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JFP in PA

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Everything posted by JFP in PA

  1. +1 on using anti-seize. Also be aware that the plug has a small aluminum crush ring on it, which should be replaced. Only cost a couple of cents, but can be a source of leaks
  2. There is absolutely nothing wrong with the triple square fastener, provided you don't use the wrong tool on it and mangle it. We pull these out all the time, using a 10 mm XZN socket, and never have any issues. Right tool for the job makes all the difference. You can find full sets of XZN sockets on Amazon for less that $25, and as there are other "triple square" fasteners strewn through out the car as well, having the set makes a lot of sense………….
  3. Loren is correct; too many mistake the XZN "Triple Square" fasteners for a torx and end up mutilating it..................
  4. Can't help you there as the ones I did had new (GT3 I think) bumpers installed................
  5. Bad idea. Adding spacers would in effect increase the leverage the bar has on the fasteners, weakening the entire structure. Besides which, no sanctioning body I know of would ever approve it………..
  6. Steve, the reason that automotive cooling hoses have "threads" in them is the same reason that tires do: Strength. Long term strength under pressure, temperature, exposure to glycols, and vibration/flex are required for automotive hoses to survive long term. The last point is important as automotive hoses have to be able to flex and bend while hot or cold; dishwasher hose does not, and only sees dirty tap water. The parts your photo shows are for a dishwasher drain line, which is very low pressure (a small pump pushes drain water into your sink, venting to atmosphere), so they are not designed to stand much pressure. My concern would be that the dishwasher hose will give out and require pulling the nose apart again after flat bedding the car home. I’d go with automotive hose and some sort of adaptor…….
  7. You can cut a groove in it with either a Dremel tool or a rotary die grinder, which would do what Mike is talking about; but is going to get a lot of metal into the motor. I'd try the bearing puller first........ .
  8. No. You need to pull the axle (doesn't always come out without difficulty, disconnecting the hub from the lower control arm helps) in order to use the tool. By that time, it is just as easy to pull the hub out and do it on the bench or in a press............. The tool works fine instead of a press, but you need to get at it from behind in order for it to work..............
  9. Something must have changed since I did one of these (which was some time ago), perhaps they stopped making the "stepped" hoses and went with the OEM stock "S" layout units. In any case, I think that Wayne may have your solution, with one exception: rather than just use the single copper plumbing adaptor (which has very limited gripping surface for the hose), I would also sweat a short length of the correct size copper tubing into both sides to give you more surface to grip to. Parts shouldn't cost all that much, and should only take a few min. to cobble togeather..............
  10. You need an adjustable "inside bearing/race puller", looks like this:
  11. One application of a .50 Cal. Desert Eagle will solve the issue quickly and permanently................
  12. To do it properly, you will need to determine the heat transfer capacity of the original Tip center radiator, and mount enough air/oil capacity coolers in front of the outside radiators to make up for it. Unfortunately, this will also reduce the outside radiators capacity to some degree as well, leading to a "running hot" situation. You are somewhat in a "no win" situation as these cars were never designed to run a Tip without the center radiator…….
  13. If you are pulling the IMS bearing, the shaft is typically full of oil and it will drain all over the place if you do not have a catch pan handy. In any case, I would strongly suggest changing the oil and filter when you are done with this project............
  14. Safest thing is to use the OEM coolant, which you can get from Sunset, a board sponser if I am not mistaken..........
  15. If your engine blows with a quality 10W-40 in it, no oil was going to be able to help it.............. And, by-the-by, Syntec 10W-40 holds ACEA A3, B3, B4; and the B4 specifically addresses its ability to hold up under high temp/high shear with fuel dilution conditions.....
  16. I think that the brand of oil you have been using is known to have lousy film strengths, dismal ability to hold up under shear and temperatures, and often shows TBN values indicating it's toast in as little as 3,000 miles of easy driving. The 10w-40 Syntec is just the opposite, holding up well for much longer. Give it a try.....
  17. Considering where you live, go the Castrol Syntec 10W-40, you just might be surprised at the difference............. Castrol currently only offer the Edge in North America in 5w and 10W-30 weights; it also does not offer the Edge Sport products here either, and currently had not plans to introduce it according to my Castrol rep.......
  18. 2000 986's still had dipsticks; check it to see how full it is. As Mike noted, you can get about a quart out by pulling the filter cannister..........
  19. I would be looking for a warped disc; check them for run out using a dial indicator..........
  20. If the dealer has correctly checked the external linkage, and nothing is wrong, it is time to pull the gear box............. A good time to upgrade your IMS and RMS as well.....
  21. It should. The only caveat it to keep the Durametric current on upgrades as Porsche seems to keep adding stuff with each model year (e.g.: DFI controls). You can also drop Durametric an email to see what they have to say…………..
  22. Wow 20 Hours, you can pull it -- and be down to the crank and start putting it all back together long before 20 hours :-) mike That's what I was thinking Mike, if I had a tech take 20 hours to do an IMS/RMS retread, he wouldn't be working here very long............... One thing you need to be cognizant of is that most dealerships still think you have to “split the cases” on all IMS jobs, which is obviously not the case.........a bad pun to say the least.........
  23. That is ridiculous………….. Pulling the gear box (on a lift with all the necessary tools) is a couple of hours job. Granted, the Tip complicates the process a bit, but I have no idea what they are going to be doing for 20 hours………..
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