Jump to content

Server Lease Renewal/Software Licenses

Our yearly server lease, software licenses, as well as hardware operating costs, ARE due Dec 6th, 2021. Our current donations have fallen far short of the funds we need to renew. Please remember the RennTech.org community is Member supported so please consider a donation to help...  THANK YOU!

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

DIY Upgraded Ignition Switch/Lock Installation for 996/Boxster


Recommended Posts

Is there a TSB covering this ignition switch/lock replacement by the newer part?

Replacement is covered in the service manual - which is what dmcole used.

To Loren and others,,,,your opinion, please,,,,,,,,

I have read all the posts in this regard and appreciate them,,,,,my problem is that i have already replaced the ignition switch on my '99 996 with Porsche part #4A0 905 849 B and my issue persists,,,ie. which is that I hear a delayed clicking sound anywhere from a few seconds to a minute or so after i remove the key from the cylinder,,,the time delay seems to be a factor of temperture,,the colder it is, the longer the delay before the 'click,,,it sounds like the (a) tumbler falling into place,,,I have now, yesterday, also began experiencing the key becoming difficult to remove,,,do you believe I may either/also have a problem with the cylnder itself, or does this still seem like the switch?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I had the same identical problem. I replaced the electrical portion of the switch and there was no improvement. I tried all manners of cleaning and lubrication and was able to only slightly improve the behavior but never to my satisfaction. Eventually, I replaced the cylinder and the problem is now 100% solved.

I got the updated part from Suncoast Porsche for $119 (http://www.e-partssales.com/miva/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=P&Product_Code=99634701707)

I have read all the posts in this regard and appreciate them,,,,,my problem is that i have already replaced the ignition switch on my '99 996 with Porsche part #4A0 905 849 B and my issue persists,,,ie. which is that I hear a delayed clicking sound anywhere from a few seconds to a minute or so after i remove the key from the cylinder,,,the time delay seems to be a factor of temperture,,the colder it is, the longer the delay before the 'click,,,it sounds like the (a) tumbler falling into place,,,I have now, yesterday, also began experiencing the key becoming difficult to remove,,,do you believe I may either/also have a problem with the cylnder itself, or does this still seem like the switch?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...
  • 4 months later...

Already replaced the switch once and couldn't believe the very next year the same problem. So I decided to go for the upgrade but left it to the garage (not Porsche) from where I bought the car.

£135 all in. :thumbup:

For that price screw DIY! :oops:

Added benefit if something goes array or it fails again in an unreasonable time it's their problem and not mine. :cheers: :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Hello All,

I recently felt a snap in the ignition while starting the car. Now the key does not fully engage the zero position and the car thinks the key is in even when it is not. Is this fixed by replacing the key cylinder or does it require the whole assembly.

Thanks

**Please ignore this post I found the answer in one of the links.**

So far, I have not found the answer you did. So, what's the deal?

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

My recently acquired 97 boxster (40K miles) came with an ignition switch which was consistently notchy going from 0 to 1. A few times it would not budge. Jiggling the steering wheel and key became tiresome. Never saw any electronic misbehaviour.

First, I went under the dash and pulled the electric switch. Part number was 4A0 905 849 B and obviously had been replaced in the past.

With the electric switch disconnected the key still resisted going from 0 to 1, but only after the key was pulled out. If the key stayed in the tumbler there was no notchiness. I concluded that the steering lock disengagement was the culprit.

Next day I pulled the left side vent and instrument cluster to remove the steering lock. The instrument cluster took 10 minutes and fully exposed the work area - (hats off to those who succeeded thru the vent hole alone). Once the lock assembly was on the bench, why not take it apart before ordering a new one.

There is a square plate crimped in by the aluminum casting. It can be carefully pryed out to expose the steering lock disengagement cam.

post-61773-0-10670300-1306984106_thumb.j

With the tumbler and electric switch off, using a screw driver to simulate the key and with one thumb standing in for the spring, I easily duplicated the original notchiness. Maybe it's no surprise with this mechanism's many rotational and longtudinal friction points, endless mechanical gyrations and tight tolerances.

I intended to remove the circlip from the tumbler end and strip out the locking plunger, thus leaving the car without steering lock. With encoded keys who needs the steering lock function?

However, laying down some molybdenum EP grease on the cam totally eliminated the notchiness. I then sprayed in some McLube (or use Jigaloo) and closed up the gizmo.

For now problem solved - cost zero. If it acts up again somewhere down the road, I'll pull the plunger.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for the directions (and for those who posted pictures, which really helped).

In my case I was just replacing the switch, but one of the set screws was stuck so I ended up pulling the whole lock assembly to get at it (yes, I wish I had just ordered the whole lock assembly and replaced it).

My suggested improvements to the directions:

  1. First, as others have suggested, go ahead and take off the instrument cluster: I used these directions. It makes things much easier to be able to get in from above.
    • Once you get the cluster off the there is a cowl around the column you have to remove: first remove the two Torx screws; then it's not entirely clear what the right procedure is, but I was able to rotate the cowl 90 degrees and then it flexed enough to come off of the column.

[*]Removing the key cylinder was the hardest part for me, probably because I didn't know where the number 1 position was. Turn the key as far as it will go before you would be starting the car. Then the paperclip should go in a couple of inches. Once you get the key in the right place, the paper clip goes in without too much effort. (I suspect some people may be having problems because their switch is broken and the key is not catching in the normal positions; I suggest just keep turning the key and trying the paper clip.)[*]Reading the directions, I though the silver spring button to release the lock from the column was tiny. It's about the size of a pencil eraser. If you remove the instrument cluster, it (as well as the 10mm bolt) are easy to get at.[*]Reassembly - I also had no problem getting the housing into the steering column.[*]Before you put the key cylinder back in, reconnect its wiring harness. It is much easier to do before you put it back in. I ended up taking it back out, plugging in the harness and then re-installing the cylinder.[*]Getting the key cylinder back in was a little tricky. There are three things that have to line up: (1) the receptacle for the electrical harness and the slot it fits into, (2) the tab on the back of the cylinder (that turns with the key) and the corresponding slot it fits into, and (3) a blue rim on the back of the cylinder and the slot it fits into. The receptacle and the blue rim are fixed, so you need to turn the key to align the tab with its slot; look in the lock and notice the position of the slot the tab fits into and turn the key so all three things line up.

  • If you pull out the paper clip and the cylinder doesn't catch, don't worry, with the cylinder out, it's easy to get the paper clip in and try again. About halfway down the side of the cylinder is a spring loaded tab that sticks out. The tab has a hole on one end, which is what the paper clip goes into to hold it in, allowing the cylinder to be removed/inserted. Squeeze the tab back in, turn the key to the right position and the paper clip goes in easily.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really like the additional comments by VWEICH. Great job! :beer:

Thanks for the directions (and for those who posted pictures, which really helped).

In my case I was just replacing the switch, but one of the set screws was stuck so I ended up pulling the whole lock assembly to get at it (yes, I wish I had just ordered the whole lock assembly and replaced it).

My suggested improvements to the directions:

  1. First, as others have suggested, go ahead and take off the instrument cluster: I used these directions. It makes things much easier to be able to get in from above.
    • Once you get the cluster off the there is a cowl around the column you have to remove: first remove the two Torx screws; then it's not entirely clear what the right procedure is, but I was able to rotate the cowl 90 degrees and then it flexed enough to come off of the column.

Removing the key cylinder was the hardest part for me, probably because I didn't know where the number 1 position was. Turn the key as far as it will go before you would be starting the car. Then the paperclip should go in a couple of inches. Once you get the key in the right place, the paper clip goes in without too much effort. (I suspect some people may be having problems because their switch is broken and the key is not catching in the normal positions; I suggest just keep turning the key and trying the paper clip.)<LI>Reading the directions, I though the silver spring button to release the lock from the column was tiny. It's about the size of a pencil eraser. If you remove the instrument cluster, it (as well as the 10mm bolt) are easy to get at.<LI>Reassembly - I also had no problem getting the housing into the steering column.<LI>Before you put the key cylinder back in, reconnect its wiring harness. It is much easier to do before you put it back in. I ended up taking it back out, plugging in the harness and then re-installing the cylinder.<LI>Getting the key cylinder back in was a little tricky. There are three things that have to line up: (1) the receptacle for the electrical harness and the slot it fits into, (2) the tab on the back of the cylinder (that turns with the key) and the corresponding slot it fits into, and (3) a blue rim on the back of the cylinder and the slot it fits into. The receptacle and the blue rim are fixed, so you need to turn the key to align the tab with its slot; look in the lock and notice the position of the slot the tab fits into and turn the key so all three things line up.

  • If you pull out the paper clip and the cylinder doesn't catch, don't worry, with the cylinder out, it's easy to get the paper clip in and try again. About halfway down the side of the cylinder is a spring loaded tab that sticks out. The tab has a hole on one end, which is what the paper clip goes into to hold it in, allowing the cylinder to be removed/inserted. Squeeze the tab back in, turn the key to the right position and the paper clip goes in easily.

Edited by kbrandsma
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Hello, I think the ignition switch/lock issue is my problem but I need a little confirmation before going this route.

I had just replaced my water pump and had to leave town after it was completed. When I came back the Porsche Boxster 1998 was dead. I immediately thought the battery was dead, so I took a reading to confirm it, and put my handy dandy charger on it. It took a long time to charge it even though the batter is only about 1.5 years old. I started the car up and ran it for a while, took it up to the store and everything appeared fine, except for the locking mechanism. I had to insert the key into the door instead of locking it with the button on the key. When locking it at the door the alarm would beep also. The next day I came out to use the car and it was dead again. I went through the whole procedure again. However, the following day it worked except that I had to use the key in the door to lock it. It worked again the following day the same way. The third day it was dead again.

I have noticed over the months that sometimes it is extremely difficult to insert the key into the ignition, but if I go to the door and lock and unlock the door, then the key will go into the ignition usually. Sometimes I have to just lock and unlock the door a couple of times before the ignition will accept the key.

1. Do you think that I need to replace the ignition?

2. What part(s) do I need to order?

3. Do I have to get my key reprogrammed or get a new key?

Thanks for your help!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

I am so glad I found this thread. My symptoms would not be solved by just replacing the ignition switch. I have the

switch, part # 100 905 0000. Ref. No. 4A0 905 849 B. I am going to purchase the whole cylinder lock assembly and use

this DIY tutorial. Great write-up!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
  • 10 months later...

GREAT DIY - Replace my lock and switch assembly over the weekend. I went the removal of the instrument cluster route, and concur the time to remove is worth it. In addition, one gets so much more room to work. A big thanks to all who added to this DIY, I for one certainly benfited from your learnings!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Great how to. I took off the instrument cluster to better get to the 10mm bolt. It's held on with 2 screws, one behind the hazard switch, and one behind the small circular screen on the far left of the cluster. I had a lot of trouble getting the key cylinder back in. I had to use a bit of force pressing it in, for it to finally lock back in (it'll make a small click sound). Sunset has the assembly (lock and switch) for $138 now, part #996-347-017-07.

Edited by kpl
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 years later...

I know this is an old thread but I just wanted to add that I recently replaced the electronic portion of my ignition switch due to signs of impending failure. While I was working on it I sprayed some MAF cleaner in the lock cylinder, cycled the key in and out and through a few roatations and that immediately freed up my stuck steering lock and improved my ignition’s rotational feel. Put the new switch in and now everything works like new. My suspicion is that the PO used a “lubricant” like WD40 to ease the stiffening ignition switch which had the effect of attracting grime that siezed up the steering lock and ended up making the ignition rotation even stiffer over time. So, maybe a good cleaning is all that is needed on some of these cars?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Has any had an issue with the spring button in the assembly? I have full access to it but no matter how hard I press on it, there is no give and it will not release.  

 

Well I just solved the issue. The button only depresses if the column is unlocked. So if you leave the key cylinder in and intend to remove it after the assembly is out, you need to turn the key to unlock the cylinder

 

Edited by TargaNero
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

This thread was a big help but I have a few pointers to add after changing out the lock assembly today. 

 

1. As with others on here, I recommend removing the instrument gauge pod to give yourself more access. But you also need to make sure that you extend the steering wheel all of the way aft towards the seat. This is the only way that I could figure out that gave me enough room to access the area behind the steering wheel (due to the lower plastic shielding that is loose but not able to be completely removed). 

 

2. I used needle nose vice grips to hold on to the open end of a 10mm wrench to loosen/tighten the nut on the 10mm bolt. I used the box end of the wrench to securely hold the 10mm nut in place. 

 

3. The electronic wiring that connects to the ignition assembly is both purple and black. The purple doesn't separate from the black in order to remove the wire harness. The black portion is what detaches from the rear of the ignition assembly. 

 

4. When reinstalling the left dash vent, make sure the vent dial is "Up" (open). If you try to reinstall this assembly with the dial "down" (closed), the lever arm on the left side of the assembly will be in the way of the dash structure and it won't allow it to fit in. 

 

5. I too removed the inner (silver) light switch mechanism from the left vent assembly before attempting to reinstall the vent. You'll need a 24mm socket or similar in order to remove the large nut that retains the switch to the vent assembly. I'm not sure that removing this mechanism from the vent assembly was totally necessary so your mileage may vary. 

 

6. Lastly, my ignition key pinhole was at the 1 o'clock position like others on here. After installing the new ignition mechanism, I was unable to get my key to turn on the ignition of the car when I reinstalled it with the pinhole at the 7 o'clock position. I don't know what the issue was, but it worked perfectly when I changed it back to the 1 o'clock position again. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.