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vividracing

How to Install New Front Rotors - 997 Carrera/Turbo

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We just received our new 2 piece floating rotors for the factory Porsche 6 piston brakes that fit our 997 Turbo. There are many reasons why to upgrade to these rotors. Some influencing factors are the rotational weight savings of 3lbs per corner, the dissipation of heat under hard braking, and the floating design to give you improved braking and pad wear.

Tools Needed

  • Torque Wrench
  • Socket Wrench
  • 10mm Allen Socket
  • Flat Head Screwdriver
  • Philips Head Screwdriver
  • Strap to Hold Caliper

tools.jpg

Step 1 - First you want to find a flat spot to jack up the first side of the car you plan on doing. Loosen the lug bolts slightly. Once you lift it to the needed height, make sure to put a jack stand underneath for safety. Remove the lug bolts and pull off the wheel.

IMG_3333a.jpg

Step 2 - Turn the steering wheel to allow you to access the bolts with the 10mm allen socket to remove the caliper. Once the bolts are removed, use the flat head screwdrive to seperate the pads from the rotor and slide the caliper off. Secure the caliper in place with a strap or bungee cord by the coilover.

IMG_3335a.jpg

IMG_3334a.jpg

Step 3 - Next take the philips head screwdriver and remove the screws that hold the rotor to the wheel hub. Pull off the old rotor. Grab the new Brembo rotor which is specific to the left and right. There is no need to clean them.

IMG_3332a.jpg

Step 4 - Put the new Brembo rotor in place and fasten the philips head screws. Grab the caliper and then slide it over the rotor and place the 10mm allen bolts back in place. Use your Torque Wrench and tighten them down to 55lbs each.

IMG_3336a.jpg

IMG_3337a.jpg

Step 5 - Check to make sure your hardware is tight and the rotor spins without any obstructions. Make sure your brakeline is not pinched. Reinstall your wheel on the car. Once you lower the car, torque your wheel bolts to about 90lbs.

IMG_3339a.jpg

IMG_3342a.jpg

IMG_3341a.jpg

Step 6 - Bed in your new rotors by doing 5 hard braking stops from 60-5mph. You should be activating the ABS. Once they are bed in, go enjoy your new stopping performance!

IMG_3353a.jpg

IMG_3354a.jpg

IMG_3352a.jpg

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1. No need to bleed after removing the rotors?

2. Did you need an impact driver to remove the phillips screws from the rotor?

3. Nice write up and a very sweet Turbo indeed! :clapping:

:cheers:

Edited by phillipj

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1. No need to bleed after removing the rotors?

2. Did you need an impact driver to remove the phillips screws from the rotor?

3. Nice write up and a very sweet Turbo indeed! :clapping:

:cheers:

Phillip:

If you are not touching the bleed nipples or disconnecting any of the brake lines, there is no need to bleed the brakes. In this nicely illustrated procedure, you are just "hanging" the calipers out of the way so as to not put any undue strain on the rubber brake lines.

Regards, Maurice.

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From what the poster says there is a 3 pound difference in weight which is prettty substantial. For the track I'm sure they have their benefits over the stock rotor.

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From what the poster says there is a 3 pound difference in weight which is prettty substantial. For the track I'm sure they have their benefits over the stock rotor.

I'm an idiot

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From what the poster says there is a 3 pound difference in weight which is prettty substantial. For the track I'm sure they have their benefits over the stock rotor.

I'm an idiot

lol!! :D

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Vivid,

Does the term "floating rotor" come from the fact that the rotor is seperate (bolted on) to it's hub? This is basically a racing rotor where the rotor itself can be replaced (without replacing the hub) correct?

Do the gaps in the hub flange assist in cooling?

Thanks

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Vivid,

Does the term "floating rotor" come from the fact that the rotor is seperate (bolted on) to it's hub? This is basically a racing rotor where the rotor itself can be replaced (without replacing the hub) correct?

Do the gaps in the hub flange assist in cooling?

Thanks

Thats correct, you can replace the rotor separate from the hub. Although you should always order the replacement rotor with attachment hardware, but the hub you can re-use.

I bought my set from vividracing and use my car on the track (20+ track days a year) and I definitely felt a difference in stopping power. With Pagid Yellows the car stops like a freight train.

Like any rotor they will develop some cracks over time but with them being slotted they don't run to the edge of the rotor as quickly. By the time the cracks become an issue you are already reaching the minimum thickness and its time to replace them.

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A small question, are the new rotors installed as they should, left/right? If you take a look on the first pic., the OEM rotor pattern (holes) is drilled for a right hand rotor, the pattern of the new one in contrary is milled in the opposite direction, for a left hand rotor. I have no experience with that kind of rotors, but it looks strange to me.

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