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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/19/2019 in Tutorials

  1. 1 point
    EDIT: Additional info added at bottom of tutorial, refers to recently found info, clarifying how many different fluids are needed for the 970 generation of Panamera PDK (at end of tutorial). Attached is a DIY for changing fluid on Panamera PDK transmission. Got this from a fellow forum member who happened to do the change. This should help many interested in doing maintenance on Panamera without paying thousands for it. Speaking to shop/dealer, after 60k, filter/pan replacement not absolutely necessary (cost of the kit is about $350). So for 60k, drain and refill fluid is fine. At 120k, you would do same fluid change, but this time replace the pan/filter as well. Read the entire DIY before you start to get a good idea of requirements and estimate time involvement for you to complete. Do not forget to replace the drain plug with its built in seal. Last thing you need is have a $15 part cause small leaking, and then have to put car up, open up drain plug, lose a bunch of expensive oil, just to put new drain plug in. So dont cut on this one part. You can get the Pentosine FFL3 PDK fluid directly from Porsche, or from Pentosine resellers. Porsche will charge you triple the price for identical fluid. You choose. Everything you need is mentioned in the DIY. Since Durametric does not have capability to monitor PDK temperature yet, you can use an IR thermometer, when you heat up the PDK to 40 celsius, after you put in 6-8 quarts or so, and when doing final level check. Good luck. 970 generation Panamera PDK transmission info: ZF is manufacturer of PDK transmission for Porsche They make 2 PDK transmissions One for mid & rear engine applications (911, boxter, etc) Another one specifically made for the Panamera Panamera PDK servicing requires two (2) fluids only (as compared to 3 fluids in other PDK car models at Porsche FFL3 fluid - Gearbox & clutches - need about 9 quarts Shell TF0951 - Front final drive - need about 0.4 quarts Here is the info dug up from ZF on this topic: "In fact, two separate DCT ranges or 'platforms' have been developed by ZF, both fitted with wet clutches, for use in Porsche's various longitudinal applications. The first is for use in the mid- and rear-engine sports cars (the 911, the Cayman and the Boxster), while a completely different platform has been developed for use in the larger Panamera. For each platform, two different torque options are available, with the 500N.m versions using an 'ND2015' clutch pack, and the 780N.m versions using an 'ND2216' clutch pack, both supplied by ZF Sachs....... In terms of the oil circuit itself, two completely different approaches have been employed for the two platforms. Non Panamera models: The 7DT45 and 7DT70 have two oil circuits, and hence two different oils; the first is Pentosin FFL-3 for the clutch and hydraulics, and the second is ExxonMobil Mobilube PTX 75W-90 for the gear-set and bevel gear. The oil levels have been kept as low as possible, to reduce churning losses for those moving parts that are immersed in oil. Panamera: Conversely, the 7DT75 has a single oil circuit and a dry sump (to minimize churning losses), with an 'active lubrication system' to feed oil to each gear-set and clutch. This version uses only the Pentosin FFL-3 lubricant, which was developed exclusively for the ZF DCTs. One of the main reasons for using a single oil circuit is that clutch cooling is required at both ends of the transmission, for the main dual-clutch module and for the hang-on clutch used in the four-wheel-drive variant. This would have presented significant sealing complications had multiple circuits been chosen." Bottom line: What this means is that the Panamera PDK uses transmission design which uses one fluid compartment for the gearbox and the clutches, and another separate compartment for the final drive. Two fluids total.
  2. 1 point
    This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time: ~2 hours If you’re getting a Durametric error code P0674, you likely have a bad PCV valve that needs to be replaced. An easy way to test a bad PCV valve is to unscrew the oil fill cap on the engine while it is idling. If you feel suction on the cap and/or the idle fluctuates once the cap is removed then your PCV valve is bad. The PCV valve is built into the valve cover so your options are to buy a whole new valve cover assembly (95510513500- ~$347) or buy just the PCV membrane (aftermarket $20-25) and replace it in your existing valve cover. To get access to the valve cover, you will need to follow this DIY article to remove the intake manifold first. Other reasons to remove the intake manifold are to service your fuel injectors or to make it much easier to replace the thermostat. The thermostat can be changed without removing the intake manifold (I did it twice), however you basically need to be a contortionist to reach the bolts to remove housing and you will scrape some knuckles along the way. Tools Needed: -Flathead screwdriver -Assortment of torx bits (T20, T25, T30, 6” long T30) -Pliers -Torque Wrench -3/8” ratchet set with various extensions and a universal joint -1 1/16” Deep socket -10mm Triple Square Spline Bit -Crescent Wrench -9/16” Open End Wrench -Dental pick Parts Needed: -Brake Booster Vacuum Hose- 95535557941 (your existing hose is probably brittle and will likely crack from removing it, I recommend getting a new one) -Lower Fuel Injector Seal Kit (3X) - 95511091000 (existing seals may be brittle and once you have removed the intake manifold, they may not seal properly upon reinstallation, I recommend getting new ones, need 3 sets) Procedure: First start by removing the plastic covers surrounding the engine. Using a flathead screwdriver, remove the quarter turn plastic trim fasteners. Rotate them in either direction by 90 degrees and pop them out. Be ready to catch them as sometimes they like to jump out. Next you will need to remove the 2 torx screws on either side of the engine cover with a T25 bit and the screw under the windshield washer reservoir cap with a T20 bit. Remove the oil fill cap and front engine cover by pulling straight up. They are held on by friction rings around a stud so pulling straight up will release it. Now that you have the covers removed, it’s time to remove the intake filter box and intake piping. Using your T25 torx bit, rotate the 2 screws until the dot on the screwhead lines up with the lower indication on the filter cover. Now gently use your pliers to pull them straight out. With your flathead screwdriver, pop up the two clips to release the filter housing. Pivot the filter house towards the passenger side of the car and remove it. Remove the engine air filter as well. Next, remove the wiring harness from the MAF sensor located in the middle of the intake piping. Loosen the clamp around the intake piping on the throttle body and gently work the intake piping back and forth until it releases from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt on the engine lift bracket and loosen the lower bolt with your M10 triple square bit. Then pivot the bracket towards the front of the car. Remove the bolt next to the throttle body with your M10 triple square bit. Then unplug the wire harness from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt from the bracket on the passenger side of the engine with your M10 triple square bit. Remove the vacuum lines from the intake manifold on the passenger side of the engine. One hose requires pliers to open the hose clamp, the other can be removed by hand if you squeeze the lock ring around the hose to release it. Next, from the passenger side, reach your hand around to the back side of the engine. There is a vacuum line that goes from the bottom surface of the intake manifold to the brake booster. You will need to pull the vacuum line fitting straight down to pop it out of the intake manifold. I don't have a good picture of it so here is a diagram of it. Pull down on the elbow fitting, not the hose. Also on the back side of the engine just behind the vacuum line you removed there is a bolt that needs to be removed using your M10 triple square bit. You are working blindly so locate the bolt first by feel and guide your bit to the bolt. Remove the 3 screws holding the actuator with a T25 torx bit. Slowly pull it straight out towards the front of the car. There is an actuator arm that attaches to a shaft on the passenger side of the part. Once you have enough clearance to reach your finger in there, you need to slide the arm off the shaft as you pull the entire actuator off. Then disconnect the vacuum hose from the actuator. Now pull the coolant hoses out of their holder in the intake manifold and push it towards the driver side of the car. There is a T25 torx screw that attaches this water hose bracket near the back of the intake manifold. The screw is facing up, so you need to use your T25 torx bit and get creative with removing that screw. I used a crescent wrench to turn the torx bit while holding the torx bit in place with my other hand. With the water hose bracket free, slide the water hose bracket towards the front of the car to release it from the intake manifold. This bracket has a keyhole slot that will release once it's slid forward. Remove the oil dipstick tube bracket with a T25 torx bit. Just push it out of the way once you remove the screw. With your long T30 torx bit, remove the bolt on the intake manifold that was under the actuator. Next, there are 3 blind holes on the driver side of the intake manifold. You need to use your long T30 torx bit to loosen the screws inside those holes. Those 3 screws are captive screws so they will not come out. There are 3 bolts below the intake runners. They need to be removed with your M10 triple square bit. This is where your universal joint will come in handy. The bolt near the rear of the engine required me to use my u-joint with various entensions to acess. At this point, you will hear gas leaking out. Since you have released the pressure from the lower fuel rail to the lower fuel injectors, the pressurized gas in the rail will leak out. Make sure you are working in a well ventilated area. From the driver side of the car, reach behind the engine to remove the wire harness from the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 1 1/16” deep socket, unscrew and remove the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 9/16” open wrench, unscrew the nut that connects the metal fuel line running from the lower fuel rail. The slimmer your wrench the better. My crescent wrench did not fit here. Now that the intake manifold is completely unbolted, you can start to wiggle it free. You will need to lift the manifold up from the passenger side and pivot it up towards the driver side. You will need to wiggle the lower fuel rail loose to release the metal fuel line you just unscrewed the nut from. It is a flare fitting that pushes into the upper fuel rail assembly. Be gentle here as you don’t want to bend the fuel rail. Once the metal fuel line is free from the upper assembly, you can remove the intake manifold as described above by lifting up from the passenger side first to pivot it off. At this point, you have access to the fuel injectors if you need to service them, the thermostat housing and the valve cover. Unbolting the valve cover is straight forward from here if you need to replace the PCV valve, etc. The fuel injector seal kit comes with a rubber o-ring, Teflon o-ring, Teflon sleeve and metal clip. At the bare minimum you should replace the rubber o-ring and Teflon o-ring. Use a dental pick to remove the old o-rings. These 2 parts are the wear surface when you remove/reinstall the intake manifold and are prone to fail if you re-use them. Trust me, I learned the hard way. To install the intake manifold, reverse the steps above. Take care in sliding the lower fuel rail back onto the lower fuel injectors and lining up the metal fuel line back into the flare fitting. I found it was easier to pull the lower fuel line out of the manifold to line the flare fitting up first, then pushing it into place in the intake manifold. You want to apply even pressure on the surface as you tighten all 7 of the bolts down on the driver side. Torque the 3 triple square bolts evenly to 6 ft lbs, torque angle 90 degrees, then a final torque of 22 ft lbs. The bolts holding the engine lift bracket are 17 ft lbs, the other triple square bolts holding the manifold on the head are 15 ft lbs. Once you get it all back together, turn the key to the ON then START position without your foot on the brake. This will run the fuel pumps to build pressure back up in the fuel rail. I removed the key and repeated 2-3 times to get the fuel pressure up. The first time you restart, it may take a couple seconds to fire up due to the fuel pressure needing to build back up. If you replaced your PCV valve, it may idle rough as the ECU needs to remap since it adapted to a leaking PCV valve over time. If you did not replace the fuel injector seals and smell gas/hear it leaking after shutting off the engine, then your seals failed and you need to repeat the procedure and replace those seals.
  3. 1 point
    Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. (Special thanks to Chuck Jones for being the guinea pig and for taking the photos.) Parts you will need: 997.624.113.00 Actuator Tools you will need: Very short Torx T20 driver and right angle ratchet or tool to use the short T20 in a very confined space Regular screwdriver, phillips screw driver, and 10 mm wrench to remove th wheel well liner 1. Jack the car so that right front wheel is off the ground and secure it with a jack stand. Remove the right front wheel. 2. Remove the wheel well liner by removing the the plastics rivets (pry them out with a regular screwdriver). As well remove the 10 mm nuts on each side of the axle. Now remove the phillips screws that fasten the wheel well liner under the front bumper and remove the wheel well liner (and set aside). 3. Locate the EVAP canister and remove the electrical connection at the top of the canister. Now remove the 10 mm nut that holds the canister in place. Remove gas the vapor lines - one at the top and one at the bottom (again by squeezing the connectors). Remove the EVAP canister by pulling gently back and forth until it releases from the rubber gromments 4. Look back up under the fender (now that the canister is out of the way) and locate the broken actuator. Now using the stubby Torx T-20 loose (but do not remove) the two T-20 screws. The actuator itself is a bit tough to get to and you will need a really short T-20 Torx head to loosen the two screws. I say loosen because that is all you need to do to remove the part - it sits in two "U" shaped slots. Remove the electrical connector (by squeezing the tab). Here is a pic of the new part - as you see the Torx screws are already in place so that is all you have to do to replace it. 5. Put the new part in place making sure you feed the emergency pull line through the fender to its location in the door jam. There is room to slide it through the side so you don't need to try and thread it through the hole. Fasten the two Torx screws and reconnect the electrical connector. Chuck's car had the guide rose guide piece missing (so he needed to order one) Here is a pic of his car (without guide rose) and my car (with guide rose). Ref. P/N 997.624.505.00 We also noticed that on his car the plastic catch for the lock was missing (so he needed to order that too). Here is a pic of his car (without cap) and my car (with cap). Ref. P/N 996.201.243.00 6. Reinstall the EVAP canister by pushing it into place on the rubber gromments. Then reattach the vapor lines (they should snap back into place) and the electrical connection. Finally put the 10 mm nut back in place and tighten down. 7. Reinstall the wheel well liner (reverse of removal). 8. Mount the tire, lower the car and re-torque the wheel bolts. Done.
  4. 1 point
    Here is a documented guide to overhauling the Boxster's speaker systems for improved sound. I did this for under $600, and the difference is astonishing. Covers front,rear, and door speaker systems. Well illustrated, and contains a detailed section dealing with updating the door speakers from 5 1/4" to to 6 1/2" drivers while maintaining a completely stock appearence. Hope this helps many a Boxster owner. First986NJ UPDATE 4/23/08: Wow, 2600 downloads - cool! Hi Guys, a couple of updates: 1) The article referrs MB Quart drivers being used. While these are fine drivers and many people like them, I found them a bit too bright for my tastes. My car now has Polk Audio db series drivers throughout (db651's in the doors and db401's in the dash) and I am even happier with the sound. I also eventually replaced the (4) 3 1/2" drivers in the PNP rear shelf kit with Polk Audio db351's and they improved the sound back there noticably. Infinity Kappa's were considered, and I listened to them, but I found the Polks slightly tighter sounding and so I went that way. The two were VERY close in both price and quality. 2) Something new on the door speakers......... Kicker has recently come out with a 6.5" sub that is perfect for the Boxster doors! It is a 6.5" CompVT Shallow Series Subwoofer, Frequency response: 25-350 Hz ,Sensitivity: 85 dB ,Impedance 4 ohms ,Peak Power Handling 300 watts ,RMS Power Handling 150 watts. Top Mount Depth is 2-13/16" and Cutout Diameter 5-9/16". Available at Crutchfield and Woofersetc.com. I have not yet put a set in my doors, but fully intend to very soon. Andy Guide_to_Modifying_the_Boxster_Sound_System.pdf
  5. 1 point
    997 Turbo Bumper removal, Radiator cleaning, and Mesh Grill Install: Removed front bumper assembly, cleaned radiators, and fabricated and installed new aluminum mesh grills to block some of the trash. Took photos, and documented the process I used and created a simple do-it-yourself website. I am no expert, and I am sure there are many ways of doing this..So if it helps, Great! If you know a better way...go for it. TheRocksFront MeshGrillsDIY.pdf
  6. 1 point
    Many thanks to all that have guided me on my quest to understand and then accomplish tasks that before this forum and it's members I would not have even contemplated. And it's FUN plus my wife likes it because I'm saving some money doing routine service myself. That being said I am now going to try my first DIY Post on a little fun project I did in approx 2 hours and boy did it turn out well. I got the idea when I was admiring a fellow co-workers Carrera with the shiny enameled center wheel covers. Upon doing some research I discovered they are expensive and often times stolen. We have a family owned 1998 986 that is STOCK BASIC and it needed a bit of color as it's the classic Arctic Silver Met with a black top and interior. The only other color on the car is the hood crest. So being an avid modeler in my youth and also today went into my hobby man cave and discovered that I had on hand all the necessary items needed to spruce up my basic black and silver wheel centers. Here are the steps and the items you'll need to complete this easy fixer upper. 1. Find a local hobby store or online and buy the following: Tamiya Acrylic paint in the following colors, Semi Gloss Black, Red, Gold and you'll also need some thinner I just use the Tamiya thinner. YOU MUST USE ACRYLIC as it holds it's color and after being shot with 3 coats of clear will last a long time! 1 Can of Dupli-Color High Performance Wheel CLEAR Pep-Boys 1 Set of hobby brushes small tipped (tight spaces on the wheel centers) 2. Approx. 2 hours of your time and bit of a steady hand but dont worry with a paper towel, thinner and a toothpick you can correct your errors if you cant stay inside the lines. :) Cost under $25.00 3. CLEAN CLEAN CLEAN the wheel centers a good dish soap or degreaser is best DRY COMPLETELY. 4. Start with the hard color 1st GOLD dont be put off it takes 2 coats and gold hobby paint is the worst color to apply just be patient after 1 coat dries apply the second and you'll see what I mean. Next do the RED. Then finally the BLACK. Set aside to dry for about 1/2 hour (have a Stella) then get out your clear coat and LIGHTLY apply 1 then 2 then 3 coats make sure you allow about 20 min for the clear to dry between coats. The wheel centers have recessed portions for each color so it's easy to paint dip the color into the spot where it belongs. TAA DAA your done and here are the results along with the products I used. Guess what my fellow co-worker thinks they look great! Take all look at the pics and you'll see the products and the results. Have fun!
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