 996.613.123.00 (Same both sides) Outside handle microswitch: 996.613.125.00 (Left) / 996.613.126.00 (Right) The door lock microswitches are not available separately. You have to buy the complete door lock assembly, at a cost of around $120. It has been known for people to repair the offending switch though. This is a picture of a typical failure of a 'door open/close' microswitch (courtesy of another RennTech member): You can see that the plastic plunger has broken, jamming the switch lever inside. These switches are (apparently) made by Burgess, but as yet the source and part number are unknown. There are several other similar standard switches on the market for around $2, and people have stripped down the new switch and rebuilt the old one with the plunger from the new one. OTHER SWITCHES IN THE ALARM SYSTEM The other switches and contacts in the alarm system are to monitor the lid closures: Front lid microswitch Rear lid microswitch Oddment compartment microswitch Glove box microswitch Radio contact (to detect radio theft) An open compartment or switch failure will cause a single-beep of the alarm horn on locking. A system error will cause a double-beep. Other elements of the system include an interior monitoring sensor (in the overhead lighting), an alarm readiness light (on the dashboard in the centre) and a central locking button (on the dashboard). Options are a tilt sensor (next to the battery or under the left-hand seat) and an alarm siren (next to the battery).
  10. 2 points
    I got sick of not having cupholders in my Boxster. So I set out to find some. The options seemed to be OEM cupholders, either the clip on type, or the single DIN type. And we all know the problems with those - not secure enough fit, not accommodating large cups, etc. Also, the DIN type takes up an entire vertical DIN slot, making fitting double DIN GPS impossible. Other solutions seem to be to use a cutout for cups in the centre console box - which means the lid needs to stay open; and "ultimate cupholder" - which doesn't look OEM at all. So I was searching for generic cupholders on Ebay, and found this: http://cgi.ebay.com....=item439b780b6e And from a seller, the dimensions are: 7 7/16" long by 1" just the cover lid, assembly is 7" x 4 3/4" The width is as close to OEM fit for the Boxster as it gets, for a non-Porsche part! So I bought it. Realising that late model VWs like Passat and Jetta has the same console width as our Boxster, I then bought this: http://cgi.ebay.com....=item3ca672b7af It's entirely possible that other units like this http://cgi.ebay.com....=item3356ef534c would also fit. And before you start, get a rotary tool (like a Dremel). It's an absolute god send! Made things so easy. Here is the unit: Compared to another double DIN unit I originally planned for the mod: The difference is the newer one has a hi res screen. I actually rather liked the volume knob on the low res one. I put the cupholder and GPS unit together, with double sided tape, like this: You can also mount the cupholder on top, like this: I chose to go with the bottom fit, because I don't really like cups placed that high, and the bottom fit actually takes up a few mm less in height, which gives a better fit in the horseshoe frame. Speaking of frame, it's cut up, like this: There was a lip on the inner aspect of the lower border, this was cut to make room to increase the height. This, together with some slight sanding of the bottom of the cupholder was all that's required to make the height of the combo fit just right. Incredibly lucky! Note, you must get rid of the lower lip much as you can. Or the cupholder would be clamped too tight between the frame and the GPS, and it doesn't open when clamped tight. In the above picture, you can see I turned the OEM metal bracket around. This was necessary as the cupholder doesn't extend as deep as the OEM stereo, so the bracket support needs to come forward. You need to drill a hole in the original bracket to allow this. The reason will be very apparent when you actually do this. Here is a close up of the reversed bracket: The GPS antenna is simply placed near the alarm cover. Remove the alarm cover first, thread the GPS wire through, then just fish for it through the horseshoe frame. No need to remove anything else to place the GPS antenna. The thick wire attached to the GPS wire is the loom for my Head-Up-Display (another mod, for another day) :) The rest of the wiring here, with the unit ready to be pushed in: Here is the test fit: You can see that I will need a "n" shaped bezel to fill out the gap. This was obtained by modifying the Passat bezel that came with the GPS. The width is an exact fit, just like the cupholder (maybe 1mm longer, but I just left it). So I just sanded down the top border of the frame. And cut off the bottom border. I don't have a picture with the bottom border removed, only with the thinned top border: Press it in, it's a snug fit, not even sticky taped. And voooowwlaahhh!!!! OEM look!! From afar: With cupholder open: With a large "cup": In summary, get a genuine Jetta cupholder and an aftermarket Passat double DIN GPS! (not affliated with the seller/s, I promise) :)
  11. 2 points
    If your battery is dead and you need to get into the front trunk, it may be necessary to locate the manual pull wire to open the front trunk and get to the battery. This might be more difficult to locate the first time. You may not be in a good location to wrestle the right front tire splash guard to find it. It might be night time or you may not be dressed in the correct clothes to be down by the tires trying to locate it. I would recommend that you take the time to locate it in good weather and in the comfort of your garage or better yet re-route the wire to the front bumper behind the plastic plug the hides the location for the tow fish eye bolt. To get started I removed the carpet liner in the front trunk. The front trunk liner is made up of 2 sections and I only had to remove the front section. There was one thumbscrew clip on the passenger side and one thumbscrew clip opposite on the driver's side. Also on the driver's side there was one snapin clip and 2 additional snapin clips located in the front of the trunk. All five clips are very easy to find and remove. I then removed the plastic trim directly on top of the front trunk latch and microswitch. There are 4 screw plugs and you simply turn the plastic plugs 1/4 to 1/2 of a turn: I then removed the passenger side head lamp by using the tool in the Boxster tool kit. The kit is usually located near the spare tire in the front trunk. Turn the wrentch about 1/2 turn counter clockwise to unlock the headlamp. Slide the head lamp out. You may have to jiggle it a little but it should slide out with very little effort. Once the light is out you will be able to locate the pull wire. It is clamped into a lasso at the end. In the photo below you can see it at the end of the red arrow. The red oval in the top of the photo is the plastic wheel splash guard. The passenger front tire is directly behind that. Some recommend to access the pull wire from the tire side but that is a little more difficult and you still have the problem of trying to re-rout the wire up to the front bumber. Doing it from the head lamp side makes it easy. Here is another photo with my finger pointing at the pull wire. Remove the front bumper plastic cover that hides the tow plug. I used a plastic upholstery tool and the plastic cap popped right out. The plug has a fishline wire connected to it to prevent you from losing it. Use the light from a flashlight to guide you (from the front bumber side) and re-route the pull wire from the headlight to the tow plug. Having the top plastic guard off makes this very easy. Tuck the pull wire back in and re-insert the pastic bumber plug. Reassembly is just the reverse. Slide the headlamp back into the guides and push it home, use the wrentch and turn clock wise. you will hear a loud pop when the headlamp is secured. You know have easy access to the emergency pull wire.
  12. 1 point
    Hi Toby, I used this as a general guide, it should be very similar to any valved exhaust you plan on installing. Hope it helps! I hope they don't mind installation links here - Akrapovic Install
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
    Joe is right and I stand corrected. #1 and #3 are shown in this pic.
  15. 1 point
    Then a proper programming is needed.
  16. 1 point
    The car has to be programmed to the Kessy fob (not the other way around). You must have the car's security codes and use a Porsche PIWIS tester. There is no other way that I am aware of. You need to find a shop with a Porsche PIWIS tester and then you as the legal car owner needs to go a Porsche dealer and request your security codes - you may be required to show proof of ownership.
  17. 1 point
    Please READ the Lost Radio Code FAQ and follow the procedure there to get your serial number - then post your request here.
  18. 1 point
    Perhaps this (from the service manual) will help...
  19. 1 point
    Pretty much has to be 661 - so that engine (factory) build was 2001.
  20. 1 point
    Knowing a bit about electronics in general, I would say that if there's a Aux Battery and it's got a problem then it's going to continue to be a problem while connected to the system. But I will defer to those gurus with the noggin voodoo (vast knowledge).
  21. 1 point
    First of all, try disconnecting the battery to see if it changes anything. If you jack up the car and have all 4 wheels off the pavement(safely), do the rear wheels move by hand in neutral? Check the driveshaft, rear diff while you have the wheels off the ground. Are the calipers stuck? Take off the calipers to see if the problem still there. Maybe parking brake cable not releasing at all. According to a parts diagram, parking brake shoes are inside the rear brake rotors. If the parking brake is ON, it's really hard to remove rear rotors. So if you already have the rear calipers off from the previous step, then try taking off the rear rotors and inspect the operation of parking brake. GL
  22. 1 point
    Hi to anyone who had this exact problem i have found a solution. after i changed my undamaged water pump and thermostat i got temp gauge dead and flashing. changed coolant sensor, to no avail. turns out that i needed to clear error codes with code reader and that instantly bought the gauge to life back to normal. 2.7 boxster 2001
  23. 1 point
    Have you eliminated these possibilities from the manual? I know all sorts of things got funky on mine when it had a weak battery. Page: 153 The Auto Start Stop function is available with limited functionality in the following situations, for example: – If the air conditioning or passenger compartment heating is operated at a high setting or if the defrost function is run for long time periods. – If the battery charging condition is low. – On upward or downward slopes. – During internal vehicle test procedures, e.g. automatic engine checks.
  24. 1 point
    Have you checked the main and aux car batteries for proper voltage? An under-volt battery can cause weird things to happen. On my car it triggered Limp Mode which only allowed the trans to shift up to third gear.
  25. 1 point
    I know, I have a different car from possibly a different era, but . . . Sometimes when the car won't respond to the buttons on the key - even after starting the car - it takes using the key in the door lock to make it better. This has only happened a couple times since owning the car for four years. I was fearful of needing to get the system reprogrammed, but nope, just needed to manually lock and unlock the car. go figure
  26. 1 point
    If you have a 996 Targa you'll know that the little rubber piece that covers the rear glass' latch tends to degrade and fall apart. I designed a replacement piece that you can 3D print. Just make sure that you use PETG or ABS plastic so it doesn't melt when your car is sitting out in the sun. I'll probably get some filler primer and some matte black paint to make it match the rest of the trim, but I think it turned out pretty well. I don't know how much a genuine replacement costs, but it was a fun little exercise for me. Download for FREE here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3287876 Enjoy!
  27. 1 point
    Very cool! I have great respect for people who not only can do this kind of thing, but are willing to share the results of their effort. Well done sir!
  28. 1 point
    Loren, your support for folks is nothing short of incredible. I purchased a car without the code provided, however, the radio is currently working. The model is a becker CDR-210 with serial number T5005134 With a working radio is the code available via some interrogation? Kurt
  29. 1 point
    I had just read they moved it to under the dash right when you posted, thank you. Found out from the inspector that the car doesn't run cause.....it doesn't have a battery. DUH
  30. 1 point
    Getting a couple of codes and they are confusing me along with the fuel trim readings. Getting: P0300, P0301, P0302, P0303 & P1340 (all pending codes). Looking at short term & long term fuel trim though it looks like bank 2 is an issue. These are from Torque Pro, waiting for Durametric to show up this week. at idle: STFT1: -1.56% STFT2: 25% LTFT1: 0 LTFT2: 0 MAF: 3.5 g/s I have replaced: all coils all plugs aos upper & lower AOS tubes oil filler tub at crank & middle accordion oil filler cap new battery all new o2 sensors First through was vacuum leak, but using carb cleaner all over the engine I can't find one anywhere. If I take off the oil filler cap the car stumbles like I would expect it to.
  31. 1 point
    If there is no large leak, the amount of oil you have put into the engine will be too little. Pour 1/4 can at a time until the max. on the dipstick is reached. Probably the tick in the engine come through too little oil in the engine (valve train), a completely empty engine after disassembly/reassembly will have to contain more oil.
  32. 1 point
  33. 1 point
    138,000 on my Artic Silver 1997. Still a blast to drive. Currently have hard top on it and snows since I'm in Michigan and it looks like an early winter!
  34. 1 point
    Before I bought my '04 this summer... I made 3 offers on others, all of which were overprice in my opinion, all 3 phoned me back within 48 hours reducing their offer... ran into other issue with each (hidden damage on 2nd inspection, etc... ) but hold tight you might be surprised. See if you can figure out what the most important thing to them is in the negotiation... getting rid of stale inventory, price, avoiding auction hassles and fees... and see if you can make that work to your advantage... you give they give... and hopefully what you give up is less important to you then it is to them. MK
  35. 1 point
    It's not selling because the value is between $15k and $20k. For reference, I purchased my 2006 Cayenne Turbo 3 years ago with 95,000 miles on it. It has all of these same option and has the panoramic sunroof and roof transport system as well as the coolant pipe upgrade for $11k. Mine is a 3 owner. If you do proceed, make sure that the coolant pipes have been upgraded from the plastic to the metal. The plastic will fail and strand you.
  36. 1 point
    Sorry to be bringing up an old thread but just looking for some clarification on this one and trying to understand the nomenclature. Seeing that the deviation of bank one is off by 12 degrees Crk , but the actual angle read at idle is 1.1 degrees. Would it be fair to say the engine is working "full on " to adapt this car to try and maintain the 1.1 at idle and 25.94 at 2K ? just helping a friend with P1397 problem so got me interested in the whole theory of operation. The car we are working on is a 99 996 so has DME 5.2.2 . we can see deviation but 5.2.2 does not show actual ( unless I just cant see it ) which is a bit disappointing. I wanted to see if it jumps to 25 when actuating variocam but without seeing actual we wont know. Thanks
  37. 1 point
    If your not driving through rivers or the like and you want a long term solution, remove the plug permanently.
  38. 1 point
    Have not been on this forum for a while since my 09 CTTS was super reliable. It has 250k km now and still drives like a dream. Loving it. I had the truck rear-ended by a Honda on the highway, the muffler and lower bumper were replaced. After taking it back from the Porsche body shop the truck was shaking badly at idle and the 1373, 0421,0431, 1352, 1377, 1378 codes showed up. Body shop claimed that it was not their responsibility. The truck had very rough idle and very noticeable ticking noise. I flushed the engine oil and nothing happened. After doing some research online, I replaced part #17 (Hydraulic Valve - Genuine Porsche G94810530803) on the driver side at my buddy's shop. It was held by 2 screws and was done from underneath the truck. Nothing else was removed other than the plastic panel under the car. Cleared the code and they never came back. Apparently, this valve is part of the VarioCam Plus that changes the opening heights of the lifters. Local Porsche dealer told me that these valves fail all the time. As a result, they have these parts in stock. Hope this would help fellow Cayenne owners.
  39. 1 point

    Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    Dust Pollen Filter.pdf
  40. 1 point
    Serpentine belt replacement eventually, air filters. Brake service (new fluid every 2 years). In Dubai I can keep extending the warranty which covers pretty much everything else (this year a coolant cap, some valves in the cooling system, and a cup holder repair under warranty). Oh and tires. Compared to my M car it’s got a lot let plastic bits so should bode well for longevity. Last point is forget about it as a DYI car. Taking the bumper off to get to the engine isn’t conducive to tinkering. Mine is a 2012 CS with 47000 miles. Added a duck tale and GTS front spoiler as a hommage to older 911 cars. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  41. 1 point
    I do have a complete set, which is the ECU, the kessy, the ignition lock, the steering lock still attached to the steering column and the key for a 2004 Cayenne S if someone is in need of getting going immediately. Email me at mrcbx@att.net if you need this, it will be cheaper than the dealer alternative, but please note this is for the V8 non-turbo only.
  42. 1 point
    I've had the same problem in my 2008 v6. After removing the 2 bolts I saw it had a rubber gasket. Waiting for the dealership to call me when it comes in. (Was the cheapest there) It's technically for the thermostat. It's called a flange socket and sealing ring. Here's the part #'s 95510623100 Flange Socket 95510643100 Sealing Ring Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  43. 1 point
    Eureka! I suppose during the time you guys were typing, I was arriving at the same conclusion. I pulled the latch mechanism out and examined it up-close. The tension spring was out of a pocket on the latch and not providing any push when the latch was released. Hence, the hood could be pulled up out of 'battery' but would not pop up on its own. I disassembled the mechanism, lubed it, and re-inserted the spring into the latch. Put it back together and now all is well. Very simple to do. This is how I did it and you may find it useful. Do so at your own risk, yada yada yada. 1st, open the hood and peel back the carpet cover just inside of the latch. Next, using a flat-head screwdriver, remove the four plastic 'screws' holding the trim plate between the bumper and the hood flange. They merely turn 90 degrees (so that they are perpendicular to the car's direction of travel) and pop out. Then remove the trim piece and place to the side. Next, using a ten millimeter socket, remove the two bolts securing the latch to the car. They are located just inside the trunk under the carpet you just peeled back. Once they are removed, the latch is now only held in place by two metal cables and the alarm pin switch wires. Carefully unplug the alarm wires. Push in on a small 'latch' on the lower half of the plug and pull out the lower half. Then carefully rotate the upper half about 45 degrees (it should be fairly easy to move, don't force it) and the plug will pop out of the metal holder. Then use a small screwdriver to gently push a release clip on the plastic mounting point. This will allow the small plastic mount to separate from the wiring plug. Now you need to gently remove the cables from their sockets. Take the tension off of the upper cable and gently pull the cable up out of its socket. Then remove the lower cable in the same way. The only thing holding the latch in the car now is the alarm wiring harness. Push the rubber grommet through the body toward the bumper. You can then pull the wiring through and the entire latch will come out of the car. Be sure to set the stainless steel shroud to the side. It was not attached on my car but may be on yours. Now that you have the latch out of the car, you can see the large diameter steel spring that is wound around the large post to the passenger side of the latch. That is the culprit. The small plastic shroud over it pulled straight out and off of my latch. This is the microswitch that tells the alarm that the trunk is open or closed. Set it to the side. You should now see the latch mechanism and the hole that the spring needs to be in to function properly. I used two screwdrivers to push the other end of the spring (the end on the release / catch mechanism ) over the catch. This allowed me to push the end into the latch more easily. I then popped the spring back over the catch. Now there should be tension on both the latch and the catch. Lubricate with white lithium grease, or some other semi-solid lubricant and work the mechanism to ensure that it is functioning properly. Once you have confirmed proper function, reassemble in reverse order (i.e. put the alarm switch back on - it should snap right back in place ), pop the cable back on, thread the wiring through and secure the grommet in place, place the stainless shroud on, insert the bolts and loosely tighten things. Once the bolts are in, line up the hood and the latch mechanism and tighten down the latch. Replace the plastic bumper/body trim piece but don't insert the 'screws' until you've tested the hood a couple times. Once it is clear that the hood is functioning properly, secure the trim, replace the carpet and smile at a job well done, for free. If I can figure out how to transfer my pictures out of my camera phone I'll add some illustration to this. Hope this helps. I was frustrated as *)*^*( until y'all help me realize what the problem was. Pictures ...
  44. 1 point
    JFP I don't disagree with anything you said and no doubt damage can be done by using the wrong fluids or lubricants in any mechanical device, but once one understand the properties of the fluid(s) in question and they match or exceed the OE specs and performance there is no shame in using something other than OE. I am not sure what Porsche's current recommendation is but for quite a while they spec'd Mobil 1 0W-40 for all air-cooled 911s and you don't have to search very hard to find a large number of experts that will tell you there are superior engine oils for these air-cooled engines. Brake fluid is another example - why not use something like Motul 600, Castrol SRF or Endless RF650 (Porsche Cup car spec!) rather than generic not-made-by-Porsche Porsche-lebeled DOT 4? These special fluids might be more hygroscopic than the OE fluid, requiring more frequent changes, but one shouldn't be chastised for using any of these fluids in a Porsche because they certainly aren't inferior. I will continue searching until I find the OE manufacturer of the ATF that Porsche sticks their label on, then I will compare the specs to the other available options to determine what to use in my 958TT. If I find a fluid that I like better than the Porsche dealer fluid and it costs more than the Porsche fluid I will gladly buy it. Since you know these rigs well can you please confirm if the transmission is made by Aisin or ZF? Regards
  45. 1 point
    Or you can download them here: http://rennkit.com/home/service-manual/
  46. 1 point
    Yes, the Tip controller can not switch the valve if it is off (fuse removed) - nor can the vacuum valve switch with the engine off.
  47. 1 point
    Cabriolet: Removable windbreak that reduces air turbulence for driver/passenger while also serving as a cover for back-seat luggage. Easy to attach, and can easily be stowed in a protective cover in the trunk; or Coupe: Front lip on your sunroof.
  48. 1 point
    Good Idea Frank! Thanks for these suggestions. Of course I will need Loren's help with the "move" towards the DIY section. J.P.
  49. 1 point
    Removing selector knob 1. Selector lever is in position D. Note! -- The button (inset) at the front must not be pressed down when the selector knob is pulled. 2. Pull selector knob up and off. Installing selector knob Note! -- The button must not be pressed down when the selector knob is installed. 1. Selector lever is in position D. Caution! Spring in selector knob is overstretched! - Only move the selector knob as far forward until the tool can be inserted. - Avoid any further overstretching. 2. The unlocking hook in the selector knob must retract to the button grey object . Lock the hook under the button, using short screwdriver A for example. 3. Push on the selector knob until it audibly engages in the selector support. The sleeve is then inserted in the selector lever cover. 4. Remove the tool on the handle. 5. Functional test of gear selecting system: - Will the vehicle start? - Do all the selector lever positions work?
  50. 1 point
    1.) Un-screw the one phillips head screw at top center of side air intake... 2.) The molded air duct and the intake grill are still attached by three delicate plastic tabs at the three points... The best way to remove this is gently insert your fingers through the grills into the intake at the points circled in red and gently try to free the tabs... All three points come forward towards you, but if one is stuck or gets caught it will break... 3.) Inside the drivers side air duct you will find a snorkle... The snorkle is added to most US cars for noise restrictions. Now this piece is attached by no screws or tabs, but it most likely will give you some troubles removing... The best way is to remove this, just grab a hold of the long snorkle (not the small dish on the end)... Now wiggle it from left to right and vice versa while pulling out towards you. This works, but might take a little effort. 4.) This is what the intake is going to look like after the snorkel is removed... Just carefully insert the three tabs back into their points... Make sure that all three are tightly in by pushing the airduct cover (not the grill)... Insert your 1 screw into top center of cover and you are done.
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