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I was at a PCA event at California Speedway a couple of weeks a go and there was a vendor there that does mobile wheel repair.

They can fix minor curb rash on certain wheels on the spot. I saw them working on a customers wheel (still on the car) that was very similar to mine. (See picture of my wheel.)

They guy used an electric grinder and a polisher. I must say I came back later in the day and the customers wheel looked amazing. Any members familiar with metal working think this is possible to do yourself?

If so what kind of tools would you need?

I just grazed the edge of my driveway yesterday and got another blemish on my rim. Sure would like to be able to fix this myself if possible.

My wheeels are not chromed just polished.

Thanks !!

post-7267-1240419668_thumb.jpg

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I was at a PCA event at California Speedway a couple of weeks a go and there was a vendor there that does mobile wheel repair.

They can fix minor curb rash on certain wheels on the spot. I saw them working on a customers wheel (still on the car) that was very similar to mine. (See picture of my wheel.)

They guy used an electric grinder and a polisher. I must say I came back later in the day and the customers wheel looked amazing. Any members familiar with metal working think this is possible to do yourself?

If so what kind of tools would you need?

I just grazed the edge of my driveway yesterday and got another blemish on my rim. Sure would like to be able to fix this myself if possible.

My wheeels are not chromed just polished.

Thanks !!

It's hard to see any damage on your wheel, even with the photo enlarged, so the damage might be slight enough that you can fix it yourself.

It does take some experience to get perfect results (i.e., where no one can spot the repair) but you can certainly get to 90 or 95 percent with some effort and patience.

A grinder and different grades of buffing wheels, with different abrasive compounds (jeweler's rouge, etc.) can get a surface with relatively minor damage flat and polished again.

In the case of the lip on your wheel, it would be helpful if you had one of those flexible (cable) attachments for the grinder and the polishing operation. That gives you all the maneuverability you need.

For the grinding part, work in reverse order of abrasiveness, so that you don't use anything more aggressive than necessary. For the polishing, start with the coarser compounds, then use successively finer ones until you get the desired result that matches the gloss on the rest of the wheel. Don't skip any grades of compounds when polishing.

Regards, Maurice.

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Maurice,

Thank you for the great information. That picture is an old picture of the front wheel. The damage is one the rear. Can you direct me in what kind of grinder (electric tool) to buy? Where would be the best place to buy it? What accessories should I get?

Thanks again!

Phillip

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Maurice,

Thank you for the great information. That picture is an old picture of the front wheel. The damage is one the rear. Can you direct me in what kind of grinder (electric tool) to buy? Where would be the best place to buy it? What accessories should I get?

Thanks again!

Phillip

Phillip:

I use air tools, in this case both an in-line mini grinder and a mini angle grinder. IIRC I got them from Harbor Freight Tools about 10 years ago.

If you don't have a good compressor(mine is a massive "Quadzilla" :P , I think you might be able to use one of the more powerful Dremel tools, although I have never used a Dremel personally for that purpose. I know that Dremel has a good flexible shaft attachment that would give you excellent control and allow you to approach the damage with the best angles. They have all sorts of attachments that you can get. If you go to Home Depot, ask for the section that carries buffing wheels and bonnets and compounds such as the jeweler's rouge I mentioned. Look around and you'll get a good idea of what I am talking about. Then you can use the Dremel to apply the compounds after you have smoothed the surface with the grinding wheels.

Regards, Maurice.

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Thank you! I really appreciate it :D

I'll let you know how it goes

Definitely keep us posted.

And don't forget to take lots of pics! B)

Regards, Maurice.

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Hi guys.

I knocked my 997 wheels the other day :angry: i was lucky that the clear coat is thick and took must the scuffing. It was only just a brush on the curb. phew!

I used a dremal Tool I guess you have them in the states as there here in uk. they fit more like a big pencil in your hand! if you know what i mean.. I used some cutting compound and used a polishing wheel, there very small about an inch dia. I was able to polish out the scuffs in the clear to being not visible at all. there was one small stone chip size nik that had just gone through to the wheel. I filled it with some clear and a number 0 artist brush. care fully cut it back with some 1200 grit (wet) and then polished it smooth, you'd have to look very hard to see it now..

if the lips are polished raw metal with no clear then the range of small grinding disc's and sanding/polishing wheels for Dremals is very good... it might take some pain out of polishing it up but still have a nice conrol over the tool..

Long story short I used a dremal!!

J

Edited by atomicveilside

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I found this kit on the internet. Looks like it would have everything I would need, What do you think? :huh:

http://www.autobodytoolmart.com/pc-16391-1...it-3956-02.aspx

Hi.

Ye thats the one you even get the pen bit.. It's worth getting as there just handy to have in general. can be used around the house for bits of diy sanding in corners or drilling holes that a big drill wont get to.. I even use mine to help me build a Steam Traction engine, polishing brass parts removing burs from machining etc.. when it's finished it'll do 0 to 5 mph is 2.9 seconds!!!! Lol..

in the UK we have some car chrome polish called autosol it's a cutting paste and i used it when I rebult and old MINI to polish up the front grill chrome, used it now on my exhaust tips. it will help with the final polishing stages... I think if you start by grinding off any ruff bits if there are any then move onto some wet and dry paper going finer each time and using wet then finish off with the polishing wheel and compound..

O and you tend to get covered in compound as it spins round.. you'll look like some sort of modern art piece by the time your done but your wheels will look good! and it's all part the fun though... i'd wear goggles just in case.

let us know how you get on..

Edited by atomicveilside

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phillip, if it is just a small blemish, I'd suggest you keep it less complicated by sanding with your hands.

You will get a better feel of the surface being repaired gradually blending smooth, less chance of messing up by hand.

You don't need any tools unless you're in the business and have lots of wheels to fix.

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Cosmo,

Unfortunetly it's a big blemish. I ground it against a cement curb :angry: The are some minor blemishes on the other rear wheel. I think I will start with that one.

I figure I can give it a try and if it doesn't work out I will send them out to a pro.

I will go ahead and get the Dremel kit anyway. Looks like a good addition to my tool kit.

Thanks everyone for all of your input!! :D

Phillip

Edited by phillipj

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Okay,

So I bought a Dremel tool with accessories. I bought three levels of polishing compounds as well. It was kind of scary :o but I started grinding on the wheel with the worst damage (the cement driveway chewed it up pretty bad.)

I figured that If I made it worse I would have it done by a pro. To my suprise I did a pretty good job. :D It looks much better than when I started.

I realize that I need a much larger surface area tool to sand and polish. The Dremel comes with very small attachments. I will purchase additional polishing/sanding heads to finish the job.

I will post pictures once I'm done (I'm only about 50% there now.) It won't be prefect but you will really have to scrutinize it to see the flaws.

It will be nice to know that I can fix my own scuffs in the future (I'm sure there will be more.) :cursing:

Update later

Phillipj

Edited by phillipj

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