Jump to content

Server Lease Renewal/Software Licenses

Our yearly server lease, software licenses, as well as hardware operating costs, ARE due Dec 6th, 2021. Our current donations have fallen far short of the funds we need to renew. Please remember the RennTech.org community is Member supported so please consider a donation to help...  THANK YOU!

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/12/2020 in all areas

  1. Becker radio sticky knob fix. I actually performed this fix on my radio knobs about 3 months ago, but did not want to post anything until I know it is capable of surviving the 90+ heat wave we get here in DC. Well the fix helded up with not degradation in the appearance, texture, and feel so here is what I did. (sorry no pics of the painting) 1. Remove knobs from the radio by pulling the knobs straight out 2. If the knob have been textured from prior attempts to clean the gummy dissolved rubber off the knobs, gently rub/press/massage the knob to remove/smooth as much of the textured knob. Slight imperfections are ok. 3. Run to your local home center and purchase some 400 grit sand paper a can of Black Rust-oleum Rust Stop Gloss Protective Enamel spray paint. DO NOT GET THE SEMI GLOSS OR FLAT PAINT. The non-gloss paints made the knob gummier and did not dry after 3 days!!! 4. Place the knobs flat on the back side down in a shallow box about 12x12 and spray 10 light coat of paint over the whole knob. Allowing the knob to dry at least 2 hours between coats 5. After the 10th coat, let knob dry at least 24 hours 6. Gently sand the knob to smoothen out the slight imperfections 7. Place knob back in the box and apply another 10 coats of paint (20 coats total) 8. After the 20 coat, let the knob dry thoroughly. In 90 degree dry heat, it was completely dry in about 18 hours 9. Now with the 400 grit sand paper, GENTLY sand the knob so that the glossy finish is dull 10. Now here comes the fun, buff the knob on your tshirt to bring a little of the dull shine to life. 11. Reinstall knobs on the radio. 12. My knobs are near 100% match to the radio color and is no longer gummy or soft to the touch I have tried the plastic dip and spray methods and both left the knob with a cheap look and feel and the coating actually peeled off. This method when properly cured, produced a hard knob with out having to clean or remove the gummy stuff.
    1 point
  2. I had heard this urban legend that you can repair door dings and dents by rubbing dry ice over the dent and then heating it with a hair dryer or heat gun. It seemed simple enough, so I decided to try it on the wife's urban assault vehicle which has its fair share of door dings. I went over to our neighborhood grocery store and got 2 pounds of dry ice for $3. Here is the what the test door looked like before the test. Essentially the process is to take some dry ice (while wearing gloves, as it is very, very cold), and simply run the dry ice back and forth over the dent until the metal has cooled to the temperature of dry ice. This shrinks the sheet metal, and pulls in the dent. Next blow hot air onto the dented area using a hair drier or a heat gun making sure that you don't heat the sheet metal to over 195 ~ 200 degrees as you can damage the paint by heating any more than that. This will expand the metal and further smooth the dent. After you have the sheet metal hot, then run the dry ice over the dent again until the metal is cooled to the temperature of the dry ice again. It takes about 3-6 times of this hot-cold-hot-cold routine to get complete results, but you will start to see the dent go away after the 1st cycle. Repeat this process until the dent is gone to your satisfaction. Your end result should look like this: This trick works even better with aluminum panels, does not scratch, discolor or harm the paint because the face of the dry ice on the sheet metal has a thin layer of Carbon Dioxide gas that is boiling off from the frozen dry ice. I next tried this technique on the 996 with a small ding on the left rear quarter panel, and it worked perfectly. So $3 worth of dry ice and about 30 minutes saved me several hundred dollars for a paintless dent repair guy to do essentially the same job.
    1 point
  3. The cooler for a Boxster tip is on the transmission. On a 996 tip it is in the front. Your profile says you have a Boxster S. So you would use a 996 tip cover because you have a third coolant radiator in the front.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.