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Based on RFM's excellent recommendation we are suggesting that folks that do their own oil changes upgrade their oil drain plug to a stainless steel version of the drain plug.

The original version is aluminum and strips very easily so this stainless steel version should eliminate that from happening.

900.219.015.00 SS Drain Plug -- US MSRP $21.40 -- Sunset Imports price $12.80.

Since I'm a DIY oil changer ...and haven't experienced this problem. I found this thread to be most valuable. I'm purchasing the stainless steel replacement plug just in case. Thanks

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If that does not work then get out your dremel tool and cut a slot across the hole and use a big screwdriver. Whenever I have rounded out phillips screws that is what I do.

Here is a picture of the screw extractor hammered into the drain plug that was stripped.

Based on RFM's excellent recommendation we are suggesting that folks that do their own oil changes upgrade their oil drain plug to a stainless steel version of the drain plug. The original version i

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  • 2 years later...

LDRHOADES,

Use a bottle jack. Press the screw extractor in with it. Lift the car only about 1/2 inch. this should seat the extractor. Break the torque, then release the jack. It took less than a minute. When replacing the plug, ensure the allen wrench is completely seated. Also, allow the engine to cool down before insert cold plug. Torque to spec.

NEVER use steel or stainless steal. They will corrode the aluminum. Has anyone worked on a motorcycle?

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  • 3 months later...

This is not in regards to the oil drain plug but in reference to the transmission fill plug, Guess is the same type of issue, difficult plug. Was able to loosen the transmission drain plug, was hard but not as much as the filler plug. I've been trying to unscrew the transmission fill plug but is extremely tight. For what I see is not an aluminium type. I'm afraid if i put too much force it will get stripped. Tried nut loosing liquid with no help. Any suggestions?

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The 10 mm allen fits. Will try rising the car a bit more in order to have more room for the break bar. Would it be ok to tap on the plug to see if it helps, how about an impact wrench?

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A word to the wise on transmission service and drain plugs: Never remove the drain plug until you get the fill plug out; if you take out the drain plug first, and then cannot get the fill plug out, you are officially in very deep yogurt because you cannot refill the gearbox. Get the fill plug out first.

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You can try tapping on the plug, just don't get over ambitious in the process. The plug should have been torqued to 22 ft. lb., so it may just be some corrosion. You might also want to try one of those new "freeze and release" penetration oil systems on the market.

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I know this may sound counter intuitive. But sometimes I've had luck breaking tough bolts by tightening them ever so slightly. Then they will back off.

Also it always helps to warm up the part. For example take the car out for a good warm up drive. Then when it's hot try to loosen it off.

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Done. Filler plug removed. When I first used the "freeze and release" spray, waited about 1 hr. Did not work. Put some more, about 2 days ago and today did tap the plug not too hard and it came out GREAT.

Thanks.

Noticed this magnetic plug p/p 99906300802. Is it recommended to use it as the drain plug? Don't think is necessary to use one as a filler plug as well.

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Done. Filler plug removed. When I first used the "freeze and release" spray, waited about 1 hr. Did not work. Put some more, about 2 days ago and today did tap the plug not too hard and it came out GREAT.Thanks. Noticed this magnetic plug p/p 99906300802. Is it recommended to use it as the drain plug? Don't think is necessary to use one as a filler plug as well.[/size]

Sometimes, persistence pays dividends. Glad you got it out.Can you provide where you saw the plug in question? I am having difficulty locating it.
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There's already a magnet inside our transmission (if you stick your pinky in the drain hole, it's toward the rear of the car. You should also feel the metal sludge on the magnet). So I don't think a magnetic plug is necessary.

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this was mentioned briefly on page one but I always hammer in a tripple square (12 point) socket, short extension, and long ratchet/breaker bar

Key is to have adequate leverage while keeping the socket straight so you don't twist it out. we also have a bag of drain plugs on hand because the lube shops around here love over tightening them.

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  • 3 months later...

The thread in Oil change told us to use 37 ft-lb to tighten the drian plug.

If you buy an LN Engineering magnetic drain plug, the torque specs are 19 ft-lbs. Very important to remember or you will be rewarded with your "following the Porsche torque specs" diligence with the privilege of starting your own "how to remove stripped drain plug?" thread. :blink:

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The thread in Oil change told us to use 37 ft-lb to tighten the drian plug.

If you buy an LN Engineering magnetic drain plug, the torque specs are 19 ft-lbs. Very important to remember or you will be rewarded with your "following the Porsche torque specs" diligence with the privilege of starting your own "how to remove stripped drain plug?" thread. :blink:

Wrong! Read the Porsche Service Manual.

The torque specs on the oil filer is 19 ft-lb.

The torque on the oil drain plug is 37 ft-lb.

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The thread in Oil change told us to use 37 ft-lb to tighten the drian plug.

If you buy an LN Engineering magnetic drain plug, the torque specs are 19 ft-lbs. Very important to remember or you will be rewarded with your "following the Porsche torque specs" diligence with the privilege of starting your own "how to remove stripped drain plug?" thread. :blink:

Wrong! Read the Porsche Service Manual.

The torque specs on the oil filer is 19 ft-lb.

The torque on the oil drain plug is 37 ft-lb.

Perhaps we need to drop a note to Charles Navvaro as his website states the following:

Uses O.E. sealing ring Porsche part number 900 123 106 30. Torque to 19 ft/lb. Replace sealing ring every time you re-install the drain plug.

Could just be a typo......

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The thread in Oil change told us to use 37 ft-lb to tighten the drian plug.

If you buy an LN Engineering magnetic drain plug, the torque specs are 19 ft-lbs. Very important to remember or you will be rewarded with your "following the Porsche torque specs" diligence with the privilege of starting your own "how to remove stripped drain plug?" thread. :blink:

Wrong! Read the Porsche Service Manual.

The torque specs on the oil filer is 19 ft-lb.

The torque on the oil drain plug is 37 ft-lb.

For a factory oil drain plug, 37 ft-lbs is the correct torque specs. However, if you replace the factory oil plug with an LN Engineering magnetic drain plug:

http://www.lnengineering.com/drainplug.html

...the torque specs are only 19 ft-lbs. Forgetting this fact and torquing the aftermarket oil plug to nearly twice its recommended torque specs has a high probability of shearing the drain plug, hence my evangelist reminders in oil changing threads to prevent others from encountering the same problem. No disrespect is intended to LN Engineering or their products - they clearly state their torque specs - it's just one of those things that you know when you first buy it, but then after a couple of oil changes, especially if the car sits a bit, you tend to forget.

The magnetic drain plug is cheap insurance against metal flaking in the motor, although cutting the oil filter after every oil change probably has the same effectiveness and is free. So, if you're like me and concerned about IMS bearing issues but would prefer to do due diligence during routine maintenance instead of spending thousands replacing a part that did not fail enough to warrant a recall, make sure to also cut your oil filters in half and comb them with a magnet to ensure that there is no metallic debris accumulating. If the IMS bearing does deteriorate rapidly, then this is likely a waste of time. But, it helps me sleep at night. :)

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  • 2 months later...

In preparation to do oil change on my 00 C2 using renntech DIY, started to order the SS plug from Sunset and they advised that Porsche doesn't recommend it because it's too strong for the oil pan metal and causes problems. The SS plug is an exhaust plug and only coincidentally is same size as oil pan plug. They would sell it to me but provided the above info and I didn't order it. FYI.

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  • 4 months later...

In preparation to do oil change on my 00 C2 using renntech DIY, started to order the SS plug from Sunset and they advised that Porsche doesn't recommend it because it's too strong for the oil pan metal and causes problems. The SS plug is an exhaust plug and only coincidentally is same size as oil pan plug. They would sell it to me but provided the above info and I didn't order it. FYI.

From personal experience, I have about 15k on a M96 powered Boxster and just under 5k on a M96 powered C2 running LN Engineering's magnetic drain plug without any apparent negative side effects. I'm not sure what problems the plug could cause, as the torque specs are reduced and a copper crush washer is still used. If any magnetic metal shavings were circulating around in my engine, I would prefer they stuck to the magnetic oil drain plug making their existence very easily noticeable at the next oil change rather than have them circulate throughout the motor.

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In preparation to do oil change on my 00 C2 using renntech DIY, started to order the SS plug from Sunset and they advised that Porsche doesn't recommend it because it's too strong for the oil pan metal and causes problems. The SS plug is an exhaust plug and only coincidentally is same size as oil pan plug. They would sell it to me but provided the above info and I didn't order it. FYI.

From personal experience, I have about 15k on a M96 powered Boxster and just under 5k on a M96 powered C2 running LN Engineering's magnetic drain plug without any apparent negative side effects. I'm not sure what problems the plug could cause, as the torque specs are reduced and a copper crush washer is still used. If any magnetic metal shavings were circulating around in my engine, I would prefer they stuck to the magnetic oil drain plug making their existence very easily noticeable at the next oil change rather than have them circulate throughout the motor.

I think the major concern with the stainless plug is the combination of its hardness and that it and the sump cover are dissimilar metals, which leads to other problems (both the OEM drain plug and LN's magnetic units are aluminum, like the sump cover).

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