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Anyone changed out their own clutch?


Dus10R

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Time to change clutch, I was wondering how long it really takes to do it? I've seen the Porsche manual and it seems very cut and dried. I stopped by a Porsche repair facility (non-dealer) and they quoted me book at 17.6 hours. Seemed to me like a blindfolded chimpanzee drunk on jack Daniels could do it in 17.6 hours but a normal reasoning human could probably do it in 6 (learning curve).

Anyone here done it themselves?

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I did it in my driveway with the car 4 feet in the air on cribbing it took nearly as long to get the car up and back down as it did to do the job. here is what I learned.

Make sure the car is high enough to get the transmission out whilst on the tranny jack.

1. Remove under panels.

2. Remove axle shaft bolts from transmission. Tie out of the way with wire. I left the bolts in place.

3. Support engine/transmission with a floor jack, remove the forward transmission support bracket.

4. Install engine support bracket. Adjust so the engine, transmission is leaning downward. This will allow better access to the transmission bolts at the top of the bell housing.

you will need 2 ft of 1/2 in extension with a universal joint to reach them. Keep track of the location of the bolts, they are different lengths. There is also 1 torx bolt or (full square?), be careful not to strip it.

5. Remove clutch cylinder, One bolt is blind, be patient it will come out. Drop the cylinder assy and tie out of the way. There is several inches of rubber hose. Inspect for leaks, cracks etc.

6. With the two tranny bolts at 3 and 9 o,clock loosened but not removed, install the tranny jack to take the load.

7. Remove the shifter cables from the levers on the transmission. They snap on and off. Apply some grease during reassembly.

8. Remove the two remaining bolts and gently!!!! rock the transmission loose while pulling it forward. Take note of the coolant hoses and be careful not to pinch them. If the floor is level and the

tranny is leaning downward, you will have to adjust the jack height as the tranny comes out.

9. Replace fuel filter at this time. It will never be easier.

10. Inspect the transmission mounting bushing at the front end, if cracked, replace (mine was, $80.00 from Pelican)

11. Remove pressure plate and clutch assy. Discard bolts use new ones when reassembling.

12. I would remove the flywheel to have a look at the RMS and IMS, If either is leaking, now would be the time to address. I did the IMS bearing upgrade from LN Engineering at the same time.

The bearing upgrade is another level of invasion requiring locking cam shafts, replacing oil plugs etc.

It took about 4 hours to remove, not counting the 2 plus hours I needed to remove the stripped torx bolt (be careful here). I could have it out in 2 hours the next time. literally 32+/- bolts and its out.

check here for a pictorial www.c-speedracing.com/howto/996rms/rms1.php

Good luck and don't be scared.

James Greerengine_bracket.pdf

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  • Moderators
Time to change clutch, I was wondering how long it really takes to do it? I've seen the Porsche manual and it seems very cut and dried. I stopped by a Porsche repair facility (non-dealer) and they quoted me book at 17.6 hours. Seemed to me like a blindfolded chimpanzee drunk on jack Daniels could do it in 17.6 hours but a normal reasoning human could probably do it in 6 (learning curve).

Anyone here done it themselves?

On a lift in a well equipped shop, 4-6 hours total is realistic; if the dealer (who must be taking a nap during the process) quotes 17.6 hours, you need another dealer..........

Edited by JFP in PA
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It takes me about 8 hours for a C2 clutch change, not counting the time i take to replace all the old grease on the transmission input shaft and clutch fork pivot and removal of the flywheel to inspect for IMS and RMS oil leaks,

It definatly will not be all said and done in 7 hours for someone who 1) has never done it before 2) for someone who has never done a clutch job 3) someone who has only a 55 peice ratchet set 4) for someone who has no vehicle lift 5) for someone who doesnt have a engine jack 6) for someone who doesnt have a transmission jack.

Luckily for me, I have all the right hand & pneumatic tools and equipment needed to perform this service safely within an 8 hour time line.

If you find someone who says they do it quicker, be warned, while its nice to hear "I can do it in 5 hours for $XX.xx dollars" seems nice, but do you really want to have someone working that fast and possibly very careless working on your car? My recommendation is to find an indy porsche shop that can do it in 8-10 hours.

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It takes me about 8 hours for a C2 clutch change, not counting the time i take to replace all the old grease on the transmission input shaft and clutch fork pivot and removal of the flywheel to inspect for IMS and RMS oil leaks,

It definatly will not be all said and done in 7 hours for someone who 1) has never done it before 2) for someone who has never done a clutch job 3) someone who has only a 55 peice ratchet set 4) for someone who has no vehicle lift 5) for someone who doesnt have a engine jack 6) for someone who doesnt have a transmission jack.

Luckily for me, I have all the right hand & pneumatic tools and equipment needed to perform this service safely within an 8 hour time line.

If you find someone who says they do it quicker, be warned, while its nice to hear "I can do it in 5 hours for $XX.xx dollars" seems nice, but do you really want to have someone working that fast and possibly very careless working on your car? My recommendation is to find an indy porsche shop that can do it in 8-10 hours.

6 hours top, and that is for a "white glove" clutch instal. Your mileage may vary :D

When I do one, I like to take all day, simply because I'm my customer and it's fun, because I'm a cheapskate, and I enjoy the sense of accomplishment I get when I do this sort of stuff.

I usually start about 8 ~ 9, and get finished by 4. I also spend an hour or two detailing the engine bay as it is easier to clean and wax the bottom of the body when the transaxle is not there.

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When I do one, I like to take all day, simply because I'm my customer and it's fun, because I'm a cheapskate, and I enjoy the sense of accomplishment I get when I do this sort of stuff.

I usually start about 8 ~ 9, and get finished by 4. I also spend an hour or two detailing the engine bay as it is easier to clean and wax the bottom of the body when the transaxle is not there.

Glad to see someone else takes the time to meticulously clean the surrounding area whenever they have something disassembled. Nothing irritates me more than seeing a job completed and grease dirt left everywhere around the job. I know it has nothing to do with how long the repair will last, it's just professional!! Ok, off my soapbox. B)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Okay... wow. Thanks for all the info. that's awesome. I have a two post Hydraulic Rotary lift and I have the transmission jack so that part is covered. Have all the tools and I have a former Toyota mechanic that's helping do it. After looking at the Porsche Service Manual it just didn't seem that difficult, not 17.6 hours difficult. What's sad is the shop I took it to is one of the best Porsche specific shops around; so when they quoted me "book" rate I was really dissapointed. I don't mind paying someone to do it if they're going to charge me a realistic price, but everyone around here quotes "book" and I can't screw myself in good conscience like that knowing they can do it in 7 hours max. They loved it when I told them that they were "high", I guess they're used to dealing with rich dudes that don't know any better and will pay whatever they ask. I even clarified it like this.." So you're telling me it's going to take you two full eight hour days to complete a clutch job?" I got the "Well there's a little more to it than you think..." In my sarcastic drawn out voice, "Rrrriiiiggghhhttt."

Are there any mechanics left that charge you for how long it actually took them to complete the job? I haven't found one...

Maybe I found a new calling, I think I can scrounge by on $95 bucks per hour of legitimate time.

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  • 4 weeks later...
I did it in my driveway with the car 4 feet in the air on cribbing it took nearly as long to get the car up and back down as it did to do the job. here is what I learned.

Make sure the car is high enough to get the transmission out whilst on the tranny jack.

1. Remove under panels.

2. Remove axle shaft bolts from transmission. Tie out of the way with wire. I left the bolts in place.

3. Support engine/transmission with a floor jack, remove the forward transmission support bracket.

4. Install engine support bracket. Adjust so the engine, transmission is leaning downward. This will allow better access to the transmission bolts at the top of the bell housing.

you will need 2 ft of 1/2 in extension with a universal joint to reach them. Keep track of the location of the bolts, they are different lengths. There is also 1 torx bolt or (full square?), be careful not to strip it.

5. Remove clutch cylinder, One bolt is blind, be patient it will come out. Drop the cylinder assy and tie out of the way. There is several inches of rubber hose. Inspect for leaks, cracks etc.

6. With the two tranny bolts at 3 and 9 o,clock loosened but not removed, install the tranny jack to take the load.

7. Remove the shifter cables from the levers on the transmission. They snap on and off. Apply some grease during reassembly.

8. Remove the two remaining bolts and gently!!!! rock the transmission loose while pulling it forward. Take note of the coolant hoses and be careful not to pinch them. If the floor is level and the

tranny is leaning downward, you will have to adjust the jack height as the tranny comes out.

9. Replace fuel filter at this time. It will never be easier.

10. Inspect the transmission mounting bushing at the front end, if cracked, replace (mine was, $80.00 from Pelican)

11. Remove pressure plate and clutch assy. Discard bolts use new ones when reassembling.

12. I would remove the flywheel to have a look at the RMS and IMS, If either is leaking, now would be the time to address. I did the IMS bearing upgrade from LN Engineering at the same time.

The bearing upgrade is another level of invasion requiring locking cam shafts, replacing oil plugs etc.

It took about 4 hours to remove, not counting the 2 plus hours I needed to remove the stripped torx bolt (be careful here). I could have it out in 2 hours the next time. literally 32+/- bolts and its out.

check here for a pictorial www.c-speedracing.com/howto/996rms/rms1.php

Good luck and don't be scared.

James Greerengine_bracket.pdf

Does the engine bracket work on a 996tt? i am going to attempt to do the clutch myself.

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Throwout assembly is different.

You'll have to pull out the pin under the bellhousing air tubes to get the throwout fork off the bearing. Removal is easy. Reinstall is tough.

Also, you have to pull the starter stud on the turbo to get the tranny out.

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is it true that to change out a clutch on a 2002 turbo the motor will need to come out with the trans... they told me that there is a bracket that will not let you remove the trans with out the motor it is supposed to be on the top of the motor and trans and only on Turbos....

do anyone know if this is true?

regards

Manny

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Okay... wow. Thanks for all the info. that's awesome. I have a two post Hydraulic Rotary lift and I have the transmission jack so that part is covered. Have all the tools and I have a former Toyota mechanic that's helping do it. After looking at the Porsche Service Manual it just didn't seem that difficult, not 17.6 hours difficult. What's sad is the shop I took it to is one of the best Porsche specific shops around; so when they quoted me "book" rate I was really dissapointed. I don't mind paying someone to do it if they're going to charge me a realistic price, but everyone around here quotes "book" and I can't screw myself in good conscience like that knowing they can do it in 7 hours max. They loved it when I told them that they were "high", I guess they're used to dealing with rich dudes that don't know any better and will pay whatever they ask. I even clarified it like this.." So you're telling me it's going to take you two full eight hour days to complete a clutch job?" I got the "Well there's a little more to it than you think..." In my sarcastic drawn out voice, "Rrrriiiiggghhhttt."

Are there any mechanics left that charge you for how long it actually took them to complete the job? I haven't found one...

Maybe I found a new calling, I think I can scrounge by on $95 bucks per hour of legitimate time.

us working techs need to eat too. if by our own experience and skill we can do a job in less than book time, then why should we give away our time and efforts? everybody thinks that mechanics are out to screw them, but it is no different than any other profession. at first you make less profit while you are learning, but as you streamline your business practices you become more profitable. when you become more profitable you dont think of ways to go back to being less profitable you are now reaping the benefits of all your previous hard work. BTW 8-10 hrs is appropriate for non turbo, 17 ish is appropriate for turbo. It can be done with engine in car, but is safer and easier to pull both together.

mattntp

Edited by mattntp
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quote]

us working techs need to eat too. if by our own experience and skill we can do a job in less than book time, then why should we give away our time and efforts? everybody thinks that mechanics are out to screw them, but it is no different than any other profession. at first you make less profit while you are learning, but as you streamline your business practices you become more profitable. when you become more profitable you dont think of ways to go back to being less profitable you are now reaping the benefits of all your previous hard work. BTW 8-10 hrs is appropriate for non turbo, 17 ish is appropriate for turbo. It can be done with engine in car, but is safer and easier to pull both together.

mattntp

I understand your argument, but book rate is so far off from actual realistic time that it should'nt even be legal to quote it. When I had a Nissan, the shop quoted me book of 8 hours to change a fuel injector, I did it myself in 45 minutes...and I'm not a "trained" tech. I understand that you can make more money by quoting book, but If I'm paying for a service by the hour it seems unethical to charge someone for hours of service that it didn't actually take. I could understand say a two hour window but you're saying it takes 17 hours, or almost two full work days to change a clutch? No way...

But I understand why techs like it... 1.) if you're working for a shop that pays book and they charge $95 - $100 per hour... you don't make that $100 per hour, you make the (aprox.) $24 an hour they pay you. So if you can squeeze in say two 8 hour "book" jobs in one day, you're doing okay... you just got paid 16 hours worth of work in only 8 hours; good for you, bad for consumer that just paid for something they didn't actually get.

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