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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/25/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. (Special thanks to Chuck Jones for being the guinea pig and for taking the photos.) Parts you will need: 997.624.113.00 Actuator Tools you will need: Very short Torx T20 driver and right angle ratchet or tool to use the short T20 in a very confined space Regular screwdriver, phillips screw driver, and 10 mm wrench to remove th wheel well liner 1. Jack the car so that right front wheel is off the ground and secure it with a jack stand. Remove the right front wheel. 2. Remove the wheel well liner by removing the the plastics rivets (pry them out with a regular screwdriver). As well remove the 10 mm nuts on each side of the axle. Now remove the phillips screws that fasten the wheel well liner under the front bumper and remove the wheel well liner (and set aside). 3. Locate the EVAP canister and remove the electrical connection at the top of the canister. Now remove the 10 mm nut that holds the canister in place. Remove gas the vapor lines - one at the top and one at the bottom (again by squeezing the connectors). Remove the EVAP canister by pulling gently back and forth until it releases from the rubber gromments 4. Look back up under the fender (now that the canister is out of the way) and locate the broken actuator. Now using the stubby Torx T-20 loose (but do not remove) the two T-20 screws. The actuator itself is a bit tough to get to and you will need a really short T-20 Torx head to loosen the two screws. I say loosen because that is all you need to do to remove the part - it sits in two "U" shaped slots. Remove the electrical connector (by squeezing the tab). Here is a pic of the new part - as you see the Torx screws are already in place so that is all you have to do to replace it. 5. Put the new part in place making sure you feed the emergency pull line through the fender to its location in the door jam. There is room to slide it through the side so you don't need to try and thread it through the hole. Fasten the two Torx screws and reconnect the electrical connector. Chuck's car had the guide rose guide piece missing (so he needed to order one) Here is a pic of his car (without guide rose) and my car (with guide rose). Ref. P/N 997.624.505.00 We also noticed that on his car the plastic catch for the lock was missing (so he needed to order that too). Here is a pic of his car (without cap) and my car (with cap). Ref. P/N 996.201.243.00 6. Reinstall the EVAP canister by pushing it into place on the rubber gromments. Then reattach the vapor lines (they should snap back into place) and the electrical connection. Finally put the 10 mm nut back in place and tighten down. 7. Reinstall the wheel well liner (reverse of removal). 8. Mount the tire, lower the car and re-torque the wheel bolts. Done.
  2. 2 points
    The horn beeps and lights flashing is the alarm system telling you there is a alarm system zone fault somewhere. Could be an open (or maybe in this case closed/locked when it should be open) zone. Zones are: drivers/passenger doors, trunk lid, engine lid, glass (targa) top, gas cap lid, center console lid, and if you have it the glove box door. There are also two interior sensors in the overhead that detect motion when the car is locked. I think getting to the battery and disconnecting is a good idea. However, you have a problem since the trunk is not opening. First thing to try is actually seeing if the trunk is already open. Put your fingers under the trunk lid and try pulling up. Second is to locate the emergency release cable under the passenger side headlight. Unfortunately you need to pop the headlight out to make this a simple exercise, and you can't do that without opening the trunk. So you have to pull the passenger wheel well liner and fish out the cable from behind. Hopefully your wheel lock socket is not in your trunk!
  3. 2 points
    LONG STORY SHORT,,...My entry and drive system went bad one day., after almost a year of testing , replacing the battery, buying the test tool, almost brought a china piwis ,.... and bringing it to dealer and 800 dollars of dealer time., I had it fixed for 5 Dollars in parts. and one hr of soldering at first my kessy do not communicate to the darmatic tool or PIWIS at all, the dealer went ahead try to replace it , with a superseeded module, HOWEVER they wasn't able to program it for unknown reason, there is no module out there that will take my car's pin and complete the marry process because they said all the module has been superceeded. The dealer offer me to replace ALL the module in the car to an updated version for a cheapo $3000 dollars.! OF COURSE I refused,. ...,. I only lost my alarm horn , entry and drive function and its not worth $3000 dollars,. I was investigating myself trying to see what causing the problem, I came in to the touareg forum and found out those guys there have a lot of the problems with their module too. ... I was like ,hum.,,. then go under my dash and found the kessy module that is EXACTLY the same as theirs including the part number (WHICH IS A VW part number stamped on a sticker btw).... there is one guy there that took his module to a local electrician and found he has 2 fried mofset and 6 fried resistors.!!! I was like, fxxx it, why don't I give it a try, at first I couldn't found the 0.22ohm resistors (its was HARD trust me I took almost 2 months looking for them)., so I went ahead replaced the two mofset........... 15 mins and a lot of smoke later....... MAN,,,... the module can communicate with my Durametic tool...! HOWEVER,, all the antennas are reporting short to ground ERROR!!! I tried to clear it but the code come back instantly. then I went on to test the resistor value,... and found all six of the 0.22ohm resistors are SHORT (they are fusible resistor btw)....,,. sooooo I tried my best and finally able to locate those 0.22 ohm resistor .., fast forward 2 months later............ I received those resistors today.............. another 15 mins of smoke and sweat with my resoldering station... I plug the module back... run the scan tool clean the fault codes!!!!................... moment of truth,, I plug my dummy key in to the key cyclinder with the real key in my pocket!!!!!!!!!!!!! turn and the CAR STARTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I have successfully fixed a $3000 dollars repair (that don't guarantee will work) with 5 dollars worth of resistors !!!!!! NOTE: IF your kessy don't communicate with the scan tool,. Its the TWO MOFSET that is Fried. if you have all antennas short to ground or not responding its the 6 resistors!
  4. 2 points
    Updated Mileage: 288,565. 2018 Round trips included NY to Seattle and NY to New Orleans. Still not driving as much as I'd like. #4 cylinder down to 75%. Trying to hold out to 300k before rebuild.
  5. 2 points
  6. 2 points
    I think you need option 666 or 619 for Bluetooth phone. 619 can be retrofitted, which is less expensive than 666. By the way, you can't update the system to v2.24 in one step. You have to update to v2.23 first. Your dealer should know this. I would try to find one who knows what they are doing. The 619 Mobile phone preparation retrofit involves fitting an additional microphone and entering an activation code for the Bluetooth using a PIWIS tester.
  7. 2 points
    15-year-old car - absolutely yes. Best to change every 5 years.
  8. 2 points
    Just in case anyone comes across this thread trying to solve unstable idle issues, bigbuzuki was on the right track. I replaced the vapor canister purge valve, pretty easy and inexpensive, and the crankcase breather check valve, even easier. the purge valve may have been a contributor, but the check valve was the main culprit. What is interesting here is that all of my ventilation hoses were intact and without leaks, but if you peered inside the removed check valve, you could clearly see that the membranes inside had completely disintegrated. That immediately did the trick.
  9. 2 points
    EDIT: Additional info added at bottom of tutorial, refers to recently found info, clarifying how many different fluids are needed for the 970 generation of Panamera PDK (at end of tutorial). Attached is a DIY for changing fluid on Panamera PDK transmission. Got this from a fellow forum member who happened to do the change. This should help many interested in doing maintenance on Panamera without paying thousands for it. Speaking to shop/dealer, after 60k, filter/pan replacement not absolutely necessary (cost of the kit is about $350). So for 60k, drain and refill fluid is fine. At 120k, you would do same fluid change, but this time replace the pan/filter as well. Read the entire DIY before you start to get a good idea of requirements and estimate time involvement for you to complete. Do not forget to replace the drain plug with its built in seal. Last thing you need is have a $15 part cause small leaking, and then have to put car up, open up drain plug, lose a bunch of expensive oil, just to put new drain plug in. So dont cut on this one part. You can get the Pentosine FFL3 PDK fluid directly from Porsche, or from Pentosine resellers. Porsche will charge you triple the price for identical fluid. You choose. Everything you need is mentioned in the DIY. Since Durametric does not have capability to monitor PDK temperature yet, you can use an IR thermometer, when you heat up the PDK to 40 celsius, after you put in 6-8 quarts or so, and when doing final level check. Good luck. 970 generation Panamera PDK transmission info: ZF is manufacturer of PDK transmission for Porsche They make 2 PDK transmissions One for mid & rear engine applications (911, boxter, etc) Another one specifically made for the Panamera Panamera PDK servicing requires two (2) fluids only (as compared to 3 fluids in other PDK car models at Porsche FFL3 fluid - Gearbox & clutches - need about 9 quarts Shell TF0951 - Front final drive - need about 0.4 quarts Here is the info dug up from ZF on this topic: "In fact, two separate DCT ranges or 'platforms' have been developed by ZF, both fitted with wet clutches, for use in Porsche's various longitudinal applications. The first is for use in the mid- and rear-engine sports cars (the 911, the Cayman and the Boxster), while a completely different platform has been developed for use in the larger Panamera. For each platform, two different torque options are available, with the 500N.m versions using an 'ND2015' clutch pack, and the 780N.m versions using an 'ND2216' clutch pack, both supplied by ZF Sachs....... In terms of the oil circuit itself, two completely different approaches have been employed for the two platforms. Non Panamera models: The 7DT45 and 7DT70 have two oil circuits, and hence two different oils; the first is Pentosin FFL-3 for the clutch and hydraulics, and the second is ExxonMobil Mobilube PTX 75W-90 for the gear-set and bevel gear. The oil levels have been kept as low as possible, to reduce churning losses for those moving parts that are immersed in oil. Panamera: Conversely, the 7DT75 has a single oil circuit and a dry sump (to minimize churning losses), with an 'active lubrication system' to feed oil to each gear-set and clutch. This version uses only the Pentosin FFL-3 lubricant, which was developed exclusively for the ZF DCTs. One of the main reasons for using a single oil circuit is that clutch cooling is required at both ends of the transmission, for the main dual-clutch module and for the hang-on clutch used in the four-wheel-drive variant. This would have presented significant sealing complications had multiple circuits been chosen." Bottom line: What this means is that the Panamera PDK uses transmission design which uses one fluid compartment for the gearbox and the clutches, and another separate compartment for the final drive. Two fluids total.
  10. 2 points
    It seems that there are more and more cases of these faults appearing, and as some of our cars are reaching 10-12 years old, it is hardly surprising. I've compiled this information from past personal experience on both of my 996s, reading about others on here and other forums, referring to the workshop manual and wiring diagrams, and applying some logic. Hopefully you might find it useful, and save some grief when troubleshooting. DOOR MICROSWITCHES There are seven microswitches in each door which control the alarm system. Two are separate switches: a] One on the outside door handle. This switch is used to sense that the handle is lifted. b] One on the inside door handle, which has the same function. When the car is unlocked and either handle is lifted, this signals the alarm control module (ACM) to lower the appropriate window by 10mm, and turn on the interior lights. As soon as the door opens, another switch inside the door lock (explained later) tells the ACM that the door is open, which holds the window down until the door is closed, when the window is raised, and the dimming timer on the interior lights is started. Once the car is locked, the outside handle switches are ignored by the ACM. The remaining five switches are inside the door lock assembly: c] One switch senses if the door is open or closed. d] One senses that the key has been turned to the 'lock' position. e] Another senses that the key has been turned to the 'unlock' position. f] One senses that the door lock motor has reached the 'lock' position. g] Another senses that the door lock motor has reached the 'unlock' position. TYPICAL FAULTS All these microswitches can be problematic, and it is common for one or more to fail at some time. These are some of the common failures and symptoms: 1) The door window won't drop when lifting a handle. This is usually the handle microswitch which has failed. 2) The window drops, but goes back up when the door opens, or when the handle is released. This can be the handle microswitch, or more likely the 'door open/closed microswitch' ( c ) has stuck. Because the system thinks the door is still closed, it sends the window back up. 3) Door window won't go up the last 10mm. This is likely to be the 'door open/closed microswitch' ( c ) stuck in the opposite sense to (2). The system thinks the door is still open, so won't allow the window to go back up. Note that in this case the door will still lock, but you may get a single-beep from the alarm horn. 4) Door will not lock with key. The 'key lock' microswitch (d) is broken. This is very rare, as this microswitch is hardly ever used – most times the car is locked by remote. 5) Door will not unlock with key. The 'key lock' microswitch (e) is broken. This is also very rare, for the same reason. 6) Door locks, and then immediately unlocks, usually accompanied by a double-beep from the alarm horn. This is the 'door locked' microswitch (f). The locking motor physically operates the door lock, but the microswitch to sense this has failed/stuck. The ACM promptly unlocks the car. In this case, the only way to lock the door is to use the emergency locking procedure. Turn the key in the door to the lock position and back three times in quick succession. 7) The door unlocks, but there is a beep or double-beep from the alarm horn. This is the 'door unlocked' microswitch (g). Although the door is unlocked, the ACM has not recognised that. The alarm will not sound, as turning the key in the lock has deactivated it. FIXES The inside and outside handle microswitches are available separately, and are not too expensive. Although alternative equivalent switches may be available, the genuine Porsche switch comes with a connector and wiring, so it makes sense to use an original. Part Numbers: Inside handle microswitch: 996.613.123.00 (Same both sides) Outside handle microswitch: 996.613.125.00 (Left) / 996.613.126.00 (Right) The door lock microswitches are not available separately. You have to buy the complete door lock assembly, at a cost of around $120. It has been known for people to repair the offending switch though. This is a picture of a typical failure of a 'door open/close' microswitch (courtesy of another RennTech member): You can see that the plastic plunger has broken, jamming the switch lever inside. These switches are (apparently) made by Burgess, but as yet the source and part number are unknown. There are several other similar standard switches on the market for around $2, and people have stripped down the new switch and rebuilt the old one with the plunger from the new one. OTHER SWITCHES IN THE ALARM SYSTEM The other switches and contacts in the alarm system are to monitor the lid closures: Front lid microswitch Rear lid microswitch Oddment compartment microswitch Glove box microswitch Radio contact (to detect radio theft) An open compartment or switch failure will cause a single-beep of the alarm horn on locking. A system error will cause a double-beep. Other elements of the system include an interior monitoring sensor (in the overhead lighting), an alarm readiness light (on the dashboard in the centre) and a central locking button (on the dashboard). Options are a tilt sensor (next to the battery or under the left-hand seat) and an alarm siren (next to the battery).
  11. 2 points
    I got sick of not having cupholders in my Boxster. So I set out to find some. The options seemed to be OEM cupholders, either the clip on type, or the single DIN type. And we all know the problems with those - not secure enough fit, not accommodating large cups, etc. Also, the DIN type takes up an entire vertical DIN slot, making fitting double DIN GPS impossible. Other solutions seem to be to use a cutout for cups in the centre console box - which means the lid needs to stay open; and "ultimate cupholder" - which doesn't look OEM at all. So I was searching for generic cupholders on Ebay, and found this: http://cgi.ebay.com....=item439b780b6e And from a seller, the dimensions are: 7 7/16" long by 1" just the cover lid, assembly is 7" x 4 3/4" The width is as close to OEM fit for the Boxster as it gets, for a non-Porsche part! So I bought it. Realising that late model VWs like Passat and Jetta has the same console width as our Boxster, I then bought this: http://cgi.ebay.com....=item3ca672b7af It's entirely possible that other units like this http://cgi.ebay.com....=item3356ef534c would also fit. And before you start, get a rotary tool (like a Dremel). It's an absolute god send! Made things so easy. Here is the unit: Compared to another double DIN unit I originally planned for the mod: The difference is the newer one has a hi res screen. I actually rather liked the volume knob on the low res one. I put the cupholder and GPS unit together, with double sided tape, like this: You can also mount the cupholder on top, like this: I chose to go with the bottom fit, because I don't really like cups placed that high, and the bottom fit actually takes up a few mm less in height, which gives a better fit in the horseshoe frame. Speaking of frame, it's cut up, like this: There was a lip on the inner aspect of the lower border, this was cut to make room to increase the height. This, together with some slight sanding of the bottom of the cupholder was all that's required to make the height of the combo fit just right. Incredibly lucky! Note, you must get rid of the lower lip much as you can. Or the cupholder would be clamped too tight between the frame and the GPS, and it doesn't open when clamped tight. In the above picture, you can see I turned the OEM metal bracket around. This was necessary as the cupholder doesn't extend as deep as the OEM stereo, so the bracket support needs to come forward. You need to drill a hole in the original bracket to allow this. The reason will be very apparent when you actually do this. Here is a close up of the reversed bracket: The GPS antenna is simply placed near the alarm cover. Remove the alarm cover first, thread the GPS wire through, then just fish for it through the horseshoe frame. No need to remove anything else to place the GPS antenna. The thick wire attached to the GPS wire is the loom for my Head-Up-Display (another mod, for another day) :) The rest of the wiring here, with the unit ready to be pushed in: Here is the test fit: You can see that I will need a "n" shaped bezel to fill out the gap. This was obtained by modifying the Passat bezel that came with the GPS. The width is an exact fit, just like the cupholder (maybe 1mm longer, but I just left it). So I just sanded down the top border of the frame. And cut off the bottom border. I don't have a picture with the bottom border removed, only with the thinned top border: Press it in, it's a snug fit, not even sticky taped. And voooowwlaahhh!!!! OEM look!! From afar: With cupholder open: With a large "cup": In summary, get a genuine Jetta cupholder and an aftermarket Passat double DIN GPS! (not affliated with the seller/s, I promise) :)
  12. 2 points
    If your battery is dead and you need to get into the front trunk, it may be necessary to locate the manual pull wire to open the front trunk and get to the battery. This might be more difficult to locate the first time. You may not be in a good location to wrestle the right front tire splash guard to find it. It might be night time or you may not be dressed in the correct clothes to be down by the tires trying to locate it. I would recommend that you take the time to locate it in good weather and in the comfort of your garage or better yet re-route the wire to the front bumper behind the plastic plug the hides the location for the tow fish eye bolt. To get started I removed the carpet liner in the front trunk. The front trunk liner is made up of 2 sections and I only had to remove the front section. There was one thumbscrew clip on the passenger side and one thumbscrew clip opposite on the driver's side. Also on the driver's side there was one snapin clip and 2 additional snapin clips located in the front of the trunk. All five clips are very easy to find and remove. I then removed the plastic trim directly on top of the front trunk latch and microswitch. There are 4 screw plugs and you simply turn the plastic plugs 1/4 to 1/2 of a turn: I then removed the passenger side head lamp by using the tool in the Boxster tool kit. The kit is usually located near the spare tire in the front trunk. Turn the wrentch about 1/2 turn counter clockwise to unlock the headlamp. Slide the head lamp out. You may have to jiggle it a little but it should slide out with very little effort. Once the light is out you will be able to locate the pull wire. It is clamped into a lasso at the end. In the photo below you can see it at the end of the red arrow. The red oval in the top of the photo is the plastic wheel splash guard. The passenger front tire is directly behind that. Some recommend to access the pull wire from the tire side but that is a little more difficult and you still have the problem of trying to re-rout the wire up to the front bumber. Doing it from the head lamp side makes it easy. Here is another photo with my finger pointing at the pull wire. Remove the front bumper plastic cover that hides the tow plug. I used a plastic upholstery tool and the plastic cap popped right out. The plug has a fishline wire connected to it to prevent you from losing it. Use the light from a flashlight to guide you (from the front bumber side) and re-route the pull wire from the headlight to the tow plug. Having the top plastic guard off makes this very easy. Tuck the pull wire back in and re-insert the pastic bumber plug. Reassembly is just the reverse. Slide the headlamp back into the guides and push it home, use the wrentch and turn clock wise. you will hear a loud pop when the headlamp is secured. You know have easy access to the emergency pull wire.
  13. 1 point
    This is exactly were everyone that thinks they can do better themselves goes wrong. The LN ceramic hybrid bearings cannot be "sourced from hundreds of places for a variety of prices". The LN bearing is the final result of a lot of R&D, trying out various bearing materials until they fail, to identify the best selection of components for the final bearing. And as that design is produced exclusively for them, you are going to have a very difficult time replicating their results Good luck...…………..
  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
    I would say the top unit is a knock off. We have had absolutely no luck with aftermarket AOS units, some even failing right out of the box. Considering how annoying they can be to swap out, it ain’t worth the price differential.
  16. 1 point
    I received a call from Jake and he said they started assembly work on the motor this week. Right on schedule with the dates he gave me back in August. Pictures coming soon.
  17. 1 point
    Noted! Mechanical pressure gauge ordered. Will update when I have actual oil pressure values.
  18. 1 point
    I would put a mechanical pressure gauge on it before doing anything else; you need to know what the actual pressure is before doing anything else.
  19. 1 point
    Sounds good! Parts are on the way. Will also replace the oil pressure sender, since it´s cheap and apparently tend to fail over time, as I can read. As I can see, the easiest way to access the oil pressure sender is from the top - with the engine top cover removed. Is that correct?
  20. 1 point
    The 2 rear tires should be the same size and manufacture model as the 2 front new tires. Workshop mode, ask them to check the voltage on the TPMS, balancing, and all 4 tire wheel alignment.
  21. 1 point
  22. 1 point
    Per the photos on Pelican of those two hoses, it looks like the one ending with "-05", which includes the small T nipple section.
  23. 1 point
  24. 1 point
    Welcome to RennTech I would ask your tech how he determined the AOS is bad, and what does he base his RMS/IMS seal leakage upon. 20 hours is excessive, more like 8-10 hours is realistic to pull the Tip and replace both the AOS and either the RMS or IMS seals. I would also check with another Porsche oriented shop for a second opinion.
  25. 1 point
    Check out this thread. Sunroof drain - 6SpeedOnline - Porsche Forum and Luxury Car Resource WWW.6SPEEDONLINE.COM Cayenne Turbo - Sunroof drain - I Know this is discussed 1000 Times . Problem with clogged drains. Acces from The sunroof is easy. But i would like to Know where are this tubes ending. Where is the Exit. Somewhere in the Engine compartment? Or this Place behind the Wheel well liner? Thank you for assistance. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  26. 1 point
    Hi, Would anyone have a pdf version of the 2019 .2 3 RS owner's manual to share ? Thanks. Leong
  27. 1 point
    The car has to be programmed to the Kessy fob (not the other way around). You must have the car's security codes and use a Porsche PIWIS tester. There is no other way that I am aware of. You need to find a shop with a Porsche PIWIS tester and then you as the legal car owner needs to go a Porsche dealer and request your security codes - you may be required to show proof of ownership.
  28. 1 point
    I just installed a Pioneer AVH-2440NEX, Metra 99-9604b dash kit and Scosche LPPE15 wiring interface from Crutchfield in my 2005 Cayenne. Absolutely terrific sound. Existing amplifier and subwoofer work great. I highly recommend using their $25 ReadyHarness Service tp pre-wire everything. Like others in this forum, I needed to trim the dash plate to get a nice flush mount. The USB AUX adapter from Amazon fits perfectly in an unused dash hole. Total installation was was less than $700. $350 for the radio and about the same for the harnesses. The Axxess ASWC-1 steering wheel control adapter is not needed. A 3.5m plug on the adapter fits in the back of the radio and gives steering wheel volume and track control.
  29. 1 point
    Here is my engine number for a 99 C2 with a manufactured date of 7/98 (thus my car has an engine made in 98). So from your description M96/04, from Model Year 2001, 661 should be the next sequence, and the last five digits are the engine serial numbers, ranging from 00501 to 60000. Yours is 14453.
  30. 1 point
    Just acquired my first Cayman, a 2012 R. First impressions are I love it, very impressed.
  31. 1 point
    If you PM me your VIN I can check and see what your car came with. Though, the springs could have been changed by previous owner (if there was one).
  32. 1 point
    Knowing a bit about electronics in general, I would say that if there's a Aux Battery and it's got a problem then it's going to continue to be a problem while connected to the system. But I will defer to those gurus with the noggin voodoo (vast knowledge).
  33. 1 point
    Hi to anyone who had this exact problem i have found a solution. after i changed my undamaged water pump and thermostat i got temp gauge dead and flashing. changed coolant sensor, to no avail. turns out that i needed to clear error codes with code reader and that instantly bought the gauge to life back to normal. 2.7 boxster 2001
  34. 1 point
    Unclip control unit from the holder A. Release electric connector A and remove it from control unit.
  35. 1 point
    Small world. While it is currently closed for Jan and Feb for some renovations, visit the museum when you get the chance, particularly if you have kids, as it is focused on education about the heritage, history, and wildlife of the Chesapeake of southern Maryland, much of which has disappeared over the last fifty years. And there are several excellent seafood restaurants on Solomons Island as well. http://www.calvertmarinemuseum.com
  36. 1 point
    ALL factory reman engines carry “AT” in the number sequence to indicate it is a factory reman. Yours many simply be a replacement from another source like a wreck.
  37. 1 point
    M96/04 66Y is a 2000 MY engine, so it may be original. No way to tell if it is a single row or double row IMSB. MY 2000 is when they began a mix of engines with both dual row and then single row bearings. Just factor in having the bearing replaced, with the LN Solution being the best.
  38. 1 point
    I would pretty much forget trying to install new liners yourself, it requires both special equipment and knowledge. LN Engineering is were most shops send their bare engine cases to have new liners installed.
  39. 1 point
    Hello, The rubber driveshaft support mount went out on me during travelling. I thought the tire was going major out of balance. Anyway I considered to buy $300+ replacement support, but did this: It is a hack, but the purpose of support mount is to absorb vibration and the heater hose can do that fine. It does not rotate, put significant load, etc. I also needed to repair right away and not wait for parts to arrive. The culprit is on rear driveshaft. I used: (it really is $2 and 2 hours of time) 9 pcs 5/8" ID heater hose (3/4"OD), $2, 1.5~2" long pieces. (1" as in the Utube is just enough length, give a little extra) 14pcs 8" ziptie wire cutter to cut the ziptie 2L plastic bottle; cut a piece and wrap around shaft+bearing to help hoses slide it in, and remove after. don't use 500ml drink bottles, too thin and will rip upon removal. Use hand sanitizer to lube up to ease install onto bearing. They evaporate and will contact tightly to bracket and bearing. Several razor blade/utility knife to cut away remaining rubber mount. Replace frequently, sharp blades work much better. Its the most time consuming. Dont have to be perfect just cut off most of old rubber. Wear mechanics glove to prevent injuring hands. 13mm + 16mm and impact driver or rachet if not lazy eye protection someone on Utube suggested to cut 45 degree on end to ease install onto bearing. I don't suggest it, reduces surface area, and not necessary if using 2L plastic piece to guide hoses onto bearing. Install the hose assembly inside bracket, then slide it onto bearing.
  40. 1 point
    I had just read they moved it to under the dash right when you posted, thank you. Found out from the inspector that the car doesn't run cause.....it doesn't have a battery. DUH
  41. 1 point
    I had this same issue and the fault was the magnets on the circuit board under the shift lever the circuit board had cracked allowing the magnets to get out of alignment and send false signals
  42. 1 point
    Glad to hear you got it sorted without splitting the case!
  43. 1 point
    Welcome to RennTech. This is what happens when someone looks at a problem, immediately comes to a conclusion and proceeds without actually doing any diagnostics. From the beginning, the rotors should have been checked with a dial indicator for run out and trueness. If the hubs were bad, the discs would have run true, pointing the tech elsewhere. The front hubs should have also been checked at the same time, just to make sure they were not contributing to the problem. Obviously, this was not done as build up on the hubs is often a give away that something is wrong with them. Everyone seems to have overlooked the obvious on their way to the expedient. While it is not going to help your wallet, get the car looked at and fixed by someone that knows what they are doing. This car should be an absolute blast to drive, and once corrected, you will quickly forget about the cost getting to that point. Good luck.
  44. 1 point
    This is going to become a more and more common problem as the components used in this circuitry get older. It is basically the same in the Audi A8, the VW Touareg and the Cayenne. The official Porsche solution is to buy a new steering column, which including removal costs, replacement and recoding will run around $4000. There are some alternatives. Tom at Speedometer solutions in Chicago is very capable of fixing the actual problem, but you will need to send him the steering lock module (not too bad to remove but not for the feint of heart) as well as the kessy module and a functional key. The total cost for this depends on whether the lock was active or not, which decides if you can get the lock off with everything in place, or if you have to remove the steering column to get it removed. I would say removal costs will be around $250 or so. Tom charges $399 to repair the module and GUARANTEES his work. The last alternative is to get all the necessary parts from a junkyard, but you will need the lock from the steering column, the kessy as well as the keys. You will then use all of the new electronics, and switch the blade from your old key. I have no idea what you could get such a set for but it will all need to be matching. Once these things are programmed, there is NO reprogramming. I have just gone through this, and my car is back on the road after spending less than $500. Sucks but better than $4k...
  45. 1 point
    Problem SOLVED. The switch is located underneath the driver's seat, just to the left of the battery box. The switch is easily accessed through the outboard most pre-cut section of carpet joined with a plastic cover (see photo). If you remove the seat and peel back the pre-cut carpet covering the battery you will have a much better view. BTW, the seat is very easy to remove. This switch has got some funky design features. The last 3 pictures should illustrate the features and the solution to my problem. Notice the channel that guides the sliding switch is in the shape of a C. I believe the FORWARD position allows the switch to be locked into what I would call Discharge Protection Manual Engagement--use this position when storing or transporting your vehicle to help prevent battery discharge. The AFT and OUT position is where the switch is located after an automatic triggering of the Discharge Protection logic (think circuit breaker tripped position). With the switch in any position between here and FWD, the Discharge Protection remains active. The AFT and IN position is visually not very distinct from the AFT and OUT position. I found it basically by accident and it is more easily determined to be in the correct position by feel rather than visually. The switch on my vehicle does not naturally "like" to go into that position, it takes a little finagling. Verify it's in the correct position by turning the ignition ON and observing the lack of Discharge Protection caution message/yellow battery indication on the MFD. I suppose this switch tripped because my old battery was weak and/or during the replacement due to low voltage from my jump start pack. Confounding the problem is the switch design--in the darkness of an underseat switch you might think that it just moves forward and aft. You might also not perceive the approximately 1mm difference in position from normal to tripped. Also a switch label and/or a mention in the manual wouldn't hurt!
  46. 1 point
    I just started replacing my valve cover gaskets and have one done already. I know your post is from 2 years ago but I would like to thank you. The pictures you posted of the cut down torx bit and the A/C plug were instrumental in me keeping my sanity during this project.
  47. 1 point
    Yes, the Tip controller can not switch the valve if it is off (fuse removed) - nor can the vacuum valve switch with the engine off.
  48. 1 point
    Just want to add to this topic to help those who are struggling to put the gear shifter back on. The secret to making sure the button will work it to shake the gear shifter. Hear that rattle? We've got to stop that. Here's how: 1) Hold the shifter horizontal so the button is facing the floor. 2) Insert a small watchmaker's screwdriver up between the edge of the button and the leather of the shifter on the same horizontal plane as the shifter 3) With the screwdriver in place, give the shifter a shake. If you don't hear a rattle it means you have correctly trapped the mechanism within the shifter in the right place. 4) With the screwdriver still in place push the shifter back into position in the car. making sure the car is in 'D' 5) There should be a satisfying click when the shifter is in place. When you hear this, remove the screwdriver and you will have a working button. Hope this helps
  49. 1 point
    Easiest way to remove the fuel door without breaking or scratching anything is to use a mini pair of longnose needle nose pliers. "Not a Screwdriver". I was able to remove the fuel door hinge in about 30 seconds. use the pliers to pinch the locking lugs. 1.Stick the pliers into the upper section A and pinch the lugs while pulling up slightly. You will hear & feel the upper section of the hinge pull up slightly (about 1/8" inch)
  50. 1 point
    Basically it is engine at operating conditions (i.e. warmed up). Secondary Air Diagnostic conditions - Battery positive voltage between 10 V and 16 V - Time after engine starts > 1 second EVAP Diagnostic conditions – V8 - Battery positive voltage between 10 V and 16 V - Time after engine starts > 11 minutes and 30 seconds - Idle speed - All oxygen sensors ready for operation - No oxygen sensor fault stored - No tank vent driver fault stored
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