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Was pricing out an extended warranty for my 99 Boxster 5 speed (39,000 miles) today.

Auto Protection has one for $3,500 4 years/50,000 that covers pretty much everything.

They also have a motor, transmission, transaxle and a few more things (basic) for $1,900.

None covers the convertible top and mechanism.

With all the IMS failures I hear about, I'm a little nervous.

BUT... how likely is this failure (or other major failure) likely to happen to me within the next 50k miles?

I won't take it to the track and I drive it fairly easy... but push it sometimes.

I've had the car for 2 months or so and it drives like new, engine runs very smoothly, shifts precisely.

How likely is it I may experience this failure?

An, if I do, will this cost me a new engine?

How much would that cost?

Do I benefit of a higher resale value if I do purchase it?

Your opinion is valued.

Thanks

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Was pricing out an extended warranty for my 99 Boxster 5 speed (39,000 miles) today.

Auto Protection has one for $3,500 4 years/50,000 that covers pretty much everything.

They also have a motor, transmission, transaxle and a few more things (basic) for $1,900.

None covers the convertible top and mechanism.

With all the IMS failures I hear about, I'm a little nervous.

BUT... how likely is this failure (or other major failure) likely to happen to me within the next 50k miles?

I won't take it to the track and I drive it fairly easy... but push it sometimes.

I've had the car for 2 months or so and it drives like new, engine runs very smoothly, shifts precisely.

How likely is it I may experience this failure?

An, if I do, will this cost me a new engine?

How much would that cost?

Do I benefit of a higher resale value if I do purchase it?

Your opinion is valued.

Thanks

No one has hard data on IMS failures, and that's why it scares the hell out of everyone. This is the internet, so keep in mind that 99% come here only to complain. :) I do see some good souls who occasionally post here about how their car is trouble-free after miles and miles. Porsche designed these cars to last, but like every mechanical device ever made there are some common failure modes.

A common anecdote around here is that driving the ***** out of your car will prevent catastrophic failure. There's some justification in that; Porsche's durability testing involves driving the cars hard, and one assumes their tests don't include a man in a tweed cap garaging the car for 18 months at a clip to avoid bug splatter on his windshield. Neglecting any car will ultimately involve failure of some sort due to breakdown of seals, lack of active lubrication, and the odd cobweb, and these cars were designed to run. May I ask, why not take it to track? It's a heckuva good time and safe to boot, try out a DE with your local PCA chapter and learn how to get the most out of your car.

IMS failures are often catastrophic, bent valves and/or high-speed release of bearings inside your motor usually spell a quick death. Plenty of talk about it on all the boards, and a few resident experts will be more than willing to indulge you with sad tales of IMS misfortune. A new engine for your car will probably cost more than the car is worth. Sad but true. In light of that a warranty's not such a bad idea, provided you project the per-mile cost over years of ownership and decide it makes sense in your P-car budget. The alternative is that you look at it as an opportunity to fit a 996 motor for similar money to a 2.5 replacement.

You have no reason to talk about resale value because you're in a car that's just about hit the bottom of its market. All things being equal I'd prefer to buy a car that had a warranty to one that didn't, but don't expect to get your $3500 back when you sell the car. I'd expect your warranty to give your car a $1000-1500 premium over a comparably-equipped car with similar mileage and condition, the day that you purchase it. Buy it for you, not the next owner.

My $.02: Maintain your car, drive it like you stole it, and take the lumps as they come should they happen to you. The reward of owning such a fantastic car as your Boxster should outweigh the risk, provided you're in a financial position to assume that risk.

Enjoy!

Mark

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Would you offer a warranty on a car as old as yours?

Is the intermediate shaft and its bearing one of the named parts that are covered? No. (I choose this as an example of the hidden gotchas in policies like these. A failure of a part not specifically named is not covered in the older car or power train warranty.)

What labor rate will they pay?

Will your mechanic accept their reimbursement rates?

Will they be around to pay when you have a failure?

Have you heard of them paying out on the type of failure you want to have covered?

Extended warranty plans pay out ~30% of what they take in according to multiple sources. Does that sound like a good deal? Casinos pay lots better.

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With all the IMS failures I hear about, I'm a little nervous.

BUT... how likely is this failure (or other major failure) likely to happen to me within the next 50k miles?

I won't take it to the track and I drive it fairly easy... but push it sometimes.

I've had the car for 2 months or so and it drives like new, engine runs very smoothly, shifts precisely.

How likely is it I may experience this failure?

An, if I do, will this cost me a new engine?

How much would that cost?

Do I benefit of a higher resale value if I do purchase it?

Your opinion is valued.

Thanks

The '99's came with a more robust IMS bearing than the 2000 to 2005 cars. The "D" chunk issue seems to be more of a concern with some of the '99's.

Or, if you are still losing sleep about the IMS bearing failure issue, how about instead of purchasing that $3,500 warranty that (as correctly pointed out above by Mike) may not cover much, why not invest in one of the aftermarket fixes for the IMS bearing issue? Spend $2,000 on that car opening it up and installing the more robust IMS bearing and flange that are available from the aftermarket. When it comes time to sell, that investment in the aftermarket fix may make the car more attractive to the next buyer verses having an aftermarket warranty that may not fix anything.

If I had to do it all over again and bought an older Boxster, I'd buy the car, immediatey take it to my trusted shop, have my mechanic install one of the aftermarket fixes, then drive the wheels off of it never worrying about it again.

I could be way off base, but I suspect a new factory motor with installation and the "while you're in there" costs could run you $15,000.

Good luck,

Jay

08 987

90 911

84 911

Edited by Jay H
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Thanks for all of your responses.

When I bought this car, I planned on keeping it "for my son" that is 9 years old, and figured this would be a classic in a few years. I am a mechanical engineer that designs industrial machines, so I truly enjoy great engineering and love to drive this car.

Good point on the IMS/bearing not being specifically mentionned in the covered parts list.

Point also taken on putting in the aftermarket upgrade for it.

I will sleep better tonight :renntech:

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