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Tool to remove the oil filter


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I tried to remove the oil filter by hand, but was unsucessfull (almost cut myself..).

Went to Kragen, got a "socket" that said fitted some Porches... well Murphy law stroked and it was not the right one...

Any idiea witch socket I need (beside the Porche one that probably cost 90$ :-) )

Jean

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That was the first one I bought, made by Mann. Then I bought one made by Hazet and I can use a 3/8" extension in the end.

Jean had the rear seal replaced 6 weeks ago, just before his warranty expired. This is his 4th seal. When he was under the car trying to get the filter off he saw oil leaking again. :angry:

post-25-1074606656_thumb.jpg

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I've been looking for the filter wrench as I am due for Oil change, called local dealer, he told me they dont carry oil filter wrenches, even after I gave him the number. Told me the techs just get them off the tool truck. Sounds weird to me! Where do you get the OEM wrench?

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You can order the Mann version from any Porsche dealer. I did 3 years ago. Paid $6.56. Part number is 000 721 920 40. There is one on ebay with a current price of $15.50. http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAP...MEBWA%3AIT&rd=1

I then bought Hazet 2169 13 months ago which I like better for $17.49 from Samstang Sales and they have one on ebay. Some VW/Audi/Mercedes filter housings are the same as ours so it is seldom you see one listed for a Boxster. http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAP...MEBWA%3AIT&rd=1

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You should be able to find the proper sized wrench at any auto parts place or even WalMart for about $4. Most are made of plastic. Ok for the occasional use or if the filter housing was not cranked on too tight. I have seen them break or round off when trying to remove the housing and then I have to get in there with my metal one. If you are going to be doing a lot of filter changes I suggest a metal one.

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I plan on doing them all myself. When I bought the vehicle used, brought it in for inspection and told them to also change the oil. My mouth dropped when I got the $189 oil change bill! I realize there is a lot of oil in this car but...

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  • 3 months later...

I haven't looked at the filter "cup" yet, waiting for my new top to get installed and then I'm going to do all fluids, but wouldn't a regular band filter wrench work on this? They seem to work pretty darn good on any regular filters, and from what I'm hearing/seeing this is no different (on the outside)

Thoughts???

laterz...

rich

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You can use a strap wrench if the cannister is not cranked on very tight. On a few cars I have had to used the metal cup style wrench and a 2 foot breaker bar for leverage to get the cannister off.

Some people torque the cannister when putting it back on. You cannot do that with a strap wrench. But all mechanics I have watched screw it back in by hand. Some of us DIYers also do it by hand. I call it the pickle jar effort.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 year later...
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I was at the Toyota dealer to buy a part to fix my horn. There was a display of filters and wrenches on a shelf. So while the guy was finding my part I found the filter for my truck and the wrench that fit it. The wrench was 74 mm with 14 flutes - same as my Boxster. The brand wrench Toyota had was Vector and it is made of metal.

Never knew the Toyota and Box used the same wrench, as I always used a strap wrench on the Toyota.

When I got home I took my extra aftermarket (made by STP) Toyota filter and tried the 2 wrenches I use for the Box. Both fit.

Now I can use the same wrench on the Box and Toyota....

post-4-1143553031_thumb.jpg

post-4-1143553150_thumb.jpg

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  • 1 month later...
I was at the Toyota dealer to buy a part to fix my horn. There was a display of filters and wrenches on a shelf. So while the guy was finding my part I found the filter for my truck and the wrench that fit it. The wrench was 74 mm with 14 flutes - same as my Boxster. The brand wrench Toyota had was Vector and it is made of metal.

Never knew the Toyota and Box used the same wrench, as I always used a strap wrench on the Toyota.

When I got home I took my extra aftermarket (made by STP) Toyota filter and tried the 2 wrenches I use for the Box. Both fit.

Now I can use the same wrench on the Box and Toyota....

I am yet to attempt an oil change on the Boxster myself. This would be in a couple of days.

But on my other cars, I just wrap a piece of sand paper around my hand and grab and twist the oil filter that way. Works very well every time. Wonder if that would be the case with the Boxster too.

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I am yet to attempt an oil change on the Boxster myself. This would be in a couple of days.

But on my other cars, I just wrap a piece of sand paper around my hand and grab and twist the oil filter that way. Works very well every time. Wonder if that would be the case with the Boxster too.

I seriously doubt it... The Boxster uses a paper filter inside a hard plastic casing with a threaded outside section. A "normal" oil filter essentially uses a metal thread on the centre section right at the middle to secure the filter. Therefore on a normal filter, when you grab the outside you're getting a lot more torque on to the centre section threads, which have smaller threads, and is far more rigid... On the Boxster you get virtually no help, and the thicker threads are a lot tighter. On my Boxster is was impossible to use my hand - I had to use a tool.

However, I'm not sure if maybe it's looser on other Boxsters, but I doubt it. Also, you might be a 300lb body-builder with extreme strength, so you might not have a problem using your hands ;) I used to use my hands on every other car with a normal filter and had no problems either - but, as I said, the Boxster was impossible!

Thanks!

Shash

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I am yet to attempt an oil change on the Boxster myself. This would be in a couple of days.

But on my other cars, I just wrap a piece of sand paper around my hand and grab and twist the oil filter that way. Works very well every time. Wonder if that would be the case with the Boxster too.

I seriously doubt it... The Boxster uses a paper filter inside a hard plastic casing with a threaded outside section. A "normal" oil filter essentially uses a metal thread on the centre section right at the middle to secure the filter. Therefore on a normal filter, when you grab the outside you're getting a lot more torque on to the centre section threads, which have smaller threads, and is far more rigid... On the Boxster you get virtually no help, and the thicker threads are a lot tighter. On my Boxster is was impossible to use my hand - I had to use a tool.

However, I'm not sure if maybe it's looser on other Boxsters, but I doubt it. Also, you might be a 300lb body-builder with extreme strength, so you might not have a problem using your hands ;) I used to use my hands on every other car with a normal filter and had no problems either - but, as I said, the Boxster was impossible!

Thanks!

Shash

Hmm... so all I need is another 150lb of muscle.... I better get started right away or the oil change is never going to happen :)

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

OK. I just have to tell this story. I was once young, broke and eager to do my own oil change in order to save twenty dollars. So I went down to the local auto shop, bought the oil, filter, drain pan and headed home. I backed the car out of the garage at my condo so that is straddled the swale of the driveway gutter and I could easily slide underneath it. I proceeded to remove the drain plug with my rachet and removed all the oil from the car. It went swimmingly and I was very proud of myself.

Until I tried removing the old oil filter. I tried with all my might. I tried everything I could think of the free it. I tried belts, pipe wrenches, everything. But nothing would make it budge. Finally, realizing that I couldn't drive back to the store for a filter wrench I had to leave the car and my project sticking out in the driveway of my complex. I walked to the nearest strip mall that had a grocery and pharmacy type store. I figured the pharmacy may have a wrench since I know the sell oil, windshield fluid and car scent crap and all.

Anyway, they had a filter wrench. I could have kissed the old lady that rang me up. Could have......

I walked home with wrench in hand to my abandoned steed. Quick as a jiffy I slid under the car, slipped on the wrench and freed the filter. Again, swelling with pride.

New filter went on, refilled the engine with the new oil and back into the garage. Success!

Later that evening, I recounted the story to my younger brother. He is a Marine that has worked on amtracks and other military vehicles along with doing just about all of the work on his own vehicles. He laughed at me and asked, "This was the old filter right?" I said, "Yes." He asked if I had a screwdriver. To which I said, "Of course." He told me that next time I should just shove the screwdriver through one side of the filter and out the other, then twist.

Needless to say, I felt like an idiot. I actually used the method the next time I did an oil change. And it was a hell of a lot easier than trying to get the filter wrench to work.

Of course this won't work on Porsches but it's a funny story and I like telling it. I hope you enjoyed it too.

Later,

-pvaughan

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