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pfbz

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pfbz last won the day on February 14 2018

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About pfbz

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  • From
    CO
  • Porsche Club
    PCA (Porsche Club of America)
  • Present cars
    2003 Carrera 2
  • Former cars
    1983 911SC

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  1. Thank for helping to document the process so thoroughly! Couple of additional notes: This mod works equally well on 'sport' (round airbag) and regular (triangular airbag) wheels.... But the airbags themselves are quite expensive. So unless you can source a wheel with the correct airbag at a decent price, make sure your spare wheel uses the same airbag as your current car. You can of course just modify your existing wheel without buying the spare wheel, I just liked modifying the spare wheel to as I had never done it before. Also, Mk II (997.2, 987.2) steering wheels will fit and bolt up, but they use different airbags than either 9x7.1 steering wheels, so again this would only work if you source an airbag as well. The wiring harness connector is likely different as well.You shouldn't need a durametric to reset codes after this mod. It is pretty common to get a variety of errors (psm, pasm, etc) after disconnecting the battery. A short drive cycle usually gets everything back to normal.Airbags can be dangerous... Be extra sure to disconnect the battery and any other power source before working with them. DO NOT keep the car hooked up to a battery maintainer during the work! It doesn't hurt to turn on the headlights or honk the horn after you disconnect the battery just to ensure there is no residual charge in the system.I tapped the paddle switches and used metric bolts, but I think self-tapping screws designed for plastic are what the paddles are actually designed for. Either one should work.How it looks on a 'Sport' wheel:
  2. No, you need three relays. My diagram shows how three inexpensive relays can be wired together to make a pulse-latching circuit. The Porsche switch is not shown at all in my diagram. Your switch would connect to the "[+] Pulse to turn on" and "[+] Pulse to turn off" lines in the diagram. If the other diagrams posted are correct, it looks like switch terminal 1 goes to turn on, 2, to turn off, 3 to 12V power. But honestly, if this kind of stuff isn't familiar to you, get some help lest you accidentally short/smoke something... If you do it yourself, make sure you pull the correct fuses or better yet remove the negative lead from the battery when doing your wiring and triple check everything before reconnecting power.
  3. You can also use cheap/simple automotive relays to convert pulses from a momentary switch to a latched output... Something like this: These are standard automotive lighting relays... Total overkill for the application as they can handle pretty high current, great for driving lights and such, but they are cheap and readily available for a few bucks each.
  4. I didn't think the quad-ground type plugs were really meant for any adjustment... It is also much more difficult to measure than a standard plug.
  5. I would have bet money that there would be no noticeable performance difference between different brands of quality spark plugs that are of proper spec and not defective... but I guess I'll replace the plugs and see if it makes a difference. I'm sure the job will be much easier the second time, but honestly I'm not looking forward to dealing with Cylinder #4 again. I picked up some new tools that should make it a bit easier, a ratcheting bit wrench for the coil pack torx bolts and ratcheting external torx wrench for the covers, but those muffler mounts make the plugs and coil packs a bit hard to get to, with or without the mufflers on!
  6. 2004 C2, 57K miles. Just did some service work on my C2 and replaced my spark plugs. Car was running great, but did it as part of 60K service. [*]No history of CEL's prior to change. [*]Plugs removed were BERU Ultra R6-336. [*]All looked fine with good color and minimal electrode wear. [*]All coil packs/wires/connectors looked great and were reused. [*]Spark plugs were replaced with Bosch FGR5KQE0. Gapped as set from factory, not mis-handled or dropped. [*]Plugs were torqued to spec. Since I removed the mufflers for improved access, I took them to a local shop while they were out and had a gundo/fister type 2 modification done on them, essentially connecting the input and output pipe with a new piece of 2" tubing. This shop has done many of these before... Car is back together and running... I've had it out for a few drives since the work, and to me it feels rougher, particularly during warmup and maybe even less power. Maybe even detecting a minor misfire when cold? I'm not getting any CEL lights. Rechecked connectors, all are tight. Some thoughts and questions: [*]Obviously it could be the exhaust, and perhaps the ECU not yet adjusted to a slightly increased airflow or just feeling the roughness of more exhaust resonation? [*]How quickly should the ECU remap to any changes to fuel mixture due to exhaust and/or plugs? Can I speed up the process by removing the battery terminal? [*]If I am getting misfires, how tolerant is the ECU before it will trigger a CEL? Can i assume that if I'm not getting a CEL, the engine isn't misfiring and fuel trims are fine? [*]Is there any way to log any ECU data short of buying a durametric? [*]Could the Bosch plugs be making the difference? I'm sure I could do the job a second time much faster, but cylinder 4 seems like a major PITA even now that I know the procedure! [*]Any other thoughts? I'm always hyper-sensitive to how a vehicle is running after I work on it, and perhaps it's all in my head... Also, I'm not sure I love the louder exhaust.... I really miss hearing the intake howl (had previously done the silicone tubing intake od) and it makes me feel a bit like a tool now when I open her up on an entrance ramp or something. Am the only person in the world that doesn't like the Fister exhaust??
  7. I do have an iPhone, and have also set that up (through jailbreak) to act as a hot spot... It works, but it seems a bit clumsy for what I want. Take the phone out of my pocket, turn the hot spot on, plug in the phone to a second power line to ensure I don't kill my batteries running it as a hotspot, and then undo it all when I get where I'm going. Far better than not having any wifi integration in the car, but not nearly as seemless as an iPad with built in LTE.
  8. No problem posting the link... Happy to answer any questions the group might have, though I'll need to use google translate if they ask in german! As for the back up camera, I love the idea but I believe that if you use wifi to connect to the camera, it will effectively turn off the 4G data connectivity... definitely a problem. Bluetooth would be a better solution, but Apple is very particular about its bluetooth connections and won't allow the iPad to connect to unsecure bluetooth data devices. Happy to try and figure it out if anybody can loan the device! :D
  9. Progressive Shift Light / LED Tachometer One of the things I missed most about my '82 SC was the great big, super-easy to read VDO tach... And you could index redline at twelve o-clock! Maybe it is better with white or silver faced gauges, but I don't find the tach on my 996 particularly easy to read at a glance or out of my peripheral vision, so I decided to add an LED tach/shift light. I had read some good things about the Ecliptech Shift-i progressive shift indicator, so I decided to give one a try. $183 shipped... Got some time to install it today, so far very happy! I decided to mount it on the stationary part of the steering console. It comes in two versions, flat base or curved base. I ordered the curved base. As it turns out, the flat base might have been a bit easier to install in the spot I finally selected... No worries, I cut a small piece of Kydex and got out the heat gun to make a bracket for my curved shift light. I also used some friction tape to bundle the Shift-i wires into a harness. Closest stuff I've found to what Porsche uses for their harnesses. Wiring is pretty easy. The Shift-i has three wires it needs connected. Switched power (red), ground (black), and a tach signal (blue). I had seen a couple of other installation notes describing taking apart the instrument panel and/or the center console to get power and ground and route the wires... All completely unnecessary. Porsche's manufacturer-specific additions to the OBDii connector wiring have everything you need. The pins we will use are not required or used by OBDii, but manufacturer specific, so don't expect them to be on all other OBDii connectors. Fortunately Porsche has exactly the right wiring on their OBD connector. You can get easier access to the connector by removing the torx screws holding it in place. Pin 1(black/red) is switched power. Don't confuse it with Pin 16 (red/black) which is battery, always hot. The power rating on pin 1 is 5A. Shift-i doesn't rate the power consumption of their device, but a few LED's and a very small logic board, probably 500mA max. Connect this to the red Shift-i wire. Pin 4 (brown) is chassis ground. Don't confuse it with Pin 5 which is signal ground for OBDii! Connect this to the black Shift-i wire. Pin 9 (violet/green) is tach output. Fortunately Porsche provides this for us in such a convenient place! Connect this to the blue Shift-i wire. To route the wires, others had described taking apart the instrument panel and removing some of the ventilation ducting... I opted for a slightly easier approach. Took a heavy-duty 36" zip tie and fed it up from the bottom. It was pretty easy to manipulate it out the steering column opening, then I just taped the Shift-i wires to it and used it as a wire pull. The Shift-i is highly configurable and has many different modes... The way I currently have it set, each LED = 1,000 RPMS. My first four LED's are green (1K-4K RPM), five and six are yellow (which comes on at 5K and 6K RPM, and at 7K RPM, just below actual redline, the red LED comes on and the yellow/red flash quickly as a shift indicator. Again, you can set this up many different ways, but in this config, it really operates as a full range tach as well as a shift light. I think perfect for my needs... Sorry, no pictures of the shift indicator... Will try and get a video of it in operation with 7K shifts. Author pfbz Category Carrera (996) - Mods Submitted 05/05/2013 09:21 PM  
  10. One of the things I missed most about my '82 SC was the great big, super-easy to read VDO tach... And you could index redline at twelve o-clock! Maybe it is better with white or silver faced gauges, but I don't find the tach on my 996 particularly easy to read at a glance or out of my peripheral vision, so I decided to add an LED tach/shift light. I had read some good things about the Ecliptech Shift-i progressive shift indicator, so I decided to give one a try. $183 shipped... Got some time to install it today, so far very happy! I decided to mount it on the stationary part of the steering console. It comes in two versions, flat base or curved base. I ordered the curved base. As it turns out, the flat base might have been a bit easier to install in the spot I finally selected... No worries, I cut a small piece of Kydex and got out the heat gun to make a bracket for my curved shift light. I also used some friction tape to bundle the Shift-i wires into a harness. Closest stuff I've found to what Porsche uses for their harnesses. Wiring is pretty easy. The Shift-i has three wires it needs connected. Switched power (red), ground (black), and a tach signal (blue). I had seen a couple of other installation notes describing taking apart the instrument panel and/or the center console to get power and ground and route the wires... All completely unnecessary. Porsche's manufacturer-specific additions to the OBDii connector wiring have everything you need. The pins we will use are not required or used by OBDii, but manufacturer specific, so don't expect them to be on all other OBDii connectors. Fortunately Porsche has exactly the right wiring on their OBD connector. You can get easier access to the connector by removing the torx screws holding it in place. Pin 1(black/red) is switched power. Don't confuse it with Pin 16 (red/black) which is battery, always hot. The power rating on pin 1 is 5A. Shift-i doesn't rate the power consumption of their device, but a few LED's and a very small logic board, probably 500mA max. Connect this to the red Shift-i wire. Pin 4 (brown) is chassis ground. Don't confuse it with Pin 5 which is signal ground for OBDii! Connect this to the black Shift-i wire. Pin 9 (violet/green) is tach output. Fortunately Porsche provides this for us in such a convenient place! Connect this to the blue Shift-i wire. To route the wires, others had described taking apart the instrument panel and removing some of the ventilation ducting... I opted for a slightly easier approach. Took a heavy-duty 36" zip tie and fed it up from the bottom. It was pretty easy to manipulate it out the steering column opening, then I just taped the Shift-i wires to it and used it as a wire pull. The Shift-i is highly configurable and has many different modes... The way I currently have it set, each LED = 1,000 RPMS. My first four LED's are green (1K-4K RPM), five and six are yellow (which comes on at 5K and 6K RPM, and at 7K RPM, just below actual redline, the red LED comes on and the yellow/red flash quickly as a shift indicator. Again, you can set this up many different ways, but in this config, it really operates as a full range tach as well as a shift light. I think perfect for my needs... Sorry, no pictures of the shift indicator... Will try and get a video of it in operation with 7K shifts.
  11. Just to clarify, my desire is not to interfere with anything other than the constant audible reminder. I don't think it's a legal issue. eg: My F-150 has instructions for turning on/off the audible 'Belt Minder' right in the owners manual. Not any sort of secret, back door, or dealer only procedure, just a sequence of ignition key and buckle/unbuckles. I doubt Ford would be flaunting federal safety laws on their highest volume vehicle year after year... Other Porsche models evidently have relatively easy ways to disable the chimes. I've seen reports of certain buckle/unbuckle sequences working on caymans, and PIWIS working on 997's and 996's, but my service advisor just couldn't find the right screen. Is it also possible that there are different 'permission' levels within PIWIS? Or that different versions of PIWIS added/deleted the capability? At any rate, the thread wasn't meant to be a discussion on the applicability of federal law, just if anybody could confirm: Can a 996 MKII audible seat belt reminder can be disabled with PIWIS? What is the procedure or page to do so? [Nothing obvious in the instrument panel or airbag general sections]
  12. 2004 Carrera 2, US spec. I'd like to disable the obnoxious seat belt chime through the dealer. I had it into the dealer yesterday for a detail, and the dealer didn't have any issues with doing it, but we couldn't get it done. Tech didn't think it was possible on 996's (though I've heard otherwise). Service manager hooked up the computer (PIWIS?) and we looked through various options trying to find anything related, but no luck. Anybody know exactly which sub-menu or function can be used within the dealer computer system to turn off the seat belt warning chimes?? -----Disclaimer---- Yes, I wear my seat belt while driving. No, I don't wear my seat belt when juggling cars around in the garage or driveway. Yes, I'm comfortable with that decision.
  13. Yes... one of the first things I checked out. Thanks for the resource! Seems like there are lots of 'non-approved' variations that are working out quite well for people though.
  14. A few more pics from yesterday... It is working superbly. Get in, turn the key, instant pandora streaming with no swipes, buttons, selections. (click pictures for higher res) OFF. ON.
  15. LOL... I can be a bit compulsive about the details, and in the Porsche tire/wheel world, lots of variables!I poured through countless threads and it drove me crazy when somebody would say "I'm running this tire and it works great" but no mention of offset, so I tried to be very complete in my info.At any rate, I am currently running the 997 Carrera III wheels, stock *997* size tires, 5mm spacer in rear, 5mm spacer in front and it seems to be working out quite well.So far zero complaints from PCM/ABS about the taller rear tires and handling seems to be balanced, but no track days yet. Cosmetically, the taller 40 series rear with the lower offset wheels definitely fills the rear wells much better. Have some H&R's on order that will drop the car a bit more, probably pull the 5mm spacers in the rear and put 14mm spacers in the front and test a bit more.
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