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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/06/2019 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    A couple of days ago my head unit started cycling off and on every minute or so. I found some posts that these things are notorious for failing so I started looking for a place that would repair it. Luckily I found the Becker office in Saddle Brook NJ, called them, and they emailed me instructions how to fix it. Apparently my XM SAT provider caused the problem. It required a reboot as per below: WARNING It was brought to our attention, that the PCM 3.0 and 3.1 units have been rebooting continuously on a number of Porsche vehicles at the moment. It seems that a signal was sent by SiriusXM which has caused this issue. SiriusXM and Porsche are investigating currently and are working on a fix. VERY Important: Please DO NOT replace any parts or hardware on a vehicle, due to this issue. In order to rectify this issue, you will perform a “PCM handover” (also known as a PCM Hard Reset). Instructions are listed below; Press and hold the PCM>>Info button for approximately 10 seconds until the PCM reboots. Immediately select the following from the PCM; CAR>>OPTION>>Set PCM System>>Reset PCM>>Vehicle Handover>>Yes>>Yes These instructions can also be found in the respective Owner’s Manuals for affected vehicles. Hopefully this may prevent Dealership / workshop visits. If your vehicle is already at the workshop, recommend that the technician update it to the latest available software level. **PLEASE NOTE: Performing a PCM Hard Reset will also erase all of the radio presets and Bluetooth connections and these will have to be reentered by you after the reset.** In order to rectify this issue, you will perform a “PCM handover” (also known as a PCM Hard Reset). Instructions are listed below; Press and hold the PCM>>Info button for approximately 10 seconds until the PCM reboots. Immediately select the following from the PCM; CAR>>OPTION>>Set PCM System>>Reset PCM>>Vehicle Handover>>Yes>>Yes WARNING Reboot for PCM 3.1.docx
  2. 2 points
    OK, first of all, either twisting wires together and wrapping them with tape, or using wire nuts is totally unacceptable for automotive applications. Both are pathways to shorts and even fires. Wires should be reconnected with crimp connectors at a minimum, with soldering them and then using heat shrink tubing to cover the soldered joints the actual preferred method. Most likely, in the process of doing this swap, you disturbed something, but exactly what is hard to say, particularly as the previous owner used the twisted wire and tape wrap method of connecting things. It is entirely possible that you may have pulled another such "MacGyver" like repair loose that is not related to the radio swap. Probably the best approach at this juncture is to get the vehicle scanned with a Porsche specific scan tool to see what the various communication modules are doing. Good luck with this one.
  3. 2 points
    Hi guys, I bought my 1999 Porsche 911 C4 Tiptronic back in January and I've been doing little projects on it ever since. I used to have a 2016 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack with a 6.4 liter V8 that I traded in last summer, but I was missing the sports car feeling too much so decided to buy the Porsche. One of the things that stood out to me on the test drive was just how sluggish and unresponsive the Tiptronic gearbox felt compared to the one I had in the Dodge. Since the rest of the car was in very good condition (invoices for every oil change & repair going back to 2003, IMS bearing changed, etc.) I decided to buy it anyway, assuming I would get used to having to mash my foot into the carpet everytime I wanted the thing to move. Looking through this forum and others, I heard about the Sprint Booster and how it might help with this problem. For those of you that don't know what this is, it is a small plug that sits between the gas pedal and the cable harness running to the ECU and that changes the signal sent to the car from the position of the gas pedal. The factory set up makes it so that when you push the gas pedal, the revs rise very slowly for the first 50% of pedal travel. I think I read somewhere that halfway down, the pedal will only give you about 25% of the power. This means that in order to get the Tiptronic box to do a downward shift, you really REALLY have to mash the pedal and do it in a quick manner. In general it makes the whole car feel unresponsive and not at all like the free-revving, happy sports car I thought I was getting. The Sprint Booster module (which only works on cars with electronic throttle control or "e-gas" pedal) will take the gas pedal input and modulate it to reflect a more aggressive pedal action. The only thing that changes really is the voltage that is sent to the car's ECU, and how this is calculated in relationship to the position of the gas pedal. The unit comes with a little control gadget where you can set it to one of three basic settings - Factory (simple pass-through, nothing changes from stock), Sport (about a 30% more aggressive response), and Race (about 50% more aggressive). Within both Sport and Race you can then fine tune with an additional setting from 1-9 for each of the two categories. By default the device will put you in "5" or the middle ground. The device costs you about $300 and there is no discount to be had from any of your typical market places. I simply bought mine directly at the manufacturer's website. Since it was my birthday last week, I decided to treat myself and see if it might work. You have a 30-day money back guarantee and the install process is completely reversible, so I figured I'd give it a go. If it actually helps make my tiptronic feel peppy it will have been worth every penny. If not, I'll just return it. For the installation my first problem was figuring out if my particular car had an e-gas or electronic throttle system or not. Looking at the gas pedal I can see a cable running up the bulkhead so I wasn't feeling too optimistic. With the help of others on this forum, I learned that all 996's have e-gas except the 98-99 C2. I also popped the hood and looked at the throttle body itself. To be extra sure, I also asked the vendor to confirm that my particular model would work with the product. The manufacturer's website only shows MY 2000 and beyond as approved for installation, but they came back and confirmed that in fact the -99 C4 does have e-gas and so I could proceed with the purchase. 3-4 days later I get the box in the mail. It is a tiny little thing and doesn't appear to be much for the $300 I paid for it, but whatever. The installation manual shows pictures of the device being plugged into a port located somewhere on the gas pedal assembly itself. It is clearly the most common spot for most manufacturers to link the throttle to the ECU, but that's not the case in a Porsche 996. The gas pedal pulls on a cable and if you follow the cable up from the pedal, you'll see it attaching to a metal box conveniently located under the actual dashboard, and at an impossible angle for any human being to get to. In these cases I like to resort to child labor, so I bribed my 13-year old son to help me. By laying upside down in the driver's seat and sticking his head + one arm under the dashboard, he was able to get the device plugged in correctly in as little as 2 hours. I was basically reduced to cheer leader, and voice of reason to guide his efforts. We made use of my cell phone camera to try and figure out from the pictures how to disconnect the old plug and get the new Sprint Booster in place. The pictures attached to this post will show you how we figured it out: The entire installation process is done by touch and feel as you cannot see any of the components directly. I would recommend our approach of using a camera, talking about what we need to do next, and then use your fingers & imagination to figure out what it is that you are doing. We found it helpful to start with where the cable attaches to the box, then run your fingers over until you hit the little metal flange that sticks out with the white plastic butt underneath it. When you have your hand there you know that the plug itself is just above it. After the initial installation we immediately took the vehicle out for a ride. The gas pedal felt weird, and we had intermittent revving and a noticeable delay when pressing the pedal. I figured it was simply down to the device having to calibrate itself so we went for a ride. 20 minutes in we get a check engine light come on so we headed back to the garage. Ever the optimist, I simply disconnected the battery to reset the CEL and then went out for another drive. This second time it worked beautifully! The car felt like a different animal all together, and the gas response was crisp and immediate. Problem solved, or so I thought, and we called it a day. The second day I went for a drive and got not only a CEL but also the PSM and ABS warning lights. At this time I was ready to call it a day and send the device back since I don't want to have to deal with buggy electronics or stuff that I can't trust. Called up the son again to have him pull everything out and that's when he noticed that the OEM male connector at the end came lose by simply touching it. Turns out we hadn't been able to plug it in all the way until it latched onto the Sprint Booster module. I guess it is not manufactured to the same tight spec as the OEM stuff, and by a fraction of a millimeter the plug can't go in far enough to secure it with the latches. Using force and patience, we eventually managed to push it all the way in until we heard the very satisfying "click" of the plug latching onto the module. If I have to take it off again because it comes loose, I will certainly use a file to remove a bit of material on each latch and ensure that they lock into place without having to push too hard. Since this point I have driven the car 4-5 times and about 50 miles, driving it as I usually do and without holding back in any way. No CEL or other warning lights and the thing runs really well. Having tried the different settings, I have decided to leave it in Sport-5 which I think is a happy medium for a sporty feel without compromising the ability to drive smoothly when you want to. Race mode makes it more binary, and it is like mashing the pedal at every stop light. It might be fun on a track, but for everyday driving it is just too aggressive. In Sport-5 it'll pull away softly in 2nd gear like it did with the factory settings, but if you simply give the pedal a little shove it'll immediately downshift to 1st gear and take off with gusto. All in all I have to say that this was very much worth it. The car feels different - more sporty and responsive, just like you'd want a Porsche to feel like. I know this doesn't add any power to the engine but just by having the Tiptronic gearbox work more like a modern sports car it really changes everything. I'm now planning on driving it for the full 30-day money back period, and if I run into any issue I will post an update to this forum. Cheers, Magnus Update - April 22nd, 2020: I've now driven with the Sprint Booster for 6 weeks and I can honestly say that this was the best bang for the buck modification that I've done to my Porsche. I would rate my Alpine head unit & speaker system upgrade as the mod that I most appreciate, but that was $2,400 and this was only $300. Just be careful with the installation and count on it being a PITA...
  4. 2 points
    Welcome to RennTech On cabriolets, the number 2 relay panel is mounted to the rear of the roll over protection frame. You need to put the top in the "service" position to gain access to it.
  5. 2 points
    Front trunk, rear engine cover, doors, center console, interior sensor.
  6. 2 points
    Are you sure you don't have fuses mixed up? I'm currently on 1 pump in my CS with fuse 14 pulled and can hear the right side pump running/whinning when the car is on. I think Fuse #14 is for the driver side pump and #13 is the right pass side pump, but feel free to correct me If I'm wrong USA
  7. 1 point
    Thank you for updating and information.
  8. 1 point
  9. 1 point
  10. 1 point
  11. 1 point
    I believe that I may have the photograph(s) that you are looking for but I have to find the old thumb drive where I had originally been storing them before discarding the excess files. When I get back to my office I will search and post what I find. Just to verify, by "Original All Metal Transmissions", you are referring to the "A Version" transmissions that used the original B-Pillar microswitch as a method to sense the position of the descending convertible top frame member (and, at the same time had the smooth surfaced drive cables (i.e., NOT the cross-hatched, less prone-to-stretch cables). Regardless, I will post photos ASAP. Regards, Maurice.
  12. 1 point
    While the vehicle may contain VW parts, some of them are running Porsche software, which the VCDS cannot even see. Sometimes these modules drop offline when there is a water short, assuming it is not totally dead, the PIWIS should be able to see and communicate with the module, bringing it back online so it can be calibrated. If the PIWIS cannot communicate, you will need a new module, which will need to be coded to the vehicle, which the PIWIS can also do. Just remember, the 911 and Boxster vehicles also carry VW components, but the VCDS is useless with them.
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
  18. 1 point
    They, and the con rod bolts should both be replaced.
  19. 1 point
    I agree with Pierre; a large expense with little benefit.
  20. 1 point
    996 Ignition Switch replace (just the switch) with pictures First off - thanks to everyone who has been down this road before me for providing tips and suggestions and troubleshooting regarding this common problem. I have been dealing with a key that would stay all the way to the right upon starting meaning that the A/C, heated seats and some other items would not function. My solution had been to simply start the car and then just move the key back one notch to the left and everything worked fine. So if others have that issue, my original solution Author scb71 Category Carrera (996) - Common Fixes and Repairs Submitted 09/16/2009 01:31 PM Updated 03/13/2017 05:24 AM  
  21. 1 point
  22. 1 point
    It is normal to hear more air flow noises with aftermarket filters. You could always test by putting the OEM filters back in.
  23. 1 point
    Welcome to RennTech! Beautiful looking car...….good luck with it.
  24. 1 point
    I've had one ABS pump on a BMW go south,, it made some really odd noises when the pressure pump started eating its own guts, if the accumulator does not come up to pressure,, it will run for quite a while,, You can always pull the ABS fuse and see if it still makes the noise.. Or pull the beuty cover in teh frunk and have someone turn it on whle you listen the pump is fairly obvious in my 2003.. 🙂
  25. 1 point
    Got an email about this and can't offer any mechanical advice but had a similar Durametric issue with the codes not matching Porsches codes. After numerous calls to Durametric, they acknowledged there was a bug in their 997.2 profile that transposed the digits. They were going to work on a fix so check to see if you have the most current rev. I never used it again so don't know firsthand. Good luck!
  26. 1 point
  27. 1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. 1 point
    Thomas, the pump literally is used to make sure the hot coolant flows back and circulates properly to the heater matrix(s)to keep passengers warm, it also send it back to the rear heater matrix (if fitted). Some cayenne have a.c. evaporator and heater matrix in the boot as well as in the lower dash. "Four zone climate control" option I believe it was called. The "rest" button just runs this pump when the engine is off and the passengers are asking for warm air still from the interior fan hence hot coolant is required to circulate by electric pump. Hello from the UK my friend.
  30. 1 point
  31. 1 point
    I had a similar problem recently. I had to replace the alarm module. About $150 and it is located on the middle of the firewall. I am 6’1” and have long arms and I still found it a pain to reach it. Several tutorials on the internet. Follow the steps in exact order it will help (ask me how I know this). The part is used on several cars over the years and is readily available. Do not buy a used one. They are known to fail with age. I hope this helps.
  32. 1 point
    I haven't tried the Autel scan tool so not sure how accurate it is. It would be nice if you could recheck everything with a Durametric. Assuming the Autel readings are correct, your bank 1 cam deviation is not in spec and should be corrected. You may want to replace the bank 1 chain tensioner and retime bank 1. The bank 2 cam behavior sounds suspicious. Could be the variocam actuator problem (sticky). Would be nice to check with Durametric to confirm before digging in further.
  33. 1 point
    I believe the Gates pump has a metal impeller: I am concerned that the pump was replaced because of overheating, not because the pump had failed or was making noise. The question is why was it overheating? At this juncture, if the car was in my shop, I would pull the water pump and look at both the impeller and the wall of the engine case. If the case is tore up, you are chasing your tail trying to get the system to work. As for the reviews of the pump, some "complain" the impeller is composite, others complain it is metal, so it sounds like they could go either way. In any case, we ONLY use the factory water pumps, which are all composite impellers, and work well, unlike several aftermarket brands we have looked at. Unfortunately, many aftermarket bits for Porsches are really junk; water pumps, surge tanks, and AOS units are great examples of what not to buy. We have seen several fail right out of the box. Yes, they are a few bucks cheaper, but after some people have gone through two or three units in quick succession, that few bucks looks like a really bad deal...…..
  34. 1 point
    I have yet to lick my car and the battery is just fine. 😂
  35. 1 point
    It depends how much. Top bar of the readout flashing? Or worse? Removing the oil filter and replacing will take out an amount to fix a small overfill. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  36. 1 point
    Probably not, the stalk functions as a momentary contact switch, if the mirror selector switch is on/off in two of the four positions, that would cause the OBC to continuously cycle in those position. You are also going to either purchase a premade aftermarket wiring harnesses for the cluster to function with either a dash switch or with the fourth stalk, or make up your own. Fabing your own is going to require finding specific size pin connectors to match the connectors already in the dash. VW used to carry them. It is much cleaner to use the fourth stalk, which can actually added without taking the column apart, or simply source the four stalk multifunctional switch and replace the three stalk. We have done several of these, but always replaced the multifunction switch with the four stalk version to retain the clean factory look to the conversion. If your dash displays the outside temp, the system is active.
  37. 1 point
    No, no one seems to have an answer.
  38. 1 point
  39. 1 point
    Running a bottle of Techron in the fuel system might help as well. Would not hurt anything to try. Particularly if the car has been sitting around for awhile.
  40. 1 point
    I don't know about the wheels, but wheels and car are "bad to the bone". You did good, congratulations...
  41. 1 point
    Well in my case the new Steeper Motor came with a plastic cap that had an insert with splines. So, I mark the old Steeper motor and I aligned the new one to match exactly the same position where the old one was. I utilized the plastic cap and rotated until it look identical to the mark of the old one. I apply some grease and it went in like butter. I change the Steeper Motor and the module to the new serial number mention above. And of course I change my 5 year old battery (even thought voltage was ok.) Finally, my 4 wheel warning light is gone on my Porsche Cayenne 2005.
  42. 1 point
    C1 to C4 are easy to remember for me so I always ask ppl to check those. You are right that one of them is for the fuel pump so it will not cause your symptoms. Next things to check are clutch switch (jump it) and make sure the battery cables are tight. Next place to check is the rear starter relay panel.
  43. 1 point
    The airbag control unit is usually right below the PCM - so check that wires were not damaged or accidentally disconnected.
  44. 1 point
    I have an OBD II reader from Auto Zone for $100 that will cancel a water temp gauge failure, but will not cancel/erace an airbag code. My water temp gauge failure is due to the Porsche computer doesn't recognize my LS3 motor. I also have the Durametric program which does it all. More expensive and you need a PC laptop. I bought an 11" Lenovo laptop for $119 from Best Buys that will run the Durametric program. If you plan on keeping the Porsche as I assume you do, then I would consider purchasing the Durametric program. The point is if you go with a cheapie OBD reader you need to be sure what it will and will not do... Are there any considerations as to running the car without functioning CATS?
  45. 1 point
    Activating the ABS/PSM pump and control system while bleeding is only required if air has gotten into the control network. During a normal maintenance flush, it is not required.
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    991-631-155-02 Direction Indicator Light (left) -- US MSRP $32.74 991-631-156-02 Direction Indicator Light (right) -- US MSRP $32.74 Your bulb should already be white so just change out the lens/socket assembly.
  48. 1 point
    Removal Convertible top in service position 1. Removing side-panel lining. Removing side-panel lining -1-. 2. Removing rear side window inner seal. Remove front and rear fastening screws -2- from the convertible top support and the mount for the belt guide section, and pull rear side window inner seal -3- up and out. 3. Closing side window. Press the micro-switch -4- in the windscreen frame and actuate the rocker switch -5- at the same time. 4. Releasing power window. Release adjusting elements with the adjustment tool -7-. To do this, loosen and unscrew the nuts -6- from the adjusting element. Adjustment tool for the rear power window. 5. Detaching convertible-top support. Remove fastening screws -2- and fastening nut -8- from convertible-top support -10- and pull the deflection fitting and mount for the belt guide section -9- up and out. Pull convertible-top support -10- inward and fix between B-pillar and the convertible-top support with a spacing block -12- dimension - A = 30 mm. 6. Removing power window. Push rear power window -11- upward and push both locking tabs of the electrical connection -13- outward and disconnect. Install 1.Inserting power window. Connect electrical plug connection -13-, insert power window -11- into the window shaft from above and position in the mounts in the inner side section. 2. Screwing down convertible-top support. Remove spacing block -12- between B-pillar and convertible top support -10-, Position fastening screws -2- and fastening nut -8- in convertible-top support -10- and tighten, Tightening torque 23 Nm (17 ftlb,). Push deflection fitting into the mount for the belt guide section -9-, Screw in and tighten fastening screws -2-. Tightening torque 50 Nm (37 ftlb.). 3/4. Adjusting and screw down power window. By moving the power window -4- with respect to the longitudinal axis of the vehicle, the power window can be adjusted by dimension Y = ± 10 mm, The contact pressure of the side window upper edge on the convertible top is adjusted by screwing the lower adjusting element -A- in or out by dimension X = ± 10 mm-, The contact pressure on the rear window inner seal or the offset from the door window is adjusted by screwing both of the upper adjusting elements -B- in or out by dimension X = ± 5 mm. Adjust the basic setting of the adjusting elements -B- of the top edge of the rear side section relative to the side window, Dimension C Front top edge of rear side section = 11 mm Dimension D Rear top edge of rear side section = 14 mm Push the power window backward or forward and adjust the gap between the side window and door window to E = 9 mm, Adjust the contour or the offset from the door window at adjusting element -A-, Tighten adjusting elements -A- and -B-, Tightening torque 23 Nm (17 ftlb.). 5. Installing rear side window inner seal. Insert rear side window inner seal -3- into rear side section slot and position on the convertible-top support or mount for belt guide section, Screw in and tighten fastening screws -2-. 6. Install side-panel lining.
  49. 1 point
    Thanks for the replies. When I bought the centre piece, it definitely made a big difference. I had my doubts about the mesh pieces. They are meshes for starters, and also they fit just behind the seat which doesn't make much sense. I will probably save my money on this one then.
  50. 1 point
    :welcome: Search is your friend... Carbon Canister removal is here
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