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Clutch / Ims Bearing Advise For 2003 S


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I have a 2003 Boxster S with 47,000 miles. The dealer inspected it for a DE event and said the clutch was stiff. They said it was a sign that it is worn and will need to be replaced soon. The current clutch has about 27000 miles on it. The engine was replaced by Porsche in 2007 and has about 20,000 miles on it.

1.) Should I purchase the 3 piece kit or the complete kit that replaces virtually everything including the flywheel? The 3 piece is about $470.00. The full kit is around $750.00

2.) While I'm there, I hear I would be nuts not to replace the IMS bearing. Should I just replace the bearing with original Porsche, or should I put out the $600.00 for the L&N ceramic bearing retrofit?

3.) I hear the 987 clutch will fit my 986 engine and is stronger. Should I?

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I have a 2003 Boxster S with 47,000 miles. The dealer inspected it for a DE event and said the clutch was stiff. They said it was a sign that it is worn and will need to be replaced soon. The current clutch has about 27000 miles on it. The engine was replaced by Porsche in 2007 and has about 20,000 miles on it.

1.) Should I purchase the 3 piece kit or the complete kit that replaces virtually everything including the flywheel? The 3 piece is about $470.00. The full kit is around $750.00

2.) While I'm there, I hear I would be nuts not to replace the IMS bearing. Should I just replace the bearing with original Porsche, or should I put out the $600.00 for the L&N ceramic bearing retrofit?

3.) I hear the 987 clutch will fit my 986 engine and is stronger. Should I?

If taking this on yourself:

1.) Sachs Clutch kits can be had cheaper on ebay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/00-04-BOXSTER-S-3-2L-3-2-PORSCHE-SACHS-NEW-CLUTCH-KIT-_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQhashZitem1c128d055aQQitemZ120570316122QQptZMotorsQ5fCarQ5fTruckQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories

Flywheel should be inspected for movement to ensure it's within spec. You should clean up the face while in there.

2.) My money would be spent on the IMS Retrofit if I were in there, I'm not sure an '07 porsche Replacement motor could accept the retrofit though.

3.) News to me, not sure.

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Hi there. Yes, the 987 kit is an "upgrade" for the earlier cars.

As for the IMS retrofit, I'm guessing that your car has the later-style "big bearing" and cover that won't come out of the case unless it's split. Also, there is no "factory" IMS replacement kit. Charles' kit is the only thing available at this time, although I am working on a prototype kit in my garage today (won't be available for several months though).

-Wayne

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Hi there. Yes, the 987 kit is an "upgrade" for the earlier cars.

As for the IMS retrofit, I'm guessing that your car has the later-style "big bearing" and cover that won't come out of the case unless it's split. Also, there is no "factory" IMS replacement kit. Charles' kit is the only thing available at this time, although I am working on a prototype kit in my garage today (won't be available for several months though).

-Wayne

Thanks Wayne. Are you saying that if my car had a rebuilt engine put in it in 2007, that I wouldn't be able to replace the IMS without actually going deep into the engine? There is no longer a removable flange? If so, do you think they addressed the issue enough that I shouldn't be concerned? Love your articles on Pelican BTW.

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Hi there. Yes, the 987 kit is an "upgrade" for the earlier cars.

As for the IMS retrofit, I'm guessing that your car has the later-style "big bearing" and cover that won't come out of the case unless it's split. Also, there is no "factory" IMS replacement kit. Charles' kit is the only thing available at this time, although I am working on a prototype kit in my garage today (won't be available for several months though).

-Wayne

Thanks Wayne. Are you saying that if my car had a rebuilt engine put in it in 2007, that I wouldn't be able to replace the IMS without actually going deep into the engine? There is no longer a removable flange? If so, do you think they addressed the issue enough that I shouldn't be concerned? Love your articles on Pelican BTW.

Thanks for the kudos on the articles!

Yes, the later-style replacement engines had the big nut on the IMS bearing flange, which means that the bearing is too big to get out of the engine case. I wish I had a picture of this with the cover removed, but I don't. I'll see if Charles does...

-Wayne

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I wonder if there is a way to know this without pulling the transmission. Would the dealer that replaced the engine have the record? If it is retrofit-able, I'd like to get the parts and do it all at once so that the cars rear isn't in the air like a cat in heat for 2 weeks. Also is there a clutch kit # for the 987 clutch? I just see separate components online.

Thx,

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One other question. Will the clutch get stiffer as it wears, or is someone full of S?

When I purchased my car, the mechanic explained to me that the "fingers" on the pressure plate wear out and that is what causes the stiffer pedal. It does not mean that the clutch plate is wearing out. If the stiffness of the pedal does not bother you I would just wait until the disk needs to be replaced, unless money is no object.

I am not a mechanic, but figured I would offer my 2 cents.

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I replaced the original clutch on my 2000 S with the Sachs disc/pressure plate/release bearing kit last weekend. I also installed a new pilot bearing, new fork pivot plastic piece and new bolts for the flywheel and pressure plate. I cleaned up the flywheel's friction surface with a 3M Roloc white bristle disc. The clutch pedal feel is very different now, and much better than before. With the original 67,000 mile clutch, the pedal effort was high and the clutch engagement occurred over a pretty short sweep of pedal travel. The high clutch pedal effort and sudden engagement made the car hard to drive smoothly. I detected no slippage on the original clutch, though. Upon disassembly, I noted that the disc rivets were just about to make contact with the pressure plate's friction surface. Interestingly, the rivet ends on the flywheel side of the disc were not as close to making contact with the flywheel as the rivets on the other side. Perhaps that was by design, in order to prevent flywheel damage if the clutch is severely worn. I saw no evidence of broken or cracked fingers on the original pressure plate. With the new clutch installed, the pedal effort is much lighter and the clutch take-up is a lot more progressive, since the engagement takes place over a longer sweep of pedal travel.

Why does a worn clutch disc cause a higher clutch pedal effort? As the disc wears thinner, the angle of the fingers in the diaphragm spring (in the pressure plate) changes. Some of the mechanical advantage in the system is lost, which brings the twin evils of less clamping force and greater pedal effort.

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.....

Why does a worn clutch disc cause a higher clutch pedal effort? As the disc wears thinner, the angle of the fingers in the diaphragm spring (in the pressure plate) changes. Some of the mechanical advantage in the system is lost, which brings the twin evils of less clamping force and greater pedal effort.

Thanks for the clear explanation of how this actually works! :thankyou:

Certainly makes a lot more sense than the "worn fingers" explanation above. :oops:

Regards, Maurice.

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Why does a worn clutch disc cause a higher clutch pedal effort? As the disc wears thinner, the angle of the fingers in the diaphragm spring (in the pressure plate) changes. Some of the mechanical advantage in the system is lost, which brings the twin evils of less clamping force and greater pedal effort.

While that is true, the actual pressure plate springs begin to stretch and wear out too. That is why you can have a perfectly good clutch disc with a bad clutch, because the pressure plate is worn out. When performing a clutch replacement, you should change the disc, the pressure plate, and the throw-out bearing all at once because they all seem to wear at different, but similar intervals.

-Wayne

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