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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/15/2020 in Posts

  1. Some after photos... Definitely took more time cleaning than building this motor....
    3 points
  2. The headlights look fine to me.... people obsessing over headlights and BS like that are what makes the 996TT still one of the best cars out there, pound-for-pound, dollar-for-dollar
    3 points
  3. You can get a set of small "ez out" hex bits, one of which should fit tightly into the bolt head while rotating counter clockwise, which will loosen the stripped fastener. Amazon and others sell them (Amazon screw/bolt extractor set)
    3 points
  4. I created a video on how to remove and disassemble the front door. This includes removing the bottom trim strip, door lock, door handle, inner door panel, window/frame and door shell.
    2 points
  5. The factory default for the valves is the loud position, so if they are not hooked up, that is what you get. The valves only move to the "quiet" position when activated. The original reason for the valves was the incredibly restrictive Swiss noise laws for residential neighborhoods, so when the vehicle was operating a low speeds, it was quiet.
    2 points
  6. If you are even considering that, that's because you don't really like the car and should sell it. To me. For cheap.
    2 points
  7. Sometimes when there is a voltage spike to the system (like connecting a new battery) the programming can get "mixed up". When this happens the best thing to do is have a tech/shop with a PIWIS re-program the affected control module(s). I think it very rare to replace a DME if most everything but one or two items are not working.
    2 points
  8. As someone that spent a significant part of his career in the battery business, your use of "assuming the proportions are the same" is more than seriously flawed. The CCA test used by the BCI (Battery Council International, the international technical consortium that sets standards for battery ratings and testing procedures used by battery manufacturers world wide) is very similar to the one used by the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers); which requires storing the finished and fully charged battery a 0F (-17.8 C) for a period of 24 hours, then load testing it to determine its CCA rating. There is no known "proportioning" formula for determining this value, only hard testing data. Lightweight battery manufacturers have been "inventing" unique rating values and "equivalencies" without a basis in technical facts, and that are really totally meaningless, simply because they know what the outcome of publishing the more widely accepted testing data would be: Their batteries would appear weak compared to conventional SLI (starting, lighting, ignition) batteries.
    2 points
  9. All of the larger cables are susceptible to this problem. The longer the cable, like to the starter, the worse the problem because their length exacerbates the resistance issue, leading to larger voltage drops. The only real trick to checking each one with either a multimeter or Power Probe unit (Power Probes actually have a specific setting for checking voltage drops, plus the Power Probe's long leads back to the battery make the testing process easier).
    2 points
  10. Your stated voltage measurment is weak. You should be testing the primary cables, the large ones running from the battery to the ground and starter, these are the ones that tend to develop internal corrosion. If you are unfamiliar with this test, do a search as this has been covered several times previously. We always load test both the alternator and battery when there is a problem. While this requires a load tester, it verifies that both are capable of delivering both the correct voltage and current (amps) as required.
    2 points
  11. +1 Sunset Porsche is an excellent site p.s. I see you're in Brooklyn. I used to live in Clinton Hill.
    1 point
  12. Shops tend to function like the distillation process; very few cars come in to tell us everything is fine, and the owners have absolutely no problems 😉 Roseann Rosannadanna was correct, "...'if it's not one thing, it's another"...it's always somethin'."
    1 point
  13. I had this and ended up having to replace the window as the inner stop is bonded to the glass, not cheapi had a similar issue and as the strip and inner seal is bonded to the glas s it need a whole new screen, they were not for me separate replaceable itema
    1 point
  14. Yep looked around. You need to move to the UK now
    1 point
  15. 8N2 837 016 B door lock with door contact switch - right rhd - US MSRP $282.94
    1 point
  16. Welcome to RennTech Porsche magazines like Panorama and Excellence have run articles from time to time listing colors by popularity, you might want to search old issues.
    1 point
  17. Part of that rise in price is driven by concern over the widening move to EV's.
    1 point
  18. Fault code 2039 - Potentiometer, transfer box Possible causes of fault - 'Short circuit to B+': signal line of potentiometer '1/2' (sensor 1/2) short circuit to B+ (12 V) - 'Short circuit to B+': transfer box control unit faulty - 'Open circuit/short circuit to ground': signal line of potentiometer '1/2' (sensor 1/2) open circuit or short circuit to ground - 'Short circuit to ground': potentiometer faulty - 'Open circuit/short circuit to ground': transfer box control unit faulty - 'Implausible signal': potentiometer faulty Fault code 2053 - Transfer box control module Possible causes of fault - No signal from transfer box control module Best do some wiring tracing looking for open circuits or ground faults. Any damaged cables, wires, or connectors. Remove connectors look for damage including water damage.
    1 point
  19. Just go to your name at the top right then choose Account Settings - then Signature.
    1 point
  20. what I contemplated doing was lifting up the bottom seat to expose the motors, then by splicing in some 12V and ground to make the motors move. But I never did it. I would contemplate doing it if the seat was way out of position. The seat control and memory module is #12. For that price not about to go through the contortions of getting the whole seat out. See diagram w/motors here Carrera Seat Adjuster Comfort Seat WWW.AUTOATLANTA.COM
    1 point
  21. I bought the Porsche factory manuals (all 17 volumes in 3-ring binders) in 2000 for about $600. I then spend about $100/year each for the next 6 years to get updates. My factory manuals ended up about costing $1200. Porsche stopped printing manuals a few years ago and the set was well over $1200 at that time. That does not really cover everything - you also need the OBD II manuals for DME 5.2.2. DME 7.2, and DME 7.8 depending on your model year. When I bought my OBD II manuals (again in 2000) they were about $200 each. So to cover all models it cost me about $600. Porsche also stopped printing these manuals a few years ago and at the time each was over $800. So all totaled I likely spent over $2000 for the factory service and OBD II manuals for the 996. For $138 (on Amazon) you get the Bentley Porsche 911 Carrera Service Manual (996) hardbound manual with photos that the factory manuals don't have - and from I can see so far 99% of the information that is in the factory manuals. BOTH service manuals and OBD II manuals. The manual layout is excellent logically each section from General Information and Maintenance to Wiring Diagrams and OBD II. Roughly 11 sections with great detail and photos the factory manuals never had. 1024 pages (and over 7.6 pounds) the manual is well composed and covers even some of the more tricky tasks. The photos are certainly worth a thousand words many times over. Clear, concise, detailed and from what I can see complete - this IS the service manual to have if you own or work on the 996 series cars. I highly recommend it. Updates and Videos can be found here Here are a few photos I took of the book..
    1 point
  22. Yes there are a lot of threads about this failure... https://www.6speedonline.com/forums/996-turbo-gt2/218729-fuel-pump.html https://www.6speedonline.com/forums/996-turbo-gt2/219788-fuel-pump-fuel-pump-fuel-pump.html https://www.6speedonline.com/forums/996-turbo-gt2/180764-fuel-pump-system-exposed-couple-pictures.html
    1 point
  23. Low fuel pressure - either a leak or a worn out fuel pump.
    1 point
  24. Well, I suffered 'while you're in there' syndrome... I discovered that all of my cooling system hoses, couplings, and tubes were rusted so I removed them but in doing so I decided to remove practically everything except the steering unit. This is the price you pay for enjoying drifting in the snow! It was worth it! I then discovered Dry Ice Blasting so all of the re-usable components were blasted clean. Next, I painted everything with a under body paint. (masked off all of the mating surfaces). The bearing pressed in easily as I heated the wheel housing to 100C and froze the bearing over night. So now I'm off to put things back together! The only challenge was figuring out how to align the cross-over tubes which have to be inserted after the cross member/steering gear are in place... My rear struts (the reason for all of this) are still on back order... I also discovered that I need B8's to match the lower spring height of the i030 suspension setup... I discovered this when the spring was loose during a test fit. Anyway, B6 vs. B8: B6 is for normal suspension, normal spring height, B8 is for lower spring height, Damping is the same, B8's have the proper spring pre-tension. Oh well... B6's are on ebay.
    1 point
  25. The code is pretty specific, it is seeing a difference between where the MAF is and where the throttle body is located; the leak has to be in between those two elements, but does not preclude that there may be other leaks that have not thrown codes.
    1 point
  26. P0441 code is EVAP purge valve, alongside the drive side intake manifold tubes. P2281 Code is most likely an air leak between the MAF and the throttle body, the code generally means that the powertrain control module (PCM) has detected a degree of airflow at the mass airflow (MAF) sensor which does not exist at the throttle body.
    1 point
  27. Did you use the procedure in the Lost Radio Code FAQ to get the correct serial number (in the display)? If not, please do so and re-submit the correct serial number.
    1 point
  28. The inner temperature sensor is located on the right in the plenum panel (at the air inlet housing for air conditioning). 1. Unscrew fastening screws 1 and remove air inlet housing cover 2. 2. Turn inner temperature sensor clockwise arrow and remove it to the rear. 3. Disconnect connector 1 from the inner temperature sensor 2. Installation is performed in reverse order.
    1 point
  29. On thing you are not considering is that the control module itself may be involved. If that is the case, you are going to need a sharp tech and access to the PIWIS system.
    1 point
  30. Driving wind can also make such a noise, tape the seems from the front trunk to the other body parts with duck tape, the seals around the front windshield, the seams from the convertible top to the windshield(s) etc., do test drives to locate the noise. Of course, it would be easier to use an ultrasonic device if possible.
    1 point
  31. Normally, if the light cannot be soldered or otherwise repaired, it is time for a new light.
    1 point
  32. My experience: dido@didotuning.pl e-mail and www.didotuning.pl for the website. They take Paypal and write decent English. My order, shipped, was 185 zloty’s or $50. Got a set from them a year ago. Takes 20 minutes to put them on and they look great.
    1 point
  33. It connects to a vacuum line that goes to the switching solenoid.
    1 point
  34. As I recall there is a cap on the inside of the car that gives you access to remove it.
    1 point
  35. 991 S (both C2S and C4S) Front new: 34 mm minimum (after machining): 32.6 mm wear limit: 32.0 mm Rear new: 28 mm minimum (after machining): 26.6 mm wear limit: 26.0 mm
    1 point
  36. Hi All, I'm just about to order a 2014 off the dealer lot and it doesn't have any stereo upgrades (no bose, no pcm, no stereo plius, just the 2x25 watts). I currently have a 987 that I'm trading in that did have the Bose. I love music, but this is what they got on the lot. I want to just add a simple self powered kenwood sub under the seat (sw11) or similar this year and then later on upgrade the door speaker and and a decent amp. I want to know if there is ANY way to get a line out from the factor head unit, as I want to keep that stock. I don't want to use a JL Clean Sweep as the audio is not that great out of it, I would prefer to come line out directly from the factory unit. Worse case scenario if there is no way of getting a clean line out, does the base CDR31 have aleat a non-digial analog output on the wiring harness that I can put a clean sweep gadget to convert the highs to lows. Thanks. Looked all over the web but cant find a wiring output for the cdr31
    1 point
  37. I got a PM where someone asked the dimensions of my tool, here it is. Print the image and give it to a person who can drill the tool out of nylon or something similar (strong but softer than metal). First check my image and then when fabricating the tool, make sure that the - first dimension is <105mm - second dimension is >85mm - third dimension is >43mm - first depth is 13mm - second depth is at least 13mm + 6mm You also have to drill a hole for the pin, paint pin and then try to fit the tool and you'll see which place to drill. How much over or under you wish to go depends on how good drill you have, but I'd use 0.2mm difference to ensure it fits reasonably easy and that the extraction is also easy. When using such tool, I'd advise using clean gloves and clean crankcase surfaces with isopropyl alcohol. Do not apply anything else, e.g. grease or such, latest RMS itself has PTFE coating and you should not touch it with bare hands. Correct installation depth is 13mm from the face of the crankshaft where the flywheel mates to the crank when using latest model of RMS (in my case I used 997-101-212-01-M17) as of the date when this message was written. Before you start tapping RMS in with this custom tool, try to set it as level as possible to the crank with your both hands (use gloves) and push it as deep as it goes with ease. Then tap it in from the center. I'd suggest you check how it goes in by using caliper every now and then. At least I had to tap a bit to non center position to get it in level to 13mm depth. (edited wording on correct installation depth, thanks JFP) Best of luck!
    1 point
  38. All ignition system component's age with use, and as compression ratios go up, and obviously even more so in turbo or supercharged engines where the cylinder peak pressures escalate even more quickly, the more quickly the ignition components become unable to "light the fire", sometimes on just an intermittent level. So what you are seeing is not at all unusual or unexpected, and it is also why full race engines resort to multi spark and really high voltage ignition systems. The penance you have to pay for higher HP output on the street is more frequent maintenance and often higher quality ignition components.
    1 point
  39. I don't know where you got your price quote, but you can buy the Stant pressure tester (STA 12270) for $72.38 on Amazon, or $69.78 at ToolTopia. As for Porsche adaptors, there are two; 12016 will test the vehicle and sells for about $40; 12017 will test the cooling system cap, and sells for about $10. I have two of the Stant testers, and an entire case full of adaptors to fit just about anything, and I didn't pay anywhere near $500 for everything.......................
    1 point
  40. I'm thinking of removing the back seats in my '06 997. More of a GT3 look. Loren suggested I reach out to you to see how you car came out. I want to remove all including seat belts and bottoms. I look forward to hearing back from you! Thanks, Don Hi it is really easy once you've done it. Keep that in mind as you walk through these instructions. On each side you see little black plastic bolt covers, snap them out/off, and you'll see a bolt holding an adjustable bracket for the seat back. Now remove the bolt and do the same on the other side. In between the backs you'll see a little triangular shaped plastic cover(#8 in the diagram). You'll need to raise the front lip of it away from the carpeting and at the same time pry it towards the front of the car. it is shaped a lot like a dog's head biting the bar that the seat backs are on bear that in mind when prying. If you put a screwdriver in the back of the dogs mouth and pry it off of your seat bar. You'll see the final piece of the puzzle once it is off. HTH
    1 point
  41. 1. Pull engine cover vertically upwards and off. 2. Separate the six ignition coils from the wiring harness. Refer to the following note for more information. It is very difficult to access the ignition module plugs to unlock them. Therefore, use a suitable tool (e.g. a bent piece of wire) for unlocking. Press the plugs against the ignition module to facilitate unlocking. Otherwise, the plug locks may break. 3. Press plugs down slightly, unlock with a suitable tool (e.g. bent piece of wire) and remove. 4. Pull out ignition coil and lay it aside. 5. Remove the spark plugs. 6. Check electrode gap. The electrode gap for the spark plug must be 1.1 mm. 7. Tighten spark plugs using special tool (spark plug wrench 3122B ). New spark plugs are tightened to 20 Nm (15.0 ftlb.) when first tightened. 8. Install the plug coils. When doing so, make sure that the straight surface is pointing to the intake pipes. 9. Reconnect the ignition coil. The connectors must engage audibly. 10. Clip on engine cover and check that it is seated correctly.
    1 point
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