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KPC_Boxster

New Member Intro coming from an Audi

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Hi everyone,

My name is Kurt. I currently have an 03 Audi 1.8T quattro, but there is a good possibility I will be moving to a much warmer climate for the next few years and I am starting to seriously look at the 986 Boxster. I'm 25 years old and will be moving down to the Miami area to finish my medical degree. I belong to a very involved Audi forum at audizine.com so I knew that before posting here I should spend some time and look around through the posts to get my own information before I started asking questions. Here is where I'm at now...

1) What is the maintenance like on a boxster? I like to turn my own wrenches on my Audi and consider myself fairly adept at keeping her in top running order. I'm a firm believer that sticking to scheduled maintenance will keep the car running longer and in better shape.

2) How reliable are the 2003 cars and at what mileage do the typical problems start to show up?

3) I am big in to modding my Audi for both performance and appearance and if I do get a boxster, she will not stay stock for long. I know that a lot of Audi tuners also work on Porsche, but what is the modding scene like for these cars?

I look forward to being a very active member of this community, and I hope to talk to a lot of you.

Here is a link to my Audi page so you can get a feel for where I'm coming from. Story of my 03 A4 1.8T

Cheers!

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:welcome:

Here is alink to get you started on appearence mods.

http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php?s...oxster+body+kit

Do search in the search box for other threads for performance and such for Boxsters.

Thanks for the welcome, I'm happy to be here. I have been spending a lot of time using the search option. I tell people on my Audi forum to use the search feature all the time. Anyway, I was wondering if someone could help out with some of the questions in my last post. Maintenance, mileage, common issues, what to look out for, etc

Thanks.

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Hi everyone,

My name is Kurt. I currently have an 03 Audi 1.8T quattro, but there is a good possibility I will be moving to a much warmer climate for the next few years and I am starting to seriously look at the 986 Boxster. I'm 25 years old and will be moving down to the Miami area to finish my medical degree. I belong to a very involved Audi forum at audizine.com so I knew that before posting here I should spend some time and look around through the posts to get my own information before I started asking questions. Here is where I'm at now...

1) What is the maintenance like on a boxster? I like to turn my own wrenches on my Audi and consider myself fairly adept at keeping her in top running order. I'm a firm believer that sticking to scheduled maintenance will keep the car running longer and in better shape.

2) How reliable are the 2003 cars and at what mileage do the typical problems start to show up?

3) I am big in to modding my Audi for both performance and appearance and if I do get a boxster, she will not stay stock for long. I know that a lot of Audi tuners also work on Porsche, but what is the modding scene like for these cars?

I look forward to being a very active member of this community, and I hope to talk to a lot of you.

Here is a link to my Audi page so you can get a feel for where I'm coming from. Story of my 03 A4 1.8T

Cheers!

What's the maintenance like on a boxster?

If you have wrenched before, you will find it to be no big challenge. Even somewhat bigger things like wheel bearing replacements can be handled in the garage with the proper tools.

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^^ That is good to know. Oil changes and similar routine maintence are pretty simple DIY's then? Some people I have talked to say to bring to dealers, but I'm not a fan of stealerships.

What is reliability like?

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^^ That is good to know. Oil changes and similar routine maintence are pretty simple DIY's then? Some people I have talked to say to bring to dealers, but I'm not a fan of stealerships.

What is reliability like?

Yes routine maintenance is not an issue. You will probably have to get the paper oil filter cartridge from a place that specializes in Porsche parts, but the work itself is no prob. Other things like that too are not yet available at the local auto part store, but I think we will see more availability locally as the number of used 986s grow. A Bentley manual will also guide you nicely through that kind of stuff.

Lot of people more qualified to comment on reliability than me. But my opinion and my experience - highly reliable.

My 986S is a dedicated track car. I beat the dickens out of it on the track, both motor wise and suspension (anyone who has ever driven Sebring, what I consider my home track, will know the abuse I talk about). My oil analysis comes back with amazingly consistent and limited wear.

I have never had a serious problem - wear items, sure, but anything broken has been minimal and mostly attributable to it being on the track.

I would lean toward an 03 and 04, the end of the model years for the 986 because they made some reliability enhances over the early years, but this is the kind of detail others on the board can offer more specifics.

(BTW - lots of track days in easy reach of Miami all year round)

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^^ That is good to know. Oil changes and similar routine maintence are pretty simple DIY's then? Some people I have talked to say to bring to dealers, but I'm not a fan of stealerships.

What is reliability like?

Yes routine maintenance is not an issue. You will probably have to get the paper oil filter cartridge from a place that specializes in Porsche parts, but the work itself is no prob. Other things like that too are not yet available at the local auto part store, but I think we will see more availability locally as the number of used 986s grow. A Bentley manual will also guide you nicely through that kind of stuff.

Lot of people more qualified to comment on reliability than me. But my opinion and my experience - highly reliable.

My 986S is a dedicated track car. I beat the dickens out of it on the track, both motor wise and suspension (anyone who has ever driven Sebring, what I consider my home track, will know the abuse I talk about). My oil analysis comes back with amazingly consistent and limited wear.

I have never had a serious problem - wear items, sure, but anything broken has been minimal and mostly attributable to it being on the track.

I would lean toward an 03 and 04, the end of the model years for the 986 because they made some reliability enhances over the early years, but this is the kind of detail others on the board can offer more specifics.

(BTW - lots of track days in easy reach of Miami all year round)

Yeah, I very rarely buy parts for my Audi from the local autozone. For maintenance I get Audi OEM recommended parts from either the dealer or Audi VAG specific online stores like Eurocode and ECS.

I'm specifically looking at the 2003 model year. I'm happy to know that they sound like pretty reliable cars. I was concerned when I got in to my Audi that reliability and maintenance would really hurt my wallet, but I was surprised to find that as long as I keep up with the maintenance, she seems to be in great shape even at 80k miles.

What are the most common trouble spots to look out for while shopping for a 986?

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^^ That is good to know. Oil changes and similar routine maintence are pretty simple DIY's then? Some people I have talked to say to bring to dealers, but I'm not a fan of stealerships.

What is reliability like?

Yes routine maintenance is not an issue. You will probably have to get the paper oil filter cartridge from a place that specializes in Porsche parts, but the work itself is no prob. Other things like that too are not yet available at the local auto part store, but I think we will see more availability locally as the number of used 986s grow. A Bentley manual will also guide you nicely through that kind of stuff.

Lot of people more qualified to comment on reliability than me. But my opinion and my experience - highly reliable.

My 986S is a dedicated track car. I beat the dickens out of it on the track, both motor wise and suspension (anyone who has ever driven Sebring, what I consider my home track, will know the abuse I talk about). My oil analysis comes back with amazingly consistent and limited wear.

I have never had a serious problem - wear items, sure, but anything broken has been minimal and mostly attributable to it being on the track.

I would lean toward an 03 and 04, the end of the model years for the 986 because they made some reliability enhances over the early years, but this is the kind of detail others on the board can offer more specifics.

(BTW - lots of track days in easy reach of Miami all year round)

Yeah, I very rarely buy parts for my Audi from the local autozone. For maintenance I get Audi OEM recommended parts from either the dealer or Audi VAG specific online stores like Eurocode and ECS.

I'm specifically looking at the 2003 model year. I'm happy to know that they sound like pretty reliable cars. I was concerned when I got in to my Audi that reliability and maintenance would really hurt my wallet, but I was surprised to find that as long as I keep up with the maintenance, she seems to be in great shape even at 80k miles.

What are the most common trouble spots to look out for while shopping for a 986?

Hi KPC! Welcome to "almost" being a 986 Owner ;)

In regards to maintainance and "trouble spots" you should first and foremost be aware of a couple of things:

1) Sunset Imports (which there is a direct link on this website for at the top of the forums) has THE best prices on ANY parts you need or want to replace as an OEM, or Tequipment (essentially upgraded Porsche equipment, like Litronic HID headlights, aero body kits, etc). Gaurantee you'll have a HARD time beating their prices even if you use froogle, ebay, or some other site. So trust me... as someone who likes to "tinker" on my Boxster S, that's the way to go.

2) If you're considering the Boxster, I HIGHLY recommend you get the Boxster S. There's a sneaky and notroiously known "bug" if you will that seems to be much more common with Boxster (2.5 and 2.7L engines) vs. the 3.2 or 3.4 engines. This is the IMS (Intermediate Shaft) problem. The 3.2 engine, seems to be far less common for you to ever have to worry about this, and it's more common on the smaller engines, and lower mileage.... why you might ask? Well that's a little bit of a mystery still, but nonetheless, there's tons of info on it.

3) Another common thing that typically goes after a while, is the AOS (Air Oil Separator) which is a special piece on the Boxsters that separates the Air Mixture from the Oil mixture. Many folks have replaced theres after a while, and while though it can be a bit of a pain to replace (but not a huge pain... took me 3 hours), they tend to go after higher mileage, 35k - 65k? I'm big on "preventative" maintainence, and am pretty anal about keeping my Boxster S in tip-top-shape, so I replaced mine not too long ago just as a precaution. There's also a MotorSports AOS (which is typically used in track cars) which is a MUCH bigger and beefier (and more expensive) AOS (2 distinct compartments) that you can also install on the Boxster S. The installation is similar, but takes a bit more work to get in the confined spaces of the engine compartment. I plan to do this later on, but you don't have to. Typically, people have complained that when they are at high speeds on the track, and go into a sharp turn, the stock AOS tends to crap out a little during the turn and puffs big fumes of white / gray smoke. For my 00' Boxster S, a new OEM AOS cost about $80 from sunset, and I believe the MotorSports one from Sunset goes for about $220.

4) Spark Plugs, Spark Plug Tubes, and O-Rings. Typically at higher mileage, you'll want to eventually replace your spark plugs. I HIGHLY recommend replacing with the OEM spark plugs (which are BOSCHE and go for about $3 / piece from Sunset). I've heard of others trying higher temperature ones, and mixing and matching, and the result has never been good. Also, I replaced all 6 of my spark plug tubes and o-rings (2 o-rings per tube), which are special tubes that the spark plug fits in. Why? Well, all your spark plugs are located on the bottom of the car. 3 on each rear side. So you have to first remove your wheels on the back to access them. The reason to replace the tubes and o-rings is simple. Over time, the tubes can crack and the o-rings themselves can loose their seal, which can cause some oil leaking. Nothing serious, but again... preventative maintainence my friend. Tubes were like 0.50 cents a piece, and the o-rings were less than that. Very cheap, and cost effective way to go.

5) Oil, Oil Filter, and Oil Washer for your drain plug. My recommendation... STAY WITH THE FACTORY OIL! 0W-40 Euro Synthetic Mobil 1 oil. 9.5 quarts (Yes you heard me right... 9.5 quarts). You don't have to change your oil for 15,000 miles, but as again... a preventative guy, I change mine more often... typically between 3,000 and 6,000 miles. In fact, I JUST received 10 quarts of oil, the filter, and the oil plug washer ring from Sunset today, so here's the bill (all from Sunset) $5.18 per quart of oil * 10 = $51.80, Aluminum Seal Ring $0.46, Oil Filter $12.81. Trust me, I couldn't find the oil cheaper anywhere else, and best part is... no Tax from Sunset.

6) Throttle Body Cleaning.... do yourself a favor, get some good carbureator / throttle body cleaner, put the top in service mode, disconnect the air intake tubes, and spend the 30 mins from start to finish to clean your throttle body (inside, butterfly, lips). It's just a good thing to do, and will insure you have normal idleing, and response.

7) Radiator and Front Bumper Cleaning... typically this needs to be done more in the fall when there's leaves all over the place. On the S series boxster you have 3 radiators all behind the front bumper, otherwise a typical boxster has 2. Nothing hard here, just take the front bumper cover off, sweep it out, and clean up any debris around the radiators. Also check the intakes on the right and left side of the car (the air vents), and double check there's no debris in there.

8) If you plan to work anywhere near the battery, run wires for new amps / speakers, etc.... do yourself another favor, Buy the Thumbknurl screw kit (there's a link under specials at the top of these forums). There's two plastic cover panels on the front hood that in my opinion, had very poorly designed screws. In fact, mine were rusted shut. They are the screws that hold these covers in place. It's a 15 minute fix if that. You just pry out the old screws holding in the plastic covers, insert the new special thumbknurl washer/nut, and then hand tighten the new thumbscrew. Very easy, very effective, great design.

9) Drainage holes.... I'm not going to get into a whole bunch of details here, there's tons of information on this, but again, it's good to clean these out every once in a while, as debris can get trapped in them. It's MORE important to clean out the drainage holes underneath your canopy cover, because if those get clogged, chances are, water will eventually leak into your drivers side compartment under the seat, and ruin your alarm system computer (which is located under the front seat.

10) Check your CV boots, especially the rear. I haven't had any issues with this... but there was just recently a brand new write up on how to replace these, and make sure they're in good running order.

And that's about it for now. You'll find TONS of info on all of the above I've mentioned on this site. In addition, get yourself a Bentley Manual, and eventually, if you're hard core like me, get yourself the full-set of Porsche Technical Manuals. The Bentleys good for certain stuff, but lacking in others.

Again, welcome to Porsche... there IS NO subsititute! B)

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^^ Thanks for all the info USAF! :thankyou:

I should have clarified earlier that I'm definitely looking for a 986 S. So let me reply to a few of your points.

About the plugs, in my Audi because of the turbo I like to run much colder copper series Bosch plugs, not iridium or platinum. This helps me keep my the temps down a little bit, but the trade off is that they only last about 5000-7500 before they start to foul. As a result I change them out every time I do my oil, filter, and washer. Speaking of oil, I only use Mobil 1 0w-40 full syn European formula in my Audi, so that isn't a stretch for me. I'm surprised to hear that the Boxster takes 9.5 quarts! That's wicked!

As for the TB cleaning, I've yet to do it in my Audi, but I'm sure I could. Just a huge hoses and clamps and there it is. I'm aware that there is a procedure to put it in service mode. I actually replaced my OEM TB hose with a more rigid, silicone one because it was determined that under high boost pressure, sometimes that hose can collapse!

As for the Bentley Manual, I've got one for my A4, but I also have a VAG-com diagnostic tool. It's basically what the shops use to read codes, but it also is great for logging data, which can then be used to help tune the car further after modifications to timing, fueling, turbo, etc. Is there a tool like that available to the public for Porsche as well?

Check out the link I put in my first post about my A4, just so you can get an idea of where I'm coming from. I love to DIY, I'm huge on maintenance (almost to the point of overkill), and I like to mod. If I do go with a Boxster S, I'm still about a year away from making a purchase. Even so, when buying a high end sports car like this, I would expect to take a year and learn all I could about it before I bought one anyway.

I hope to be really active here and I can't wait to get involved in the Porsche scene.

Cheers!

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^^ Thanks for all the info USAF! :thankyou:

I should have clarified earlier that I'm definitely looking for a 986 S. So let me reply to a few of your points.

About the plugs, in my Audi because of the turbo I like to run much colder copper series Bosch plugs, not iridium or platinum. This helps me keep my the temps down a little bit, but the trade off is that they only last about 5000-7500 before they start to foul. As a result I change them out every time I do my oil, filter, and washer. Speaking of oil, I only use Mobil 1 0w-40 full syn European formula in my Audi, so that isn't a stretch for me. I'm surprised to hear that the Boxster takes 9.5 quarts! That's wicked!

As for the TB cleaning, I've yet to do it in my Audi, but I'm sure I could. Just a huge hoses and clamps and there it is. I'm aware that there is a procedure to put it in service mode. I actually replaced my OEM TB hose with a more rigid, silicone one because it was determined that under high boost pressure, sometimes that hose can collapse!

As for the Bentley Manual, I've got one for my A4, but I also have a VAG-com diagnostic tool. It's basically what the shops use to read codes, but it also is great for logging data, which can then be used to help tune the car further after modifications to timing, fueling, turbo, etc. Is there a tool like that available to the public for Porsche as well?

Check out the link I put in my first post about my A4, just so you can get an idea of where I'm coming from. I love to DIY, I'm huge on maintenance (almost to the point of overkill), and I like to mod. If I do go with a Boxster S, I'm still about a year away from making a purchase. Even so, when buying a high end sports car like this, I would expect to take a year and learn all I could about it before I bought one anyway.

I hope to be really active here and I can't wait to get involved in the Porsche scene.

Cheers!

Good to hear, and nice to have a fellow "wrencher" on board.

In terms of the diagnostic utilities. Check out durametric (just do a google search). It can read codes etc.... to be honest, I'm not 100% pro durametric, since it doesn't allow you to modify or change any settings really. It only allows you to read, and clear some codes. Good for CEL lights and troubleshooting the alarm system (a.k.a the inside infrared sensors). I'd really like to get my hands on a PST2 which is the Porsche Diagnostic and Programming tool. Unfortunately, if you're lucky, you can get a used one for $2000 and upwards. I've seen them as expensive as $5000. The PST2 was replaced by the newer PIWIS diagnostics tool, but... and a big but.... don't plan on getting your hands on that anytime soon, they're upwards of $10k just for a lease. There's some posters on here though who ocassionally sell the PST2.

With the PST2, you can actually modify the ECU, program new keys, and a whole bunch of other features that typically can only be done by "bringing your Porsche to the dealer." And i think everyone on this board would agree that the Porsche dealership will charge a pretty penny for most services.

When I bought my Boxster S, I right away replaced the transmission with a brand new one and the clutch, and the RMS (Rear Main Seal, which you'll hear a lot of people talk about from time to time). There's a company by the name of vertex auto who will allow you to drop the transmission, and pay for free shipping to their shop where they'll replace it all and get you back on your feet for as little as $2000, which in my mind, was a good deal considering Porsche transmissions are "something special," and other places would charge a fortune for this task.

Before you buy your Boxster S, give it a good test run, really work the gears! And if at all possible, make SURE you get the original manuals, and maintainence stamps if they're available. You should also try to get at least 2 keys, since any additional keys have to be programmed by the dealer unless of course, you have a PST2 or PIWIS.

Some recommendations for your "planned" upgrades. The 3.2L engine was made with "performance in mind" and as such, replacing the Intake with a CAI, and bolting on a new exhaust system, doesn't really do a lot. In fact I've heard MANY complaints and problems from people with the CAIs that are available out there today. So take that for what it's worth. In addition, if you plan to add any type of supercharger, or turbo... plan again, to pay a pretty penny. Although most are pretty low compression and thus don't damage your engine... again... I've heard many a folk with "leaks" in the system. The Turbo and Supercharger kits that are available, will probably cost you brand new, between $8000 - $12000. In my opinion it's almost "safer" to do an engine swap for a 3.4L or 3.6L at that point. There's another person on these forums by the name of Jake Raby who can "modify" your 3.2L engine and essentially make it bullet-proof and bore and re-build the engine to a 3.6 spec. Around the same price of an engine swap. But the good news with going that route.... you're pretty much gauranteed not to have to ever worry about an IMS failure, as he puts in an overkill solution.

I'm sure we could have conversations galore about upgrading the audio system, wheels, body kits etc. But i'll save that for another time. B) Let me know how you're search for a Boxster S goes, who knows, maybe you'll buy mine when it's all said and done j/k :)

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Good to hear, and nice to have a fellow "wrencher" on board.

In terms of the diagnostic utilities. Check out durametric (just do a google search). It can read codes etc.... to be honest, I'm not 100% pro durametric, since it doesn't allow you to modify or change any settings really. It only allows you to read, and clear some codes. Good for CEL lights and troubleshooting the alarm system (a.k.a the inside infrared sensors). I'd really like to get my hands on a PST2 which is the Porsche Diagnostic and Programming tool. Unfortunately, if you're lucky, you can get a used one for $2000 and upwards. I've seen them as expensive as $5000. The PST2 was replaced by the newer PIWIS diagnostics tool, but... and a big but.... don't plan on getting your hands on that anytime soon, they're upwards of $10k just for a lease. There's some posters on here though who ocassionally sell the PST2.

With the PST2, you can actually modify the ECU, program new keys, and a whole bunch of other features that typically can only be done by "bringing your Porsche to the dealer." And i think everyone on this board would agree that the Porsche dealership will charge a pretty penny for most services.

When I bought my Boxster S, I right away replaced the transmission with a brand new one and the clutch, and the RMS (Rear Main Seal, which you'll hear a lot of people talk about from time to time). There's a company by the name of vertex auto who will allow you to drop the transmission, and pay for free shipping to their shop where they'll replace it all and get you back on your feet for as little as $2000, which in my mind, was a good deal considering Porsche transmissions are "something special," and other places would charge a fortune for this task.

Before you buy your Boxster S, give it a good test run, really work the gears! And if at all possible, make SURE you get the original manuals, and maintainence stamps if they're available. You should also try to get at least 2 keys, since any additional keys have to be programmed by the dealer unless of course, you have a PST2 or PIWIS.

Some recommendations for your "planned" upgrades. The 3.2L engine was made with "performance in mind" and as such, replacing the Intake with a CAI, and bolting on a new exhaust system, doesn't really do a lot. In fact I've heard MANY complaints and problems from people with the CAIs that are available out there today. So take that for what it's worth. In addition, if you plan to add any type of supercharger, or turbo... plan again, to pay a pretty penny. Although most are pretty low compression and thus don't damage your engine... again... I've heard many a folk with "leaks" in the system. The Turbo and Supercharger kits that are available, will probably cost you brand new, between $8000 - $12000. In my opinion it's almost "safer" to do an engine swap for a 3.4L or 3.6L at that point. There's another person on these forums by the name of Jake Raby who can "modify" your 3.2L engine and essentially make it bullet-proof and bore and re-build the engine to a 3.6 spec. Around the same price of an engine swap. But the good news with going that route.... you're pretty much gauranteed not to have to ever worry about an IMS failure, as he puts in an overkill solution.

I'm sure we could have conversations galore about upgrading the audio system, wheels, body kits etc. But I'll save that for another time. B) Let me know how you're search for a Boxster S goes, who knows, maybe you'll buy mine when it's all said and done j/k :)

I doubt very much that I will end up doing forced induction or a motor swap on a 986 S. At most for engine mods I was thinking headers and high flow cats, second cat deletes and test pipes, cat-back exhaust, intake, and a chip from Revo or Giac. That's really about it. Because it's all motor, I know that just a chip and full exhaust won't do much. On the contrary, my A4 with a ECU chip flash, full exhaust and injectors can free up like 60+ awhp and 80 ftlbs or more depending on how aggressive we set the timing. Those are all wheel numbers, not crank numbers either.

I've never really been in to the big thumping stereos either. Just good quality Bose speakers all around is plenty for me. Haha, I know a 25 year old without subs is pretty rare these days, but it's never been my thing... Always paid more attention to what is under the hood.

I would like to do HID's, OEM Navigation, and apparently the garage door home-link isn't a standard option? I'd have to retro-fit that for sure...

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Welcome to the Porsche world! I'll chime in again and say join your local PCA when you get your car. Great people and always lots of fun things to do.

My only warning is don't get frightened off by all the 'my engine blew up' posts. In any forum typically see all the bad stuff and very little good stuff. I have a 99 2.5L that is almost a daily driver, is well maintained, slightly modded, and she doesn't give me a lick of trouble. I'm a firm believer that these cars like to driven and

more problem occur when they sit. That being said if you do run into trouble there is a ton of knowledge here.

One minor tip (I didn't thoroughly read all the posts so sorry if this was mentioned) is to clean out the leaves and other gunk from the radiators. You'll be amazed how much material can build up, especially in between the radiator and AC condenser. This will require the removal of the front bumper, but well worth the time. Pedro's Garage I believe has a DIY on it. If you don't eventually that gunk can eat into a radiator and cause a leak.

Cheers!

Chris

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Welcome to the Porsche world! I'll chime in again and say join your local PCA when you get your car. Great people and always lots of fun things to do.

My only warning is don't get frightened off by all the 'my engine blew up' posts. In any forum typically see all the bad stuff and very little good stuff. I have a 99 2.5L that is almost a daily driver, is well maintained, slightly modded, and she doesn't give me a lick of trouble. I'm a firm believer that these cars like to driven and

more problem occur when they sit. That being said if you do run into trouble there is a ton of knowledge here.

One minor tip (I didn't thoroughly read all the posts so sorry if this was mentioned) is to clean out the leaves and other gunk from the radiators. You'll be amazed how much material can build up, especially in between the radiator and AC condenser. This will require the removal of the front bumper, but well worth the time. Pedro's Garage I believe has a DIY on it. If you don't eventually that gunk can eat into a radiator and cause a leak.

Cheers!

Chris

Chris, thanks for the welcome. I'm not scared off by all the "my motor went kapowie" threads. It's the same way on my Audi forum. 100 people might buy the same part or do the same mod, but the 10 people that post about it are the ones that ran in to trouble. It's good to hear another person say that these cars like to be run. If I do end up with a 986 S, it will most likely be my daily driver for the next few years. I explained my situation in my first post, but to reiterate I'm moving down to Miami from Boston for the next few years while I finish my MD/DPM degree, and I won't really have a need for my quattro until I move back to Boston. I guess you could say that the term daily driver takes on a different meaning for a full time med student. I will most likely be on campus all day long and also be living very close to my clinical sites, which means any real appreciable mileage will only occur on the weekends. Assuming the car is in good running order, would it survive a road trip from Boston to Miami once or twice a year?

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Assuming the car is in good running order, would it survive a road trip from Boston to Miami once or twice a year?

I take mine on long trips and it is quite comfortable to be in for several hours. Last June I went from CT to NC for the Porsche Parade in one shot. Next month I am going down to VA right near Skyline Drive from CT. You should be fine.

Chris

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