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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/28/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time: ~2 hours If you’re getting a Durametric error code P0674, you likely have a bad PCV valve that needs to be replaced. An easy way to test a bad PCV valve is to unscrew the oil fill cap on the engine while it is idling. If you feel suction on the cap and/or the idle fluctuates once the cap is removed then your PCV valve is bad. The PCV valve is built into the valve cover so your options are to buy a whole new valve cover assembly (95510513500- ~$347) or buy just the PCV membrane (aftermarket $20-25) and replace it in your existing valve cover. To get access to the valve cover, you will need to follow this DIY article to remove the intake manifold first. Other reasons to remove the intake manifold are to service your fuel injectors or to make it much easier to replace the thermostat. The thermostat can be changed without removing the intake manifold (I did it twice), however you basically need to be a contortionist to reach the bolts to remove housing and you will scrape some knuckles along the way. Tools Needed: -Flathead screwdriver -Assortment of torx bits (T20, T25, T30, 6” long T30) -Pliers -Torque Wrench -3/8” ratchet set with various extensions and a universal joint -1 1/16” Deep socket -10mm Triple Square Spline Bit -Crescent Wrench -9/16” Open End Wrench -Dental pick Parts Needed: -Brake Booster Vacuum Hose- 95535557941 (your existing hose is probably brittle and will likely crack from removing it, I recommend getting a new one) -Lower Fuel Injector Seal Kit (3X) - 95511091000 (existing seals may be brittle and once you have removed the intake manifold, they may not seal properly upon reinstallation, I recommend getting new ones, need 3 sets) Procedure: First start by removing the plastic covers surrounding the engine. Using a flathead screwdriver, remove the quarter turn plastic trim fasteners. Rotate them in either direction by 90 degrees and pop them out. Be ready to catch them as sometimes they like to jump out. Next you will need to remove the 2 torx screws on either side of the engine cover with a T25 bit and the screw under the windshield washer reservoir cap with a T20 bit. Remove the oil fill cap and front engine cover by pulling straight up. They are held on by friction rings around a stud so pulling straight up will release it. Now that you have the covers removed, it’s time to remove the intake filter box and intake piping. Using your T25 torx bit, rotate the 2 screws until the dot on the screwhead lines up with the lower indication on the filter cover. Now gently use your pliers to pull them straight out. With your flathead screwdriver, pop up the two clips to release the filter housing. Pivot the filter house towards the passenger side of the car and remove it. Remove the engine air filter as well. Next, remove the wiring harness from the MAF sensor located in the middle of the intake piping. Loosen the clamp around the intake piping on the throttle body and gently work the intake piping back and forth until it releases from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt on the engine lift bracket and loosen the lower bolt with your M10 triple square bit. Then pivot the bracket towards the front of the car. Remove the bolt next to the throttle body with your M10 triple square bit. Then unplug the wire harness from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt from the bracket on the passenger side of the engine with your M10 triple square bit. Remove the vacuum lines from the intake manifold on the passenger side of the engine. One hose requires pliers to open the hose clamp, the other can be removed by hand if you squeeze the lock ring around the hose to release it. Next, from the passenger side, reach your hand around to the back side of the engine. There is a vacuum line that goes from the bottom surface of the intake manifold to the brake booster. You will need to pull the vacuum line fitting straight down to pop it out of the intake manifold. I don't have a good picture of it so here is a diagram of it. Pull down on the elbow fitting, not the hose. Also on the back side of the engine just behind the vacuum line you removed there is a bolt that needs to be removed using your M10 triple square bit. You are working blindly so locate the bolt first by feel and guide your bit to the bolt. Remove the 3 screws holding the actuator with a T25 torx bit. Slowly pull it straight out towards the front of the car. There is an actuator arm that attaches to a shaft on the passenger side of the part. Once you have enough clearance to reach your finger in there, you need to slide the arm off the shaft as you pull the entire actuator off. Then disconnect the vacuum hose from the actuator. Now pull the coolant hoses out of their holder in the intake manifold and push it towards the driver side of the car. There is a T25 torx screw that attaches this water hose bracket near the back of the intake manifold. The screw is facing up, so you need to use your T25 torx bit and get creative with removing that screw. I used a crescent wrench to turn the torx bit while holding the torx bit in place with my other hand. With the water hose bracket free, slide the water hose bracket towards the front of the car to release it from the intake manifold. This bracket has a keyhole slot that will release once it's slid forward. Remove the oil dipstick tube bracket with a T25 torx bit. Just push it out of the way once you remove the screw. With your long T30 torx bit, remove the bolt on the intake manifold that was under the actuator. Next, there are 3 blind holes on the driver side of the intake manifold. You need to use your long T30 torx bit to loosen the screws inside those holes. Those 3 screws are captive screws so they will not come out. There are 3 bolts below the intake runners. They need to be removed with your M10 triple square bit. This is where your universal joint will come in handy. The bolt near the rear of the engine required me to use my u-joint with various entensions to acess. At this point, you will hear gas leaking out. Since you have released the pressure from the lower fuel rail to the lower fuel injectors, the pressurized gas in the rail will leak out. Make sure you are working in a well ventilated area. From the driver side of the car, reach behind the engine to remove the wire harness from the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 1 1/16” deep socket, unscrew and remove the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 9/16” open wrench, unscrew the nut that connects the metal fuel line running from the lower fuel rail. The slimmer your wrench the better. My crescent wrench did not fit here. Now that the intake manifold is completely unbolted, you can start to wiggle it free. You will need to lift the manifold up from the passenger side and pivot it up towards the driver side. You will need to wiggle the lower fuel rail loose to release the metal fuel line you just unscrewed the nut from. It is a flare fitting that pushes into the upper fuel rail assembly. Be gentle here as you don’t want to bend the fuel rail. Once the metal fuel line is free from the upper assembly, you can remove the intake manifold as described above by lifting up from the passenger side first to pivot it off. At this point, you have access to the fuel injectors if you need to service them, the thermostat housing and the valve cover. Unbolting the valve cover is straight forward from here if you need to replace the PCV valve, etc. The fuel injector seal kit comes with a rubber o-ring, Teflon o-ring, Teflon sleeve and metal clip. At the bare minimum you should replace the rubber o-ring and Teflon o-ring. Use a dental pick to remove the old o-rings. These 2 parts are the wear surface when you remove/reinstall the intake manifold and are prone to fail if you re-use them. Trust me, I learned the hard way. To install the intake manifold, reverse the steps above. Take care in sliding the lower fuel rail back onto the lower fuel injectors and lining up the metal fuel line back into the flare fitting. I found it was easier to pull the lower fuel line out of the manifold to line the flare fitting up first, then pushing it into place in the intake manifold. You want to apply even pressure on the surface as you tighten all 7 of the bolts down on the driver side. Torque the 3 triple square bolts evenly to 6 ft lbs, torque angle 90 degrees, then a final torque of 22 ft lbs. The bolts holding the engine lift bracket are 17 ft lbs, the other triple square bolts holding the manifold on the head are 15 ft lbs. Once you get it all back together, turn the key to the ON then START position without your foot on the brake. This will run the fuel pumps to build pressure back up in the fuel rail. I removed the key and repeated 2-3 times to get the fuel pressure up. The first time you restart, it may take a couple seconds to fire up due to the fuel pressure needing to build back up. If you replaced your PCV valve, it may idle rough as the ECU needs to remap since it adapted to a leaking PCV valve over time. If you did not replace the fuel injector seals and smell gas/hear it leaking after shutting off the engine, then your seals failed and you need to repeat the procedure and replace those seals.
  2. 3 points
    Updated Mileage: 288,565. 2018 Round trips included NY to Seattle and NY to New Orleans. Still not driving as much as I'd like. #4 cylinder down to 75%. Trying to hold out to 300k before rebuild.
  3. 2 points
    Front trunk, rear engine cover, doors, center console, interior sensor.
  4. 2 points
    The horn beeps and lights flashing is the alarm system telling you there is a alarm system zone fault somewhere. Could be an open (or maybe in this case closed/locked when it should be open) zone. Zones are: drivers/passenger doors, trunk lid, engine lid, glass (targa) top, gas cap lid, center console lid, and if you have it the glove box door. There are also two interior sensors in the overhead that detect motion when the car is locked. I think getting to the battery and disconnecting is a good idea. However, you have a problem since the trunk is not opening. First thing to try is actually seeing if the trunk is already open. Put your fingers under the trunk lid and try pulling up. Second is to locate the emergency release cable under the passenger side headlight. Unfortunately you need to pop the headlight out to make this a simple exercise, and you can't do that without opening the trunk. So you have to pull the passenger wheel well liner and fish out the cable from behind. Hopefully your wheel lock socket is not in your trunk!
  5. 2 points
    EDIT: Additional info added at bottom of tutorial, refers to recently found info, clarifying how many different fluids are needed for the 970 generation of Panamera PDK (at end of tutorial). Attached is a DIY for changing fluid on Panamera PDK transmission. Got this from a fellow forum member who happened to do the change. This should help many interested in doing maintenance on Panamera without paying thousands for it. Speaking to shop/dealer, after 60k, filter/pan replacement not absolutely necessary (cost of the kit is about $350). So for 60k, drain and refill fluid is fine. At 120k, you would do same fluid change, but this time replace the pan/filter as well. Read the entire DIY before you start to get a good idea of requirements and estimate time involvement for you to complete. Do not forget to replace the drain plug with its built in seal. Last thing you need is have a $15 part cause small leaking, and then have to put car up, open up drain plug, lose a bunch of expensive oil, just to put new drain plug in. So dont cut on this one part. You can get the Pentosine FFL3 PDK fluid directly from Porsche, or from Pentosine resellers. Porsche will charge you triple the price for identical fluid. You choose. Everything you need is mentioned in the DIY. Since Durametric does not have capability to monitor PDK temperature yet, you can use an IR thermometer, when you heat up the PDK to 40 celsius, after you put in 6-8 quarts or so, and when doing final level check. Good luck. 970 generation Panamera PDK transmission info: ZF is manufacturer of PDK transmission for Porsche They make 2 PDK transmissions One for mid & rear engine applications (911, boxter, etc) Another one specifically made for the Panamera Panamera PDK servicing requires two (2) fluids only (as compared to 3 fluids in other PDK car models at Porsche FFL3 fluid - Gearbox & clutches - need about 9 quarts Shell TF0951 - Front final drive - need about 0.4 quarts Here is the info dug up from ZF on this topic: "In fact, two separate DCT ranges or 'platforms' have been developed by ZF, both fitted with wet clutches, for use in Porsche's various longitudinal applications. The first is for use in the mid- and rear-engine sports cars (the 911, the Cayman and the Boxster), while a completely different platform has been developed for use in the larger Panamera. For each platform, two different torque options are available, with the 500N.m versions using an 'ND2015' clutch pack, and the 780N.m versions using an 'ND2216' clutch pack, both supplied by ZF Sachs....... In terms of the oil circuit itself, two completely different approaches have been employed for the two platforms. Non Panamera models: The 7DT45 and 7DT70 have two oil circuits, and hence two different oils; the first is Pentosin FFL-3 for the clutch and hydraulics, and the second is ExxonMobil Mobilube PTX 75W-90 for the gear-set and bevel gear. The oil levels have been kept as low as possible, to reduce churning losses for those moving parts that are immersed in oil. Panamera: Conversely, the 7DT75 has a single oil circuit and a dry sump (to minimize churning losses), with an 'active lubrication system' to feed oil to each gear-set and clutch. This version uses only the Pentosin FFL-3 lubricant, which was developed exclusively for the ZF DCTs. One of the main reasons for using a single oil circuit is that clutch cooling is required at both ends of the transmission, for the main dual-clutch module and for the hang-on clutch used in the four-wheel-drive variant. This would have presented significant sealing complications had multiple circuits been chosen." Bottom line: What this means is that the Panamera PDK uses transmission design which uses one fluid compartment for the gearbox and the clutches, and another separate compartment for the final drive. Two fluids total.
  6. 2 points
    Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. (Edit - July 25, 2006 - Updated the clutch bleeding procedure to the latest procedure as outlined in supplement 98 of the Carrera Service Manual - Loren) Parts you will need: 1 liter (minimum) 000 043 203 66 Porsche DOT 4 Brake Fluid or equal (ATE Gold or ATE Super Blue) Tools you will need: Jack 19 mm socket for wheel bolts Motive Power Bleeder (or equal) image Needle Nose Pliers 11 mm wrench for brakes; 9 mm for clutch slave (sizes vary from car to car but they are usually 9 mm or 11 mm) Plastic tubing and waste container (at least 1 liter) Jack up the vehicle at the lift points provided and remove the rear wheel (you will need to do this for each wheel). Remove the cap on the master cylinder reservoir. Remove the plastic screen using a pair of needle nose pliers. This can be a little bit challenging but it will pop off (be careful with the brake fluid.. it eats paint!) Use a syringe (or turkey baster... just don't reuse it) and suck out as much of the old fluid as possible. Fill the master cylinder reservoir with new fluid. Put the rest in the power bleeder. Screw the cap that came with the power bleeder onto the master cylinder reservoir. Put the pressure cap with the pump handle on the power bleeder and pump it up to just under 20 psi - do not go over 20 psi! Bleed order - Right rear, Left rear, Right front, Left front. Place your drain tube over the outside bleed nipple and in the bottle (remember it will need to hold a liter when you are done). Bleed the outer bleeder valve first. Open each bleeder valve until clear, bubble free brake fluid emerges. Take care to bleed at each brake caliper and at both bleeder valves. Carefully tighten the bleed screw. Wipe off the area and replace the rubber protective cap over the bleed screw. Repeat steps 8-10 for the interior bleed screw. Then reinstall the wheel and move on to the next wheel. Note: It makes sense to check the pressure and amount of fluid in the tank between wheels. Running out of fluid means starting over and getting air out. Optional Clutch Bleeding This is best done when you are bleeding the left (driver's side) rear wheel as the clutch bleed valve is mounted high above the axle on the transmission. Push the clutch pedal in by hand (very slowly) and use a long piece of wood to hold the pedal down. I wedged the other end (of the wood) between the seat and door frame -- with plenty of soft padding to avoid scratches. A second option is to have a 2nd person sit in the car and keep the clutch pedal FULLY depressed. Open the clutch bleeder valve until clear, bubble free brake fluid emerges (at least 30 seconds according to Porsche). Remove the wood. Then, pump the pedal again very slowly by hand for a further 60 seconds. After pressing the pedal down fully about 10 to 15 times, leave the pedal in its normal position. After allowing a fill time of 90 seconds, check that no more air bubbles appear at the bleeder valve (use a collecting bottle with a transparent hose). Then close the bleeder valve. Wipe off the area and replace the rubber protective cap over the bleed screw. You may notice that the clutch pedal does not return... so carefully pull it up (slowly) to it's normal position. Then depress it (slowly) a few (at least 5) times. In a few cycles the feel should return. [*]Torque the wheels bolts to 96 ftlb. (130 Nm). [*]Do a final check on the brake fluid level and top up if needed.
  7. 1 point
    996 Ignition Switch replace (just the switch) with pictures First off - thanks to everyone who has been down this road before me for providing tips and suggestions and troubleshooting regarding this common problem. I have been dealing with a key that would stay all the way to the right upon starting meaning that the A/C, heated seats and some other items would not function. My solution had been to simply start the car and then just move the key back one notch to the left and everything worked fine. So if others have that issue, my original solution Author scb71 Category Carrera (996) - Common Fixes and Repairs Submitted 09/16/2009 01:31 PM Updated 03/13/2017 05:24 AM  
  8. 1 point
    Probably not, the stalk functions as a momentary contact switch, if the mirror selector switch is on/off in two of the four positions, that would cause the OBC to continuously cycle in those position. You are also going to either purchase a premade aftermarket wiring harnesses for the cluster to function with either a dash switch or with the fourth stalk, or make up your own. Fabing your own is going to require finding specific size pin connectors to match the connectors already in the dash. VW used to carry them. It is much cleaner to use the fourth stalk, which can actually added without taking the column apart, or simply source the four stalk multifunctional switch and replace the three stalk. We have done several of these, but always replaced the multifunction switch with the four stalk version to retain the clean factory look to the conversion. If your dash displays the outside temp, the system is active.
  9. 1 point
  10. 1 point
  11. 1 point
    You can drain some oil by simply dropping the oil filter and draining the canister. A lot better than trying to control the flow from the drain plug. And yes ^^^ these cars are very sensitive to over fill. Maybe contact the "Porsche shop" that overfilled your oil and ask them to do it.
  12. 1 point
    I would spend the money for a CarFax report... Ask to see the paperwork for service and repairs. Go through every knob and accessory to be sure everything works. If something doesn't it doesn't mean you're not buying the car, but can be a negotiating tool for a better price.
  13. 1 point
    You need to track down the leak - either AC drain or roof trains are likely plugged.
  14. 1 point
    Unless your fault code is exactly the same as the original poster you are likely just guessing. Best to get a Porsche fault code reader and see what your fault code(s) are.
  15. 1 point
    I’m not surprised that anyone would not honor any warranty after it has expired; that is why it has a date on it. Also not surprised about your comment on the EPS bearing, falls into the rules of small numbers.
  16. 1 point
    Welcome to RennTech Try contacting board sponsors Sunset Porsche in Beaverton OR.
  17. 1 point
  18. 1 point
    Hi there I’m thinking maybe your condenser fan is not working properly or is clogged with debris I’d start there. If the system is cooling when you are moving down the road I would say that is a likely culprit.
  19. 1 point
    The correct filter for an early 996 is the 986-307-403-00, which was also used in the Boxster.
  20. 1 point
    Are you sure you have not already moved it enough for the alternator right side to come up? Pull right side bolt all the way out and see if you can lift the right side up and out. It might be a little bit of a struggle but if it moves up you can get it out. I remember I had to go back and forth a few times, bolt in and whack, bolt out and try to lift, bolt back in and whack even harder, bolt out and test lift again.
  21. 1 point
    Yes, I agree...I will buy one from the dealer next and see if there is any noticeable difference.
  22. 1 point
    I would say the top unit is a knock off. We have had absolutely no luck with aftermarket AOS units, some even failing right out of the box. Considering how annoying they can be to swap out, it ain’t worth the price differential.
  23. 1 point
    I'm wondering if it has to do with the ECU (Electronic Control Unit) since you normally need to configure any changes to the instrument cluster back with the ECU on most cars. I remember looking at what it takes to replace an instrument cluster on my Audi, but since it needs to be secure so you can't mess with the mileage, you needed to configure any new dash with the ECU.
  24. 1 point
  25. 1 point
    LN wrote up the 3 and 5 chain instructions, available online, which should be followed. My personal preference on three chains is to pull all the tensioners.
  26. 1 point
    Joe is right and I stand corrected. #1 and #3 are shown in this pic.
  27. 1 point
    Not the gas cap but the fuel filler door. Good that you managed to find the emergency release cable. Now do yourself a huge favor and pull the plastic piece covering the hood latch and relocate the cable to just behind the front bumper tow hook plug. It fits right in there and the next time all you have to do is pop the tow hook plug and there is the cable. Now from your description of problems, I think you should take a look at the hood release actuator. It might be the source of both problems, horn beep, stuck hood latch and it not working from the lock buttons. See Part #19 here in this parts diagram. I think you should be able to hear it click while someone operates the button. If not, then it is probably faulty. Lid Front WWW.AUTOATLANTA.COM
  28. 1 point
    1. Durametric. 2. Minor body changes 2015-2016, 2016 GTS model, 2017 Macan 4 cylinder. 3. I do not think there have been many air suspension failures or faults since 2016. Air is more expensive than steel but also has many handling advantages. 4. No, transfer cases are pretty much it for large items and most of those are replaced under warranty. 5. The VIN will not tell you anything about the options without a report from a dealer (we can also get reports for our Contributing Members). Download the option codes list here: https://www.renntech.org/files/category/140-macan/
  29. 1 point
    I have had this show up my both my CGTS and GT4. Much ado about nothing as far as I can tell. I have drained oil off by loosening the filter, or just let it go. Done several track weekends with the alert notice on. Problem is not simply overfilling, but under-draining by the car, imho. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  30. 1 point
    Don't you just love these dipstick-less cars designed for millennials? On my first oil change, I over-filled it by 1.25 liters all due to the fact I did not fully understand the Oil Measurement Display. I thought the MAX level was at the top of the bar, which it isn't. The MAX level is shown in A below. Anyway, I just drained it and the level is at MAX. I also would not use a vacuum pump for the reasons mentioned.
  31. 1 point
    Hi, Would anyone have a pdf version of the 2019 .2 3 RS owner's manual to share ? Thanks. Leong
  32. 1 point
    Then a proper programming is needed.
  33. 1 point
    Please READ the Lost Radio Code FAQ and follow the procedure there to get your serial number - then post your request here.
  34. 1 point
    Mine did pretty much the same, drove it into the garage, all ok, come to drive it again, one side low! Seems they have removed what little lead content there was from them (so I was informed) and they just snap! Apparently quite a well known issue in the independents world. BMW springs do the same, had a couple fail on them.
  35. 1 point
    Welcome to RennTech Before going down the LS path, you might want to talk to one or two of the forum members that have done the LS swap; general consensus is that they would never do it again.
  36. 1 point
    After this I hope we will not see any more posts about 'I took the Panamera to the dealer to replace the cabin filter'. Makes my eyes water thinking how easy it is to do on your own. If you really have too much money, send me some (I can pm you my paypal id), and/or you can send some dough to contribute to this forum. Come on, if you can afford $250 for cabin air filter change, you can support us here. Just follow each pic from 1 to 10. All needed is your fingers, but in case you do not like using your fingers, get some soft plastic pry tool. Good luck.
  37. 1 point
    Thanks for the PN! Doesn't look very expensive, my local dealership has it for $26 and the o-ring is less than $2. I think the thermostat is on the back of the 3.2 V6 but for the 3.6 V6 the thermostat is on the side of the engine (driver side). I know this because I replaced it during my cooling system refresh at 90k miles. However, there does seem to be a housing for something back there, I'm just not sure what it is..
  38. 1 point
    Having wasted too much time determining what could be done to replace the Becker CDR23 in my 2004 Boxster 986S I have decided to provide a comprehensive document which may be helpful to others. I am currently an automotive engineer, but previously I was an audio engineer, so I understand both sides of this equation. Becker CDR23 Replacement.pdf
  39. 1 point
    Problem SOLVED. The switch is located underneath the driver's seat, just to the left of the battery box. The switch is easily accessed through the outboard most pre-cut section of carpet joined with a plastic cover (see photo). If you remove the seat and peel back the pre-cut carpet covering the battery you will have a much better view. BTW, the seat is very easy to remove. This switch has got some funky design features. The last 3 pictures should illustrate the features and the solution to my problem. Notice the channel that guides the sliding switch is in the shape of a C. I believe the FORWARD position allows the switch to be locked into what I would call Discharge Protection Manual Engagement--use this position when storing or transporting your vehicle to help prevent battery discharge. The AFT and OUT position is where the switch is located after an automatic triggering of the Discharge Protection logic (think circuit breaker tripped position). With the switch in any position between here and FWD, the Discharge Protection remains active. The AFT and IN position is visually not very distinct from the AFT and OUT position. I found it basically by accident and it is more easily determined to be in the correct position by feel rather than visually. The switch on my vehicle does not naturally "like" to go into that position, it takes a little finagling. Verify it's in the correct position by turning the ignition ON and observing the lack of Discharge Protection caution message/yellow battery indication on the MFD. I suppose this switch tripped because my old battery was weak and/or during the replacement due to low voltage from my jump start pack. Confounding the problem is the switch design--in the darkness of an underseat switch you might think that it just moves forward and aft. You might also not perceive the approximately 1mm difference in position from normal to tripped. Also a switch label and/or a mention in the manual wouldn't hurt!
  40. 1 point
    B6 is in working order. I also checked B1 (convertible top unit control) even though I am a non-convertible. All of the fuses seem to be in working order. Is there anyway to reset the window control module?
  41. 1 point
    Normal. Flat 6 design. A puff of smoke, on cold start-up, that quickly clears, is n o r m a l.
  42. 1 point
    Removing and installing rear center panel 1.Removing rear roof trim panel. Grasp underneath the roof trim panel 1 at the side and, pulling in direction of arrow, carefully remove it from the cable clamps 2. 2. Remove sound absorbent film.3. Unscrew fastening nut 1 and remove seal 2. 4. Extend rear spoiler manually. Unscrew fastening screws 1 and remove rear centre panel 2 upwards until the electric plug connection can be released. 5. Insert a screwdriver from the side and release the locking tab Arrow A and pull off the connector. Removing auxiliary brake light in rear center panel1. Raise rear center panel away from the vehicle, release the electric connector using a small screwdriver A and unplug it.2. Turn the rear center panel over and set it down on a suitable protective base. 3. The auxiliary brake light is clipped into the rear center panel six times in total. Starting from the outside, put your finger through the openings in the rear center panel and release the clips from behind A. At the same time, release the clips from the front using the screwdriver B and pull the ends of the auxiliary brake light carefully out of the rear center panel. 4. Push the two locking mechanisms for the auxiliary brake light (center) together with a screwdriver and pull the brake light out of the rear center panel. Installation is the reverse.
  43. 1 point
    Well, we had another round of rain of biblical proportions last night (inches in an hour sort of rain..) so this AM I checked the P!G. I found the floor wet again. Not as wet as prior wetness, but for sure wet. I pried up the carpet and the foam was again wet, but it appeared my drain had worked, the wet wasn't up as high, and not as much got wet. Spent some quality time with towels wringing out the foam and drying it off again. So - it appears that heavy rain causes the leak (and perhaps the HVAC contributed..) So I started tearing things apart looking for the source. I first popped off the fuse cover and the trim next to it on the starboard side, to find: Hmm.. drips. Then I looked further and saw: More drips. They're appearing from behind the A-pillar trim piece (at the top of the photo..) The drips appeared to be travelling down the inside surface of the A-pillar inside trim. The path followed down past the fuse box and behind the right side kickpanel under the dash, right into the foam backing of the carpeting. I decided to look further upstream. To do so - I had to remove the A-pillar trim. This is actually rather easy. I had already popped off the little trim piece near the fuse box cover, and I went looking for what holds the A-pillar trim in place. Found it - one long T25 screw under the "AIRBAG" logo on the trim: After removing this screw, you can easily pull the trim out from the top down - pull it toward the center of the windshield to release some stab-clips on the back, and it then slides up and out from next to the dash. Quite easy actually (and a good time to tidy up any wiring that had been tucked behind it.) There is a side-curtain airbag there, so use a bit of caution (don't jam screwdrivers willy-nilly in behind it.) This is what's found once that trim is removed: You can see the path the drain hose takes. It's quite well protected, and there was no sign of leakage on the outside of the hose, so I suspected that up higher in the hose wasn't a problem (but decided to look anyway.) I next took the trim piece off the sunvisor mounting and two T20 screws behind it, which allows pulling the headliner corner down a bit. The actual mount stays attached to the headliner and no wiring has to be disconnected. If I could have figured out how to remove the passenger assist handle in the roof I could have pulled the headliner down even further, but as was, it came down far enough that with a Maglite LED flashlight I could see the hose all the way into the drain fitting for the sunroof drain: All looked good on the drain hose. No tears, no sign of wetness. I went up top, opening the sunroof and looking around, and found there was leaf-munge in the drain area and on the tracks of the sunroof mechanism. I used my high-pressure air-gun to clean the crap out (after using my fingers to get the big stuff out - and there was some crap blocking the drain.) It turns out, if the drain is plugged and enough water gets into the area (I did an experiment with a pitcher of water), it will overflow around the edge of the sunroof, and the headliner happily routes it right down the A pillar trim with the plastic backing of the trim keeping it flowing nicely down past the fusebox and out eventually to soak the floor. Lesson - clean sunroof drains. I blew them out, then checked again with a pitcher of water, and the water happily ran out the bottom of the truck, and none appeared along the drain line, or dribbling down the headliner. Here is the rough location of the drain as seen from up top. It's actually almost (not quite, but almost, you'll need a good Maglite to see it) impossible to see due to the wind-dam popup in the sunroof housing. While I was in the area, I cleaned up the fuzzy edge of the sunroof gasket (it had hardened munge on it) and where it meets the body (which also had hardened munge on it) in the hope that the gasket seals better. I'm awaiting the next rainstorm (doesn't look like it will be a real long wait - probably tomorrow) to see if this actually helped anything. Thanks to RFM for suggesting I check the sunroof drain. Biggest trick is getting so you can see it.
  44. 1 point
    I did the oil change yesterday and it went perfectly. I thought I'd provide the information in this post that I consolidated from this and other forums for any others who are interested. Pics attached. Thanks to all those who provided this information. 1. I changed the oil with a warm engine so that the oil would drain more easily. 2. I didn't unscrew the cap on the filler neck until midway through the draining process so that the oil wouldn't come out too quickly. 3. Unscrew the drain plug using an 8mm hex bit and let drain into a collecting basin. Next time I'll also place a tarp on the floor to catch any splatter that comes from the collecting basin. 4. While the oil was still dribbling, I loosened the oil filter housing using the special tool Oil Filter Spanner 92040. 5. While waiting for the oil filter element to completely drain, I removed the old O-ring from the oil filter housing. I used a flat head screw driver to get under it and to pry it off. Ensure not to scratch/damage the oil filter housing. The O-ring comes off very easily. 6. I then cleaned the oil filter housing, and placed a new O-ring on the oil filter housing. In the latter regard, I dipped the O-ring in some of the oil that was still inside the housing, distributed it all over the O-ring, and then gently rolled the O-ring over the housing until it rolled into place. Rolling it on evenly ensures that it doesn't get twisted, which would hamper making a good seal. 7. I then removed the old oil filter and cut it open to inspect it for metal fragments. Apparently small pepper sized metal fragments are okay, but cracked pepper sized fragments are a sign of potential problems. Mine looked great, with only a few little metal fragments in the entire filter. 8. Then I replaced the drain plug. I changed from the original to a magnetic one from LN Engineering (via Pelican Parts). It uses a 10mm hex. When putting the new aluminum sealing ring on the drain plug, ensure the smooth side is toward the engine block and the sharp edged side is toward the plug. I turned it counter clockwise until if felt it seat, then turned it clockwise by hand to ensure no cross-threading. Then use a torque wrench to tighten to 37 ftlb torque. 9. Then I inserted a new filter element. Place a little pressure on it and it pops right in place. 10. I prefilled the oil filter housing to somewhere between 1/3 and just under 1/2 full. Then screw it on by hand and finish with a torque wrench tightening to 19 ftlb torque (my 1/4" torque wrench only goes to 200 inlb which is a bit less than 19 ftlb--228inlb, and my 1/2" starts at 20ftlb; so I put it on with the 1/4 at 200 inlb and then checked with the 1/4" at 20 ftlb and got the click right away, so it should be about right). 11. I then began filling oil, having placed some paper towel to catch some drips under the filler neck. I put in the rest of the container that I started for the oil filter housing, as well as 7 more litres (i.e., 8 litres). 12. Check oil level. It gave an overfull indication, which apparently is normal. I started the car and let it run for about 15 seconds (Despite having prefilled the oil filter housing, I did get a low pressure warning that lasted only a second). Then started the check oil procedure again. This time it takes about 30 minutes. It tested one segment short (sorry for the poor pic but you'll get the idea). One segment corresponds to 0.4 litres, so I put in 400ml more, checked again with ignition only, and the oil level was perfect. So, the total oil used was 8.4 litres. 13. Then start the motor again and let run for a few minutes. Check for leaks. 14. Take it for a spin, and check for leaks.
  45. 1 point
    P0171 Oxygen Sensing Adaptation, Idle Range, Bank 1 – Above Limit P0174 Oxygen Sensing Adaptation, Idle Range, Bank 2 – Above Limit Possible fault causes: - Incorrect signal from MAF sensor - Intake air system leaking - Fuel pressure too low - Volume supply of fuel pump too low - Fuel injectors fouled - PCV valve leaks - Cap of oil filler neck not closed correctly or seal is damaged Looks like you have a leak...
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    I am in Morgan Hill (a little South of San Jose) and I can turn it on for you. Or... if you are not in a hurry I will be in Roseville June 16. Drop me a PM if you are interested in either.
  48. 1 point
    9) Remove the xenon ballast in the bi-xenon headlights (6 bolts) then disconect the harness, now remove the 5 pins (thin black, thin brown, red, yellow and uncovered ground wire) you only need two wires to turn on the xenon (Strong black and Strong brown) 10) Cut all the wires in the connector (bi-xenon headlight) NEAR to the connector and then use the plastic trick to remove it from the headlight. Take the Halogen connector and use this diagram: PIN 1 - Parking Light Lead (+) PIN 2 - High Beam Adjuster Supply PIN 3 - High Beam Adjuster Sensor PIN 4 - High Beam Adjuster Ground PIN 5 - EMPTY PIN 6 - Low Beam Lead (+) PIN 7 - High Beam Lead (+) PIN 8 - Additional High Beam Ground (-) PIN 9 - Turn Signal Lead (+) PIN 10 - Low Beam Ground/Parking light/Turn Signal (-) PIN 11 - EMPTY PIN 12 - EMPTY (tanks to toby http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php?s...pic=1189&st=20) 11) Tap every wire as this diagram says, note that inside the headlights (Halogen / bi-xenon) the grounds wires are brown and leads black 12) if you want to, remove this resistor from the bi-xenon shuttle 13) Remember to tap the bi-xenon shuttle + Auxiliary high beam whit the pins PIN 7 - High Beam Lead (+) PIN 8 - Additional High Beam Ground (-) Corner light + xenon ballast whit PIN 6 - Low Beam Lead (+) PIN 10 - Low Beam Ground/Parking light/Turn Signal (-) 14) Check all the wires, solde and insulate all wires. 15 reinstall the xenon ballast, connectors and you are done!
  49. 1 point
    Possible cause of fault: • Pin 86 S is not detected when terminal 15 is switched on • Fuse E1 faulty • Short circuit to ground/open circuit in wiring between the alarm system control module and the ignition lock • Ignition lock faulty
  50. 1 point
    Integrated Garage Door Opener DIY I got tired of forgetting to remove the garage door opener at Concours and getting points taken off, so I decided to integrate it into the center console. I got my inspiration from Kirby's Garage Door Opener DIY and added a few twists. I took the existing garage door opener from Genie and opened it up to use just the circuit board. This particular circuit board had lots of extra unused traces and holes that went back to were the switch was (probably for different enclosures), so I just picked 2 and ran about 5 feet of wire from each one. Then I put a little cap over the switch to prevent it from being pushed and wrapped the whole board in electrical tape. I wanted to put the circuit board transmitter as high in the car as possible to get the maximum sending range. I settled on putting the transmitter at the top of the drivers side A pillar, secured with some velcro. There is plenty of space under interior A pillar cover which goes over the transmitter with no problems. The 2 wires are run down the A pillar in the wire conduit that is there, and along the bottom of the drivers side of the dash to the center console. This arrangement gives me a 1.5 block range on the transmitter, which is further than I can see the house. The only downside to this arrangement is that you have to take off the A pillar cover to change the remote control battery. But this only need to be done every other year or more, so I don't think it is an issue. The parts that I used for the switch and its placement are from a 996 Targa. The batwing is called a Sole Switch Trim, P/N 996-552-335-01-01C and lists for $12.69. The Switch is called a Tip Switch, P/N 996-613-119-10-A05 and lists for 23.56. This switch is used to control the sunshade on the Targa. The plug blank is one I had laying around is probably under $5.00. Wiring the actual switch is pretty straight forward. There are 5 spades on the switch, 3 are used for the Garage Door Opener, and 2 are for the switch icon lighting. The 2 outboard vertical spades are for the lighting of the switch icon. Looking at the switch from the front, the spade on the left is the + lead, and the right spade is the - lead. I took lighting power from the seat heater switch lights. On those switches connector the brown wire is -, and the blue/red wire is +. The blue red wire is pigtailed between the 2 connectors, so that is the giveaway on it. I used inline cable splicers to connect the new leads. Back to the garage door switch, the center 3 spades are what are used for the wiring back to the remote control circuit board. The bottom horizontal spade is for one wire connection, and the 2 vertical spades above it are ganged together for the other wire connection. This way you can push the switch in either direction and the garage door remote will activate. So there you have it, another nice way to integrate your garage door opener into your 996. :) ONE LAST THING: Be sure to put in a fresh battery before you button up you work. A fresh battery can last 3-5 years under normal use! Otherwise, you may be opening up things much earlier to replace the battery.
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