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troysm123

break in

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Just bought a 997TT. The manual indicates you need to break in the engine during the first 2,000 miles... The service manager said that the engine comes broke in from the factory...... any thoughts.. I really want to drive this now.

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Just bought a 997TT. The manual indicates you need to break in the engine during the first 2,000 miles... The service manager said that the engine comes broke in from the factory...... any thoughts.. I really want to drive this now.

Thanks for the input.... :)

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Just bought a 997TT. The manual indicates you need to break in the engine during the first 2,000 miles... The service manager said that the engine comes broke in from the factory...... any thoughts.. I really want to drive this now.

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I agree with following the manual - the engineers who wrote it know WAY more than the service guy who frankly could have been sitting behind the counter at a Ford dealership last week - or even the applicance store. I now have 2200 miles on my 997 TT and I followed the guidance to keep it under 4200 RPMs for 2000 miles. Trust me - you can have plenty of fun with this car following that guidance. It is an amazingly fast and capable car - take the 2000 miles to really know how to drive it before you push the 'happy button' (sport chrono/overboost!!)

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I agree with following the manual - the engineers who wrote it know WAY more than the service guy who frankly could have been sitting behind the counter at a Ford dealership last week - or even the applicance store. I now have 2200 miles on my 997 TT and I followed the guidance to keep it under 4200 RPMs for 2000 miles. Trust me - you can have plenty of fun with this car following that guidance. It is an amazingly fast and capable car - take the 2000 miles to really know how to drive it before you push the 'happy button' (sport chrono/overboost!!)

I really want to hit the "happy button" thanks for the input

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I have just over 5k on mine but have been winding it up pretty hard for the last 2.5, including a day of AutoX. I've had two oil changes so far. I'm guessing once I'm past the 2k mark, I'm good to go?

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Just bought a 997TT. The manual indicates you need to break in the engine during the first 2,000 miles... The service manager said that the engine comes broke in from the factory...... any thoughts.. I really want to drive this now.

I have solicited many opinions from Porsche race engine builders to Porsche dealership mechanics on this point.

Everyone I have spoken to seem to say "drive it the way you will be using it." To which the dealership mechanic added " if it's going to break, it'll break." My thoughts on this comment might lead me to believe Porsche wants their cars "broken in" at a lesser load, perhaps to mitigate the damage (and their responsibility) in the event something is not quite right from the factory. But that is speculation on my part.

The dealership mechanic also mentioned that these cars are routinely checked at both factory and dealership "at redline" before they are delivered.

One other comment this older and experienced dealership mechanic added is that since these cas are delivered with synthetic oil, they can benefit from a more robust break in. It seems by comparison that conventional oil allows the parts to take a cut, which seals rings, etc. properly. To that point, my race engine builder emphasizes that his engines must be broken in with conventional oil before switching to synthetic. His comment echoed that of the dealership, - synthetic will simply polish the mechanicals before any break in occurs, not allowing the rings to seal. However, he does perform a dyno "break in" before delivery and I'm not sure what procesure he follows except that I do know he uses conventional oil.

It would be interesting to find out if anyone knows or can get information on what Porsche does at the factory to their engines.

One thing I have heard repeatedly which seem important: Do not run the engine at a steady rpm for an extended period of time, for example on a long highway trip. Lots of variety in terms of shifting and changing rpms seems to be a key to proper break in.

Another thing I do with every new car (not just Porsche) is change the oil at 2k miles to flush any possible manufacturing reminants early on.

I babied my RS for the first 1200 miles, but have taken it up to 7000 since then. It won't see redline until 2K miles.

PS - I would concur that breakin is likely more critical to a tubo'd engine.

Edited by lbp

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Just bought a 997TT. The manual indicates you need to break in the engine during the first 2,000 miles... The service manager said that the engine comes broke in from the factory...... any thoughts.. I really want to drive this now.

I have solicited many opinions from Porsche race engine builders to Porsche dealership mechanics on this point.

Everyone I have spoken to seem to say "drive it the way you will be using it." To which the dealership mechanic added " if it's going to break, it'll break." My thoughts on this comment might lead me to believe Porsche wants their cars "broken in" at a lesser load, perhaps to mitigate the damage (and their responsibility) in the event something is not quite right from the factory. But that is speculation on my part.

The dealership mechanic also mentioned that these cars are routinely checked at both factory and dealership "at redline" before they are delivered.

One other comment this older and experienced dealership mechanic added is that since these cas are delivered with synthetic oil, they can benefit from a more robust break in. It seems by comparison that conventional oil allows the parts to take a cut, which seals rings, etc. properly. To that point, my race engine builder emphasizes that his engines must be broken in with conventional oil before switching to synthetic. His comment echoed that of the dealership, - synthetic will simply polish the mechanicals before any break in occurs, not allowing the rings to seal. However, he does perform a dyno "break in" before delivery and I'm not sure what procesure he follows except that I do know he uses conventional oil.

It would be interesting to find out if anyone knows or can get information on what Porsche does at the factory to their engines.

One thing I have heard repeatedly which seem important: Do not run the engine at a steady rpm for an extended period of time, for example on a long highway trip. Lots of variety in terms of shifting and changing rpms seems to be a key to proper break in.

Another thing I do with every new car (not just Porsche) is change the oil at 2k miles to flush any possible manufacturing reminants early on.

I babied my RS for the first 1200 miles, but have taken it up to 7000 since then. It won't see redline until 2K miles.

PS - I would concur that breakin is likely more critical to a tubo'd engine.

Intersting link:

Break in link

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Of course they spin the engine up at the factory. That doesn't mean that you should hammer the engine on the street. Take a nice long road trip. Makes keeping the revs down easier and is a better break in anyway. There is a lot that needs to loosen up. Get it aligned after the break in. They are never spot on from the factory.

Interesting comment from LBP.. With older cars you absolutely had to change the oil after break in. Sometimes the even the break-in oil was different. Not any more. Modern cars are designed for minimal service. I am amazed at how little is called for at the even the major service intervals. Essentially nothing. But I'm old fashioned - and like LBP feel better about changing the oil etc after break in.

I got an MB a few years ago. The dealer absolutely refused to change the oil. Said it wasn't necessary. I told him I didn't care, I would cheerfully pay for it. He still refused. Idiot.. So - I found a new dealer. They asked me one question: Did I own or lease the car?

Thats your answer to break-in and oil change. Its your car. Be patient.

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