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Depends on what was in the car.

If the old sensor is 986.606.125.01 then yes. If the old sensor 98660612400 then you will need to have the DME re-programmed for the new sensor.

There is a TSB on this.

How can I tell which sensor is currently in my car? Is there a way based on VIN# or must I pull out the old sensor to find out? Is the part# stamped on the MAF sensor? When I took it out last month to clean it I don't recall seeing a part#.

thanks,

David

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Depends on what was in the car.

If the old sensor is 986.606.125.01 then yes. If the old sensor 98660612400 then you will need to have the DME re-programmed for the new sensor.

There is a TSB on this.

How can I tell which sensor is currently in my car? Is there a way based on VIN# or must I pull out the old sensor to find out? Is the part# stamped on the MAF sensor? When I took it out last month to clean it I don't recall seeing a part#.

thanks,

David

Unfortunately your car could have either or may not have been updated.

So yes, get the part number off the sensor.

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Depends on what was in the car.

If the old sensor is 986.606.125.01 then yes. If the old sensor 98660612400 then you will need to have the DME re-programmed for the new sensor.

There is a TSB on this.

How can I tell which sensor is currently in my car? Is there a way based on VIN# or must I pull out the old sensor to find out? Is the part# stamped on the MAF sensor? When I took it out last month to clean it I don't recall seeing a part#.

thanks,

David

Unfortunately your car could have either or may not have been updated.

So yes, get the part number off the sensor.

I got the part# (98660612500) and I believe it's the old version. Is the TSB for the new version available online? I want to know if it's worth $800 to upgrade to the new version. I can get the old version MAF for $300 and install it myself in 30 minutes. Dealer wants $1100 to replace the MAF and reprogram the ECU. Your thoughts?

Thanks,

David

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Depends on what was in the car.

If the old sensor is 986.606.125.01 then yes. If the old sensor 98660612400 then you will need to have the DME re-programmed for the new sensor.

There is a TSB on this.

How can I tell which sensor is currently in my car? Is there a way based on VIN# or must I pull out the old sensor to find out? Is the part# stamped on the MAF sensor? When I took it out last month to clean it I don't recall seeing a part#.

thanks,

David

Unfortunately your car could have either or may not have been updated.

So yes, get the part number off the sensor.

I got the part# (98660612500) and I believe it's the old version. Is the TSB for the new version available online? I want to know if it's worth $800 to upgrade to the new version. I can get the old version MAF for $300 and install it myself in 30 minutes. Dealer wants $1100 to replace the MAF and reprogram the ECU. Your thoughts?

Thanks,

David

986.606.125.00 is not current anyway - it was replaced by 986.606.125.01

The newer design sensor is more resistant to fouling from dirt.

Dealer price is WAY too high - I suggest you find a different dealer or independent shop with a PST or PIWIS tester.

All the TSBs are available here to our Contributing Members.

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Depends on what was in the car.

If the old sensor is 986.606.125.01 then yes. If the old sensor 98660612400 then you will need to have the DME re-programmed for the new sensor.

There is a TSB on this.

How can I tell which sensor is currently in my car? Is there a way based on VIN# or must I pull out the old sensor to find out? Is the part# stamped on the MAF sensor? When I took it out last month to clean it I don't recall seeing a part#.

thanks,

David

Unfortunately your car could have either or may not have been updated.

So yes, get the part number off the sensor.

I got the part# (98660612500) and I believe it's the old version. Is the TSB for the new version available online? I want to know if it's worth $800 to upgrade to the new version. I can get the old version MAF for $300 and install it myself in 30 minutes. Dealer wants $1100 to replace the MAF and reprogram the ECU. Your thoughts?

Thanks,

David

986.606.125.00 is not current anyway - it was replaced by 986.606.125.01

The newer design sensor is more resistant to fouling from dirt.

Dealer price is WAY too high - I suggest you find a different dealer or independent shop with a PST or PIWIS tester.

All the TSBs are available here to our Contributing Members.

I called a local dealer and he said they don't have 986.606.125.00 and it's no longer available. If I recall it's possible to buy a Porsche OEM MAF from Bosch since they're made by Bosch. Anyone have the equivalent Bosch part# and a web site where I can buy the Bosch part? Probably cheaper too.

BTW, how do I access the TSBs? I couldn't find them.

thanks,

David

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I called a local dealer and he said they don't have 986.606.125.00 and it's no longer available. If I recall it's possible to buy a Porsche OEM MAF from Bosch since they're made by Bosch. Anyone have the equivalent Bosch part# and a web site where I can buy the Bosch part? Probably cheaper too.

BTW, how do I access the TSBs? I couldn't find them.

thanks,

David

David:

You must become a Contributing Member in order to have access to the TSB's.

You can then find the TSB's under the pull-down menu with the heading "DIY Menu" near the top left of every page.

Regards, Maurice.

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I went through the same thing with my '01 base Boxster - see here. Sunset in Oregon (renntech sponsor with link at the top of the page) had a great price on the Porsche MAF. Mike Focke's MAF page has all the details you need on parts and installation. Get the current version of the MAF from them, there's absolutely no reason to use the older part number. eBay is probably the worst place to buy an MAF, since you don't know what you're getting. I'm mechanically spastic, but didn't break anything replacing the MAF, and getting to the engine is the most complex part of the job. You don't need the TSB to replace the MAF, but becoming a contributing member is without a doubt the best investment you can make in your Boxster.

Based on what I've experienced and read here and elsewhere, if you need to replace the MAF on an '01 Boxster and your car has around 50K miles, give or take, you will probably need to clean your throttle body in the next year or so to solve a rough idle problem (if you haven't cleaned it already). Probably coincidence due to the mileage, since the two items aren't mechanically related

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I went through the same thing with my '01 base Boxster - see here. Sunset in Oregon (renntech sponsor with link at the top of the page) had a great price on the Porsche MAF. Mike Focke's MAF page has all the details you need on parts and installation. Get the current version of the MAF from them, there's absolutely no reason to use the older part number. eBay is probably the worst place to buy an MAF, since you don't know what you're getting. I'm mechanically spastic, but didn't break anything replacing the MAF, and getting to the engine is the most complex part of the job. You don't need the TSB to replace the MAF, but becoming a contributing member is without a doubt the best investment you can make in your Boxster.

Based on what I've experienced and read here and elsewhere, if you need to replace the MAF on an '01 Boxster and your car has around 50K miles, give or take, you will probably need to clean your throttle body in the next year or so to solve a rough idle problem (if you haven't cleaned it already). Probably coincidence due to the mileage, since the two items aren't mechanically related

Thanks for your post. My experience was pretty close to yours, except I got the P1128 code in addition to P1130. And guest what, I have almost 51,000 miles. I cleaned the MAF again when I got the part# in case the same codes come back and I need to replace the MAF. The reason I want to get the older MAF version is so I don't have to pay $700 (not including parts, they want $400 for the new version of the MAF) to the dealer to install the new MAF, clean throttle body, and reprogram the ECU. If I just buy the older MAF version online for $300 I can do it myself without reprogramming the ECU in 20 minutes. Why pay $1100 when I can pay $300? The Problem now is I'm having problems finding a source for the old version of the MAF (part#986 606 125 00).

Edited by DavidSF
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Thanks for your post. My experience was pretty close to yours, except I got the P1128 code in addition to P1130. And guest what, I have almost 51,000 miles. I cleaned the MAF again when I got the part# in case the same codes come back and I need to replace the MAF. The reason I want to get the older MAF version is so I don't have to pay $700 (not including parts, they want $400 for the new version of the MAF) to the dealer to install the new MAF, clean throttle body, and reprogram the ECU. If I just buy the older MAF version online for $300 I can do it myself without reprogramming the ECU in 20 minutes. Why pay $1100 when I can pay $300? The Problem now is I'm having problems finding a source for the old version of the MAF (part#986 606 125 00).

If you go from 996.606.125.00 to 986.606.125.01, you don't need to have the ECU reprogrammed, only if you have an earlier MAF (the 124 flavor). These were the before and after parts for me. However, you should disconnect your battery for 5 minutes after replacing the MAF (make sure you have the radio code first), so the DME will relearn the MAF parameters. The 125.00 and 125.01 seem to be electrically the same, but the .01 version is less susceptible to getting dirty and fouling (or so I've read). I've never heard of any advantage of using the older style MAF sensor. The TSB referenced above talks about above says the 124 MAF needs to have the ECU reprogrammed when going to the 125, but it came out before the 125.01 issue of the MAF (if you were a contributing member, you could read the whole TSB and be as confused as everyone else!) If your dealer is trying to sell you an ECU reprogramming going from the 125.00 to the 125.01, you can politely set them straight.

You will need the security torx to get the MAF sensor on and off. It takes several reads of Mike Focke's instructions for everything to sink in - there's a lot of information there.

Ask more questions here if you get stuck. After doing the first MAF replacement, the second one from start to finish should take less than 30 minutes. If you do the job, it will take longer because you will probably want to clean some of the dirt in the engine compartment that has accumulated in 50K miles; the dealers don't seem to wipe down the dirt that accumulates in general.

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Thanks for your post. My experience was pretty close to yours, except I got the P1128 code in addition to P1130. And guest what, I have almost 51,000 miles. I cleaned the MAF again when I got the part# in case the same codes come back and I need to replace the MAF. The reason I want to get the older MAF version is so I don't have to pay $700 (not including parts, they want $400 for the new version of the MAF) to the dealer to install the new MAF, clean throttle body, and reprogram the ECU. If I just buy the older MAF version online for $300 I can do it myself without reprogramming the ECU in 20 minutes. Why pay $1100 when I can pay $300? The Problem now is I'm having problems finding a source for the old version of the MAF (part#986 606 125 00).

If you go from 996.606.125.00 to 986.606.125.01, you don't need to have the ECU reprogrammed, only if you have an earlier MAF (the 124 flavor). These were the before and after parts for me. However, you should disconnect your battery for 5 minutes after replacing the MAF (make sure you have the radio code first), so the DME will relearn the MAF parameters. The 125.00 and 125.01 seem to be electrically the same, but the .01 version is less susceptible to getting dirty and fouling (or so I've read). I've never heard of any advantage of using the older style MAF sensor. The TSB referenced above talks about above says the 124 MAF needs to have the ECU reprogrammed when going to the 125, but it came out before the 125.01 issue of the MAF (if you were a contributing member, you could read the whole TSB and be as confused as everyone else!) If your dealer is trying to sell you an ECU reprogramming going from the 125.00 to the 125.01, you can politely set them straight.

You will need the security torx to get the MAF sensor on and off. It takes several reads of Mike Focke's instructions for everything to sink in - there's a lot of information there.

Ask more questions here if you get stuck. After doing the first MAF replacement, the second one from start to finish should take less than 30 minutes. If you do the job, it will take longer because you will probably want to clean some of the dirt in the engine compartment that has accumulated in 50K miles; the dealers don't seem to wipe down the dirt that accumulates in general.

I assume you meant to type going from 986.606.125.00 to 986.606.125.01. Man I'm so confused. :) I don't know who to believe or what to do since I've gotten conflicting information. I'm going to try to confirm with other sources like PPBB and see if others can confirm no ECU reprogramming is needed. Thanks!

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Going from 986.606.125.00 to 986.606.125.01 is not a problem. If you had the earlier 124 MAF then reprogramming of the DME is required to use the newer 125.00 and 125.01 MAF.

Do I need to disconnect my battery for 5 min?

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Going from 986.606.125.00 to 986.606.125.01 is not a problem. If you had the earlier 124 MAF then reprogramming of the DME is required to use the newer 125.00 and 125.01 MAF.

Do I need to disconnect my battery for 5 min?

Which MAF was in your car and what is your new MAF?

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Going from 986.606.125.00 to 986.606.125.01 is not a problem. If you had the earlier 124 MAF then reprogramming of the DME is required to use the newer 125.00 and 125.01 MAF.

Do I need to disconnect my battery for 5 min?

Which MAF was in your car and what is your new MAF?

OLD MAF=986.606.125.00

NEW MAF=986.606.125.01

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Going from 986.606.125.00 to 986.606.125.01 is not a problem. If you had the earlier 124 MAF then reprogramming of the DME is required to use the newer 125.00 and 125.01 MAF.

Do I need to disconnect my battery for 5 min?

Which MAF was in your car and what is your new MAF?

OLD MAF=986.606.125.00

NEW MAF=986.606.125.01

Then all you need to do is disconnect the battery for about 5 minutes.

When you start the car will run rough for a few minutes until the DME learns the new MAF. You will need to drive the car at least 5 to 10 miles to get the DME to re-learn your driving style.

Once that is done the car should idle and run normally.

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Going from 986.606.125.00 to 986.606.125.01 is not a problem. If you had the earlier 124 MAF then reprogramming of the DME is required to use the newer 125.00 and 125.01 MAF.

Do I need to disconnect my battery for 5 min?

Which MAF was in your car and what is your new MAF?

OLD MAF=986.606.125.00

NEW MAF=986.606.125.01

Then all you need to do is disconnect the battery for about 5 minutes.

When you start the car will run rough for a few minutes until the DME learns the new MAF. You will need to drive the car at least 5 to 10 miles to get the DME to re-learn your driving style.

Once that is done the car should idle and run normally.

Awesome, thanks. One last question on this topic: is it safer to disconnect the positive or negative terminal of the battery or do I need to disconnect both?

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Going from 986.606.125.00 to 986.606.125.01 is not a problem. If you had the earlier 124 MAF then reprogramming of the DME is required to use the newer 125.00 and 125.01 MAF.

Do I need to disconnect my battery for 5 min?

Which MAF was in your car and what is your new MAF?

OLD MAF=986.606.125.00

NEW MAF=986.606.125.01

Then all you need to do is disconnect the battery for about 5 minutes.

When you start the car will run rough for a few minutes until the DME learns the new MAF. You will need to drive the car at least 5 to 10 miles to get the DME to re-learn your driving style.

Once that is done the car should idle and run normally.

Awesome, thanks. One last question on this topic: is it safer to disconnect the positive or negative terminal of the battery or do I need to disconnect both?

I usually disconnect the positive.

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Awesome, thanks. One last question on this topic: is it safer to disconnect the positive or negative terminal of the battery or do I need to disconnect both?

I usually disconnect the positive.

I don't mean to sound like I have more experience than Loren working with cars (I don't :-), and I realize the question is about disconnecting one terminal, not both, but I thought I should point out that if you are disconnecting the battery completely, it is safer to do the negative first.

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Awesome, thanks. One last question on this topic: is it safer to disconnect the positive or negative terminal of the battery or do I need to disconnect both?

I usually disconnect the positive.

I don't mean to sound like I have more experience than Loren working with cars (I don't :-), and I realize the question is about disconnecting one terminal, not both, but I thought I should point out that if you are disconnecting the battery completely, it is safer to do the negative first.

;) I am just very careful.
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