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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/20/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    The horn beeps and lights flashing is the alarm system telling you there is a alarm system zone fault somewhere. Could be an open (or maybe in this case closed/locked when it should be open) zone. Zones are: drivers/passenger doors, trunk lid, engine lid, glass (targa) top, gas cap lid, center console lid, and if you have it the glove box door. There are also two interior sensors in the overhead that detect motion when the car is locked. I think getting to the battery and disconnecting is a good idea. However, you have a problem since the trunk is not opening. First thing to try is actually seeing if the trunk is already open. Put your fingers under the trunk lid and try pulling up. Second is to locate the emergency release cable under the passenger side headlight. Unfortunately you need to pop the headlight out to make this a simple exercise, and you can't do that without opening the trunk. So you have to pull the passenger wheel well liner and fish out the cable from behind. Hopefully your wheel lock socket is not in your trunk!
  2. 1 point
  3. 1 point
  4. 1 point
    I received a call from Jake and he said they started assembly work on the motor this week. Right on schedule with the dates he gave me back in August. Pictures coming soon.
  5. 1 point
  6. 1 point
    Get the CEL code again and post. Before you proceed, either DIY or shop, we can help you narrow this down. I certainly would want to know specifically and exactly that this is the problem before chasing ghosts and replacing parts. Also, what year and model? Other recent maintenance or problems? There are other valves and components in the evap system to consider. See here Carbon Canister WWW.AUTOATLANTA.COM
  7. 1 point
    Hi Toby, I used this as a general guide, it should be very similar to any valved exhaust you plan on installing. Hope it helps! I hope they don't mind installation links here - Akrapovic Install
  8. 1 point
    Noted! Mechanical pressure gauge ordered. Will update when I have actual oil pressure values.
  9. 1 point
    Yes, we are talking about the front diff, as it sits under the fuel tank.. How hard is obviously related to how well you are equipped and your mechanical expertise.
  10. 1 point
    I would put a mechanical pressure gauge on it before doing anything else; you need to know what the actual pressure is before doing anything else.
  11. 1 point
  12. 1 point
    999 631 147 90 - Bulb 3W 996 731 531 01 01C - Mirror glass with frame (satin black)
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
    I just completed a similar job. I used a ball joint separator to press the studs out. All 6 studs out in less than 10 minutes!
  15. 1 point
  16. 1 point
    1999 C2 Manual Bought last October with ~114k No maintenance history, original IMS. Going through and doing maintenance now and am sitting at 115k miles. Runs like a top with minimal oil seapage from sump plate. Debating if I should go full retard and Upgrade IMS along with other bits or see what my luck brings with the original 2 row IMS
  17. 1 point
  18. 1 point
    Sounds good! Parts are on the way. Will also replace the oil pressure sender, since it´s cheap and apparently tend to fail over time, as I can read. As I can see, the easiest way to access the oil pressure sender is from the top - with the engine top cover removed. Is that correct?
  19. 1 point
    The 2 rear tires should be the same size and manufacture model as the 2 front new tires. Workshop mode, ask them to check the voltage on the TPMS, balancing, and all 4 tire wheel alignment.
  20. 1 point
    I am not 100% certain, but if you take off the plastic trim cover covering the hood latch, you should be able to see everything. You pull the interior cover back a bit to reach the bolts that hold the hood latch to the frame. It is all pretty straight forward from there.
  21. 1 point
    That's the vent line from the oil/coolant heat exchanger #30 here.
  22. 1 point
    The hoses 1 and 3 are the supply and return lines for the front radiators. They are located on the back side of the engine near the transmission. They connect to the metal supply and return lines that run up the center transmission tunnel and go to the front radiators. You probably have to remove the underbelly pans to see them. Those hoses attach to #9 and #10 here M96.01/02/03 Water Cooling 2 M96.04 WWW.AUTOATLANTA.COM
  23. 1 point
    Not the gas cap but the fuel filler door. Good that you managed to find the emergency release cable. Now do yourself a huge favor and pull the plastic piece covering the hood latch and relocate the cable to just behind the front bumper tow hook plug. It fits right in there and the next time all you have to do is pop the tow hook plug and there is the cable. Now from your description of problems, I think you should take a look at the hood release actuator. It might be the source of both problems, horn beep, stuck hood latch and it not working from the lock buttons. See Part #19 here in this parts diagram. I think you should be able to hear it click while someone operates the button. If not, then it is probably faulty. Lid Front WWW.AUTOATLANTA.COM
  24. 1 point
    1. Durametric. 2. Minor body changes 2015-2016, 2016 GTS model, 2017 Macan 4 cylinder. 3. I do not think there have been many air suspension failures or faults since 2016. Air is more expensive than steel but also has many handling advantages. 4. No, transfer cases are pretty much it for large items and most of those are replaced under warranty. 5. The VIN will not tell you anything about the options without a report from a dealer (we can also get reports for our Contributing Members). Download the option codes list here: https://www.renntech.org/files/category/140-macan/
  25. 1 point
    Thought i'd record what i found for posterity. The issue was the driver's side (UK) door handle micro switch. I stripped the door down enough to view the window motor spindle. I could see that it was only (intermittently) driving in one direction. Thus i guessed there was a logic issue. I started exercising the door handle microswitches then i noted that I was able to get the motor to drive in both directions. Re-assembled the door and the window is fine now. I guess that the circuit 'thought' that the window was already fully up and would not allow the motor to drive in that direction. Hope this helps someone.
  26. 1 point
    Hi, Would anyone have a pdf version of the 2019 .2 3 RS owner's manual to share ? Thanks. Leong
  27. 1 point
    If the car starts okay then that party of the coding was done. As I recall programming the door locks is separate as well as the rear hatch.
  28. 1 point
    The car has to be programmed to the Kessy fob (not the other way around). You must have the car's security codes and use a Porsche PIWIS tester. There is no other way that I am aware of. You need to find a shop with a Porsche PIWIS tester and then you as the legal car owner needs to go a Porsche dealer and request your security codes - you may be required to show proof of ownership.
  29. 1 point
    Updated Mileage: 288,565. 2018 Round trips included NY to Seattle and NY to New Orleans. Still not driving as much as I'd like. #4 cylinder down to 75%. Trying to hold out to 300k before rebuild.
  30. 1 point
    Sorry to be bringing up an old thread but just looking for some clarification on this one and trying to understand the nomenclature. Seeing that the deviation of bank one is off by 12 degrees Crk , but the actual angle read at idle is 1.1 degrees. Would it be fair to say the engine is working "full on " to adapt this car to try and maintain the 1.1 at idle and 25.94 at 2K ? just helping a friend with P1397 problem so got me interested in the whole theory of operation. The car we are working on is a 99 996 so has DME 5.2.2 . we can see deviation but 5.2.2 does not show actual ( unless I just cant see it ) which is a bit disappointing. I wanted to see if it jumps to 25 when actuating variocam but without seeing actual we wont know. Thanks
  31. 1 point
    EDIT: Additional info added at bottom of tutorial, refers to recently found info, clarifying how many different fluids are needed for the 970 generation of Panamera PDK (at end of tutorial). Attached is a DIY for changing fluid on Panamera PDK transmission. Got this from a fellow forum member who happened to do the change. This should help many interested in doing maintenance on Panamera without paying thousands for it. Speaking to shop/dealer, after 60k, filter/pan replacement not absolutely necessary (cost of the kit is about $350). So for 60k, drain and refill fluid is fine. At 120k, you would do same fluid change, but this time replace the pan/filter as well. Read the entire DIY before you start to get a good idea of requirements and estimate time involvement for you to complete. Do not forget to replace the drain plug with its built in seal. Last thing you need is have a $15 part cause small leaking, and then have to put car up, open up drain plug, lose a bunch of expensive oil, just to put new drain plug in. So dont cut on this one part. You can get the Pentosine FFL3 PDK fluid directly from Porsche, or from Pentosine resellers. Porsche will charge you triple the price for identical fluid. You choose. Everything you need is mentioned in the DIY. Since Durametric does not have capability to monitor PDK temperature yet, you can use an IR thermometer, when you heat up the PDK to 40 celsius, after you put in 6-8 quarts or so, and when doing final level check. Good luck. 970 generation Panamera PDK transmission info: ZF is manufacturer of PDK transmission for Porsche They make 2 PDK transmissions One for mid & rear engine applications (911, boxter, etc) Another one specifically made for the Panamera Panamera PDK servicing requires two (2) fluids only (as compared to 3 fluids in other PDK car models at Porsche FFL3 fluid - Gearbox & clutches - need about 9 quarts Shell TF0951 - Front final drive - need about 0.4 quarts Here is the info dug up from ZF on this topic: "In fact, two separate DCT ranges or 'platforms' have been developed by ZF, both fitted with wet clutches, for use in Porsche's various longitudinal applications. The first is for use in the mid- and rear-engine sports cars (the 911, the Cayman and the Boxster), while a completely different platform has been developed for use in the larger Panamera. For each platform, two different torque options are available, with the 500N.m versions using an 'ND2015' clutch pack, and the 780N.m versions using an 'ND2216' clutch pack, both supplied by ZF Sachs....... In terms of the oil circuit itself, two completely different approaches have been employed for the two platforms. Non Panamera models: The 7DT45 and 7DT70 have two oil circuits, and hence two different oils; the first is Pentosin FFL-3 for the clutch and hydraulics, and the second is ExxonMobil Mobilube PTX 75W-90 for the gear-set and bevel gear. The oil levels have been kept as low as possible, to reduce churning losses for those moving parts that are immersed in oil. Panamera: Conversely, the 7DT75 has a single oil circuit and a dry sump (to minimize churning losses), with an 'active lubrication system' to feed oil to each gear-set and clutch. This version uses only the Pentosin FFL-3 lubricant, which was developed exclusively for the ZF DCTs. One of the main reasons for using a single oil circuit is that clutch cooling is required at both ends of the transmission, for the main dual-clutch module and for the hang-on clutch used in the four-wheel-drive variant. This would have presented significant sealing complications had multiple circuits been chosen." Bottom line: What this means is that the Panamera PDK uses transmission design which uses one fluid compartment for the gearbox and the clutches, and another separate compartment for the final drive. Two fluids total.
  32. 1 point
    After this I hope we will not see any more posts about 'I took the Panamera to the dealer to replace the cabin filter'. Makes my eyes water thinking how easy it is to do on your own. If you really have too much money, send me some (I can pm you my paypal id), and/or you can send some dough to contribute to this forum. Come on, if you can afford $250 for cabin air filter change, you can support us here. Just follow each pic from 1 to 10. All needed is your fingers, but in case you do not like using your fingers, get some soft plastic pry tool. Good luck.
  33. 1 point
    I just resolved a window issue on my 2007 Porsche Cayman and wanted to post and help out anyone with a similar issue. My passenger side window was functioning normally except for when I closed my door the automatic window drop to clear the door seal was not returning to the complete up position and was staying down. The automatic up feature on the window was also not working. The auto-down feature worked and all other functions of the window performed normally. So to be clear, when you pulled the exterior and interior door handles the widow dropped the 10mm or 1/4 inch it should. However, upon shutting the doot the window would stay down in this position and not return up. So.... I decided to do some research and came across the "latch micro switch issue".. I figured hey part isn't that expense so I replace the latch and the issue remained. After much more research, I came across a post about that issue being caused from a faulty door motor ECU. This IS the reason for the issue. After, disconnecting the battery, taking off the door panel using numerous videos and instructions from this site and others I was able to quickly replace the motor unit with a new one that I got on ebay for $120. The motor is easy to remove, 3 screws and then just pull the motor straight out and it will disconnect from the window regulator. Next, pop in the new one and you are good to go. Finally, the issue was resolved upon reconnecting the car battery and the motor auto cycled up and down and is now functioning normally. I wanted to post this as I am hoping someone else who does a google search for a similar issue will find this and save them hundreds if not a thousand dollars from taking the car to a Porsche dealer. The part number for the motor that I used to replace the current window motor was 997.624.182.06 replacing the original part that was 997.624.182.03
  34. 1 point
    Welcome to RennTech The foam coming out the vents are the seals from the heater box diverter door seals which have dried out and are starting to fall apart. To fully repair this, you need to disconnect and drop the heater box down (it is in the passenger's side under the dash), scrape off all the old seals and replace them. Some people have simply removed them, but that allows some mixing of different air streams in the system. Do a search on the topic, it has been written up on a couple of websites.
  35. 1 point
    Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. (Special thanks to Chuck Jones for being the guinea pig and for taking the photos.) Parts you will need: 997.624.113.00 Actuator Tools you will need: Very short Torx T20 driver and right angle ratchet or tool to use the short T20 in a very confined space Regular screwdriver, phillips screw driver, and 10 mm wrench to remove th wheel well liner 1. Jack the car so that right front wheel is off the ground and secure it with a jack stand. Remove the right front wheel. 2. Remove the wheel well liner by removing the the plastics rivets (pry them out with a regular screwdriver). As well remove the 10 mm nuts on each side of the axle. Now remove the phillips screws that fasten the wheel well liner under the front bumper and remove the wheel well liner (and set aside). 3. Locate the EVAP canister and remove the electrical connection at the top of the canister. Now remove the 10 mm nut that holds the canister in place. Remove gas the vapor lines - one at the top and one at the bottom (again by squeezing the connectors). Remove the EVAP canister by pulling gently back and forth until it releases from the rubber gromments 4. Look back up under the fender (now that the canister is out of the way) and locate the broken actuator. Now using the stubby Torx T-20 loose (but do not remove) the two T-20 screws. The actuator itself is a bit tough to get to and you will need a really short T-20 Torx head to loosen the two screws. I say loosen because that is all you need to do to remove the part - it sits in two "U" shaped slots. Remove the electrical connector (by squeezing the tab). Here is a pic of the new part - as you see the Torx screws are already in place so that is all you have to do to replace it. 5. Put the new part in place making sure you feed the emergency pull line through the fender to its location in the door jam. There is room to slide it through the side so you don't need to try and thread it through the hole. Fasten the two Torx screws and reconnect the electrical connector. Chuck's car had the guide rose guide piece missing (so he needed to order one) Here is a pic of his car (without guide rose) and my car (with guide rose). Ref. P/N 997.624.505.00 We also noticed that on his car the plastic catch for the lock was missing (so he needed to order that too). Here is a pic of his car (without cap) and my car (with cap). Ref. P/N 996.201.243.00 6. Reinstall the EVAP canister by pushing it into place on the rubber gromments. Then reattach the vapor lines (they should snap back into place) and the electrical connection. Finally put the 10 mm nut back in place and tighten down. 7. Reinstall the wheel well liner (reverse of removal). 8. Mount the tire, lower the car and re-torque the wheel bolts. Done.
  36. 1 point
    I just started replacing my valve cover gaskets and have one done already. I know your post is from 2 years ago but I would like to thank you. The pictures you posted of the cut down torx bit and the A/C plug were instrumental in me keeping my sanity during this project.
  37. 1 point
    Just want to add to this topic to help those who are struggling to put the gear shifter back on. The secret to making sure the button will work it to shake the gear shifter. Hear that rattle? We've got to stop that. Here's how: 1) Hold the shifter horizontal so the button is facing the floor. 2) Insert a small watchmaker's screwdriver up between the edge of the button and the leather of the shifter on the same horizontal plane as the shifter 3) With the screwdriver in place, give the shifter a shake. If you don't hear a rattle it means you have correctly trapped the mechanism within the shifter in the right place. 4) With the screwdriver still in place push the shifter back into position in the car. making sure the car is in 'D' 5) There should be a satisfying click when the shifter is in place. When you hear this, remove the screwdriver and you will have a working button. Hope this helps
  38. 1 point
    This is for my '05 V6, you got to take off the front bumper cover and wheel lining for the side you're working on. Hope this helps
  39. 1 point
    I had what I thought was a simular problem and I noticed that cleaning the radiators kept it closer to the "8" than before. They are in a bad spot as far as collecting leaves and debris between them and the condensers.
  40. 1 point
    Hi everyone. A couple of days ago, the PSM & ABS warning lights lit up on my 2001 Carrera. A quick search on this Forum suggested a faulty brake pedal switch. Checked my brake lights and sure enough, no lights so a faulty switch is definitely indicated. After about 30 minutes of twisting my body under the dash, managed to get it out. Sure enough, the switch has an open circuit. Bought a new switch and plugged it into the harness. Tested the plunger on the switch to see if the brakes lights work - but they did not. However, no PSM/ABS lights showing which is an improvement. Seemed odd to me but I have seen stranger on this car so I press ahead. Another 30 minutes of twisting my body under the dash and finally re-installed the new switch under the pedal. But now the PSM/ABS lights turn on again and still no brake lights! Back to square one! Removed the switch (now it takes me only 5 minutes to twist my body under the dash) and check it out. Checks out perfectly. And NO PSM/ABS lights with the switch plugged in but not installed under the pedal. Hmmmm. Check fuses and all the usual stuff. Everything fine. Thought about the brake light bulbs but what are chances of all 3 brake lights burned out all at once??? Surely at least one of them should be working so I can at least tell whether the brake light circuits are OK. Seriously considering taking the car to the dealer. Reinstall the switch under the pedal (I can now do that in less than 30 seconds of twisting). Check the driver side brake light bulb. It's burned out! Check the passenger side bulb. That is also burned out. Check the centre brake light - that one is OK. So why don't I at least have a centre brake light when I press the brake pedal??? Replace the driver side bulb. But still no brake lights anywhere! Remove the new bulb and check it out. Nothing wrong with it. So I replace the passenger side bulb and suddenly everything works fine, including the centre brake light! And no ABS/PSM lights! Everything fine!!! Question. Are the circuits really designed so that if one brake bulb fails, none of the others will work? Doesn't make sense to me. Lesson 1. Do the simple things first, eg. replace ALL bad bulbs before testing. Though I still don't understand why one dead bulb suppresses the other two brake lights AND turns on the ABS/PSM warning lights. Or perhaps this was just some random weird chain of events! Lesson 2. Amazing how something that originally takes 30 minutes can be done in 30 seconds with a little practice!
  41. 1 point
    So here are a couple of snaps. I have my headliner out if anyone needs a specific shot of anything just ask. At the back of the sunroof frame is a drain. It has a bit of a reservoir then the tube to the back of the car. I sat inside the car while a buddy with a hose sprayed the roof of the car. No water came in. So i moved the car onto an incline and water started to drip. (Don't park on an incline, is the only answer i can come up with) If the reservoir gets too much water then it will leak over the frame and onto your headliner. I am going to go full black alcantara for the interior of the PIG. So more pics will follow. Interestingly one of my drain tubes is blue. The others grey. Carfax was clean, so no real idea as to why this was changed. Although when it rains and rains i have water when i open up my rear drivers side door. Attached is a picture of the plastic piece where the drains hook up to. I wanted to make sure this was 100% clean so i took it out. You can see the factory sealant that was displaced when i removed it.
  42. 1 point
  43. 1 point
    Well, we had another round of rain of biblical proportions last night (inches in an hour sort of rain..) so this AM I checked the P!G. I found the floor wet again. Not as wet as prior wetness, but for sure wet. I pried up the carpet and the foam was again wet, but it appeared my drain had worked, the wet wasn't up as high, and not as much got wet. Spent some quality time with towels wringing out the foam and drying it off again. So - it appears that heavy rain causes the leak (and perhaps the HVAC contributed..) So I started tearing things apart looking for the source. I first popped off the fuse cover and the trim next to it on the starboard side, to find: Hmm.. drips. Then I looked further and saw: More drips. They're appearing from behind the A-pillar trim piece (at the top of the photo..) The drips appeared to be travelling down the inside surface of the A-pillar inside trim. The path followed down past the fuse box and behind the right side kickpanel under the dash, right into the foam backing of the carpeting. I decided to look further upstream. To do so - I had to remove the A-pillar trim. This is actually rather easy. I had already popped off the little trim piece near the fuse box cover, and I went looking for what holds the A-pillar trim in place. Found it - one long T25 screw under the "AIRBAG" logo on the trim: After removing this screw, you can easily pull the trim out from the top down - pull it toward the center of the windshield to release some stab-clips on the back, and it then slides up and out from next to the dash. Quite easy actually (and a good time to tidy up any wiring that had been tucked behind it.) There is a side-curtain airbag there, so use a bit of caution (don't jam screwdrivers willy-nilly in behind it.) This is what's found once that trim is removed: You can see the path the drain hose takes. It's quite well protected, and there was no sign of leakage on the outside of the hose, so I suspected that up higher in the hose wasn't a problem (but decided to look anyway.) I next took the trim piece off the sunvisor mounting and two T20 screws behind it, which allows pulling the headliner corner down a bit. The actual mount stays attached to the headliner and no wiring has to be disconnected. If I could have figured out how to remove the passenger assist handle in the roof I could have pulled the headliner down even further, but as was, it came down far enough that with a Maglite LED flashlight I could see the hose all the way into the drain fitting for the sunroof drain: All looked good on the drain hose. No tears, no sign of wetness. I went up top, opening the sunroof and looking around, and found there was leaf-munge in the drain area and on the tracks of the sunroof mechanism. I used my high-pressure air-gun to clean the crap out (after using my fingers to get the big stuff out - and there was some crap blocking the drain.) It turns out, if the drain is plugged and enough water gets into the area (I did an experiment with a pitcher of water), it will overflow around the edge of the sunroof, and the headliner happily routes it right down the A pillar trim with the plastic backing of the trim keeping it flowing nicely down past the fusebox and out eventually to soak the floor. Lesson - clean sunroof drains. I blew them out, then checked again with a pitcher of water, and the water happily ran out the bottom of the truck, and none appeared along the drain line, or dribbling down the headliner. Here is the rough location of the drain as seen from up top. It's actually almost (not quite, but almost, you'll need a good Maglite to see it) impossible to see due to the wind-dam popup in the sunroof housing. While I was in the area, I cleaned up the fuzzy edge of the sunroof gasket (it had hardened munge on it) and where it meets the body (which also had hardened munge on it) in the hope that the gasket seals better. I'm awaiting the next rainstorm (doesn't look like it will be a real long wait - probably tomorrow) to see if this actually helped anything. Thanks to RFM for suggesting I check the sunroof drain. Biggest trick is getting so you can see it.
  44. 1 point
    Here's a picture of the culprit. This was the original voltage regulator taken from my alternator and replaced with the part I mentioned above (that also works in various other cars like VW, Mercedes, etc). I can't say what caused what, but it turns out that my wiring harness that runs from the alternator to the starter to a junction block was also bad and was causing resistance when it heated up (I believe there's a TSB related to this). Thanks to JFP in PA who was a huge help tracking this down and told me that these two parts can sometimes go out together. I saw Logray and some others had this problem too in the past (see link below) so that was helpful too. It's been 100+ degrees F here for the last few weeks so it's not surprising that if it was going to happen, it would happen now. http://www.renntech.... guage harness Also, FYI, in response to my own question above: The "Battery / Generator" warning message and accompanying battery light on the console goes on when the computer detects that the voltage is too low. It's not something that is "tripped" and it will go off once the battery is recharged and the alternator issues are fixed, therefore keeping the battery charged. This can also happen if you leave your light on or door open in the car too long and it drains the battery. Just take it for a spirited drive to let the alternator charge the battery or hook the battery up to a charger if it gets too low to crank the starter. Thank you! :renntech:
  45. 1 point
    Removing selector knob 1. Selector lever is in position D. Note! -- The button (inset) at the front must not be pressed down when the selector knob is pulled. 2. Pull selector knob up and off. Installing selector knob Note! -- The button must not be pressed down when the selector knob is installed. 1. Selector lever is in position D. Caution! Spring in selector knob is overstretched! - Only move the selector knob as far forward until the tool can be inserted. - Avoid any further overstretching. 2. The unlocking hook in the selector knob must retract to the button grey object . Lock the hook under the button, using short screwdriver A for example. 3. Push on the selector knob until it audibly engages in the selector support. The sleeve is then inserted in the selector lever cover. 4. Remove the tool on the handle. 5. Functional test of gear selecting system: - Will the vehicle start? - Do all the selector lever positions work?
  46. 1 point
    I found out that it was the door latch and not the micro-switch that needs to be replaced. The door latch will wear out from use. Here is the link to replacing a 997 microswitch and the next link continues on to the door latch. http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php?/tutorials/article/7-door-micro-switch/ http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php?/topic/32134-door-latch/ Paul
  47. 1 point
    If you look at the picture on the prior page it was frayed exactly where the red felt pads were placed. That's were a small part was cut out by the dealer. To add to the renewed discussion, i'd been meaning to send in some pics of the fix on what the end result was that rid me of this little niggle. It was as simple as purchasing some felt tape (or equivalent) and working it around the area to reduce the friction. This is how it currently looks: - I just had to be sure that all surfaces that the strap is in contact with were sufficiently covered to prevent any contact with the plastic. Other than that and how always it's the case, a pain to discover but simple to remedy. Regards Pop OMG. This is by FAR the best thread I've read. For 2 years now i've had this very exact cracking noise and nobody (dealers) knew where it came from. It just tried your fix and it took all of 5 minutes and 2 bucks. Sound is now GONE. Pop. i think i love you. LOL
  48. 1 point
  49. 1 point
    Many thanks to all that have guided me on my quest to understand and then accomplish tasks that before this forum and it's members I would not have even contemplated. And it's FUN plus my wife likes it because I'm saving some money doing routine service myself. That being said I am now going to try my first DIY Post on a little fun project I did in approx 2 hours and boy did it turn out well. I got the idea when I was admiring a fellow co-workers Carrera with the shiny enameled center wheel covers. Upon doing some research I discovered they are expensive and often times stolen. We have a family owned 1998 986 that is STOCK BASIC and it needed a bit of color as it's the classic Arctic Silver Met with a black top and interior. The only other color on the car is the hood crest. So being an avid modeler in my youth and also today went into my hobby man cave and discovered that I had on hand all the necessary items needed to spruce up my basic black and silver wheel centers. Here are the steps and the items you'll need to complete this easy fixer upper. 1. Find a local hobby store or online and buy the following: Tamiya Acrylic paint in the following colors, Semi Gloss Black, Red, Gold and you'll also need some thinner I just use the Tamiya thinner. YOU MUST USE ACRYLIC as it holds it's color and after being shot with 3 coats of clear will last a long time! 1 Can of Dupli-Color High Performance Wheel CLEAR Pep-Boys 1 Set of hobby brushes small tipped (tight spaces on the wheel centers) 2. Approx. 2 hours of your time and bit of a steady hand but dont worry with a paper towel, thinner and a toothpick you can correct your errors if you cant stay inside the lines. :) Cost under $25.00 3. CLEAN CLEAN CLEAN the wheel centers a good dish soap or degreaser is best DRY COMPLETELY. 4. Start with the hard color 1st GOLD dont be put off it takes 2 coats and gold hobby paint is the worst color to apply just be patient after 1 coat dries apply the second and you'll see what I mean. Next do the RED. Then finally the BLACK. Set aside to dry for about 1/2 hour (have a Stella) then get out your clear coat and LIGHTLY apply 1 then 2 then 3 coats make sure you allow about 20 min for the clear to dry between coats. The wheel centers have recessed portions for each color so it's easy to paint dip the color into the spot where it belongs. TAA DAA your done and here are the results along with the products I used. Guess what my fellow co-worker thinks they look great! Take all look at the pics and you'll see the products and the results. Have fun!
  50. 1 point
    Are you sure you are holding the trunk lock release button down long enough. It takes about 2-3 seconds to work. I know I made the mistake of thinking it was like the buttons for all my other cars until someone pointed out to me the difference by design. It ios mentioned in the Owner's Manual but is easy to overlook.
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