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I’ve been thinking about installing a Pioneer Double Din stereo in my 2000 C4. I have looked a lot of threads about the install and I don’t think I’ll have any trouble getting the unit installed. What I am worried about is cutting the divider bar between the HVAC control unit and the stock stereo. If I cut the divider out to fit the new stereo, will it be possible for me to ever reinstall the stock stereo and return the HVAC unit to their original locations? I’d like to be able to return the car to stock when I am ready to sell in a few years.

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I've been thinking about installing a Pioneer Double Din stereo in my 2000 C4. I have looked a lot of threads about the install and I don't think I'll have any trouble getting the unit installed. What I am worried about is cutting the divider bar between the HVAC control unit and the stock stereo. If I cut the divider out to fit the new stereo, will it be possible for me to ever reinstall the stock stereo and return the HVAC unit to their original locations? I'd like to be able to return the car to stock when I am ready to sell in a few years.

i did this mod - and I don't think it's possible.

Then again, I don't know many people that would prefer the old antiquated setup.

I love having Nav and Bluetooth hands free phone connection like a modern car should.

My sister with a 997 Turbo with PCM DOESN'T EVEN have bluetooth!! I don't know why Porsche is so behind with this stuff.

Ok here's my DIY link:

http://www.renntech....e-din-headunit/

Edited by roadsession

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I agree, why anyone would want the horrible stock unit the Porsche supplies, I don’t know. I do know that there are a lot of Porsche purists out there and they want everything to be the same as when the car came from the factory. That's why I’d like to be able to return it to stock if needed.

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I agree, why anyone would want the horrible stock unit the Porsche supplies, I don't know. I do know that there are a lot of Porsche purists out there and they want everything to be the same as when the car came from the factory. That's why I'd like to be able to return it to stock if needed.

I think with the 996 and 997, that era is gone. Those purists are far and away a minority.

The older Porsches, yes - but 996 and 997 are daily drivers with great utility, etc. and low cost.

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I agree, why anyone would want the horrible stock unit the Porsche supplies, I don't know. I do know that there are a lot of Porsche purists out there and they want everything to be the same as when the car came from the factory. That's why I'd like to be able to return it to stock if needed.

Or buy the PCM double-din bracket. Probably 996.552.231.12 or something like that. Appears to be available for about $55.

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I would like to go the other way. I have the stock CDR220 and the cup holders in my car. I picked up the horseshoe trim in dark wood but it is a double DIN unit. I would like to convert it to the single DIM configuration. Does Porsche have a piece for this? I should add that this is for a 2000.

Edited by Dharn55

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I would like to go the other way. I have the stock CDR220 and the cup holders in my car. I picked up the horseshoe trim in dark wood but it is a double DIN unit. I would like to convert it to the single DIM configuration. Does Porsche have a piece for this? I should add that this is for a 2000.

Are you asking about the trim piece or the internal support frame? In any case, yes, there are part numbers for every one of those pieces. See Illustration 809-02 in the parts catalog "Dashboard lining with retaining frame". The support frames are as above, 996.552.231.xx, where xx = 11 for standard, 13 for M662 option, and 12 for M665 option. The switch trim is 996.552.967.xx, with a bunch of options for color/material.

Edited by gnetwerker

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It sounds like I had some of the same thoughts and concerns you bring up.

In the end I came up with a very different solution than I planned in the beginning. Sorry this post is long, but you may be interested in how I did this and my reasoning.

What I wanted:

Sat Nav, satellite radio, and hands-free Bluetooth connectivity--all without a rubbish looking aftermarket solution. The Double Din Pioneer units you mention looked like viable options. However, upon further investigation I could see some potential problems down the road, which included the issues you raise.

The Problems:

(1) I was a bit uncomfortable about giving $2,500 to some run-of-the-mill shops with uncertain skills so they could thrash about under my dash. The high end shops with clear experience doing this to Porsches were even more expensive.

(2) It appeared enough hacking was required it would be difficult to go back to OEM---something that does matter to many people. Moreover, the installation options suggested by several experts placed the re-located controls in less optimal positions.

(3) To me the biggest issue is that I have come to believe even the high end Pioneer systems may soon become antiquated and need to be replaced with something very different---or perhaps worse, just wind up cluttering the dash like a 21st century version of the old 8-track players from the '70s. Specifically, I'm thinking about the emergence of Google Navigation for cell phones, Pandora, and voice command apps.

My Solution:

The key weakness of using a cell phone for such applications is rapid battery drain and I did not want to use an ugly cigarette lighter mounted phone charger with its unsightly wires always dangling over the controls. To get around this, it was easy to pull the radio and place clamp-on splice jumpers on the switched power leads without cutting any wires or altering any cable harnesses. With the functioning radio back in the dash I fed the DC voltage source to a small phone charger that I secured under the dash. A very simple adaptation of a $10 snap-in belt clamp for my phone allowed me to mount the phone in a convenient and visually pleasing location on the dash. Even though it mounts very securely I can pull the mount on or off the dash without any dash modifications and it doesn't require any of those awkward and ugly aftermarket solutions (suction cups, clips, clamps, widgets that plug into the cigarette lighter, glue, magnets, or rubbish that precariously clips objects on the vents). The coiled power line to the phone is very unobtrusive when in use and retracts out of sight when not in use. For short trips I usually don't plug it in. In order to gain wireless access to the audio system I use a Motorola T505 bluetooth adapter. It works very well, is quite small, and mounts wirelessly on the the sunvisor. When sitting behind the wheel one doesn't really even notice it. With an overnight charge I find it works for many weeks.

The result:

When I get in the car I snap my Android phone in the bracket and touch a button to activate the Bluetooth adapter. The phone automatically handles the satellite navigation and speaks through the car audio system. I used to pay for X-M satellite radio because I like the variety and hate commercial-laden radio. On this basis Pandora is superior and free (or nearly so). If a call comes in while Pandora is running, it will pause until the call is done. At least with my phone, the sound quality is quite good. Similarly, when Google Navigation starts to speak, Pandora automatically pauses and then resumes when the navigator is done speaking. An inexpensive voice-confirming Android app allows me to voice dial for outgoing calls. Google is frequently sending out automatic cost-free upgrades for the navigation app. Moreover, since one is linked to the web, information is always automatically updated and a street-view of your destination pops up as you approach. The radio and CD player still work with a touch of a button.

In the end for less than $100 it was possible to configure a clean system that has few drawbacks and in several ways is superior to a >$2,500 "Pioneer solution". Perhaps most important to me is that the dash remains uncluttered and completely OEM. The capabilities of cell phones to do the work of these big, expensive in-dash Nav/audio/bluetooth systems changes by the month. No car maker or aftermarket audio system manufacturer can keep up with this pace. In a couple of months I will get a new phone that will be much faster and have many more voice options. You should be able to do the same thing with any other standard smart phone. When I do upgrade, all I'll have to do is get a new belt clip for the phone and I'll be set--and I won't have deal with any dinosaurs in the dash.

Hope this is helpful. If you need more details please let me know.

Dave

I've been thinking about installing a Pioneer Double Din stereo in my 2000 C4. I have looked a lot of threads about the install and I don't think I'll have any trouble getting the unit installed. What I am worried about is cutting the divider bar between the HVAC control unit and the stock stereo. If I cut the divider out to fit the new stereo, will it be possible for me to ever reinstall the stock stereo and return the HVAC unit to their original locations? I'd like to be able to return the car to stock when I am ready to sell in a few years.

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I've been thinking about installing a Pioneer Double Din stereo in my 2000 C4. I have looked a lot of threads about the install and I don't think I'll have any trouble getting the unit installed. What I am worried about is cutting the divider bar between the HVAC control unit and the stock stereo. If I cut the divider out to fit the new stereo, will it be possible for me to ever reinstall the stock stereo and return the HVAC unit to their original locations? I'd like to be able to return the car to stock when I am ready to sell in a few years.

I upgraded to a Pioneer AVIC D-3 with a back-up camera and blue tooth adaptor about 3 years ago. I found a replacement center vent if I ever decide to go back to stock.

d6d1_35.jpg

Edited by kbrandsma

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Dave,

Do you have a picture of your cell-phone setup? I have a solution now for GPS and audio, but I wouldn't mind adding a mount for my Blackberry and was looking for ideas.

I did something similar with a Garmin GPS and it also looks and works quite well. In my case I made my own mount for the GPS right above the 1st storage tray and wired power and audio into the stock radio. No visible wires and the mounting is completely hidden. With a 32Gig SD card I now have all of my music available at a touch of a button and since the GPS has bluetooth it also provides hands-free calling. The added bonus is that I can reach the GPS touch screen without lifting my hand off-of the stick :-)

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I wanted to post to this topic to help others considering a double din navigation receiver installation for a 996. My 996 had the old school tape deck which was crapped out. So I purchased the Euro Motorspeed double din kit from ebay, a Kenwood dnx 6960 from Crutchfield, and an upper console storage shelf from Suncoast. I was a bit anxious about cutting the dash up, but the end result looks fantastic and I would not hesitate to do it again.

The tech support guy (Loi?) at Euro Motorspeed was a huge help. I had a couple of questions and he quickly replied to my emails. Also there is a series of 7 jpegs detailing the installation (but for a 986?) at the DIY tutorial section of rentech that was helpful. Also this post: http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php/topic/19074-new-dvd-navigation-install/page__st__260 and http://forums.rennlist.com/rennforums/996-forum/514654-double-din-install-euro-motorspeed.html and http://www.6speedonline.com/forums/996-turbo-gt2/203750-relocating-c-control-unit-2.html

One thing I figured out was the AC control unit can be located on the top or bottom of the lower console, but only the lower position does not require custom cutting. Others point out that the AC control on the bottom means it is blocked by the shifter more than it would be if the unit was in the upper position. This may be true but the access issue is insigificant in my experience so go the easy route and put the AC control in the lower position.

Hope this helps somebody!

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Yes, please post some pics. Also, how does the finish/color of the Euro Motorspeed's faceplate match up with the Porsche stock and the Kenwood unit? I'm also looking at the Kenwood unit and would also like to hear about your first impressions.

Thanks and nice job!

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Oh, and don't forget to tape off that wire that attaches to the metal tab on the left side of the back of the original radio "cage". I reconnected it, and it kept triggering my alarm...which had me baffled!

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I like the above picture; that is what I am looking to complete.

I have a 2003 C4S and I am looking to install a double DIN unit ( maybe a Kenwood 9140) and an amplifier. I concluded that wiring the Kenwood 9140 directly to the Bose speakers may not be a great plan so I will get an amplifier too.

Unfortunately my C4S has a fiber optic bus (the MOST) and a BOSE amplifier (in the trunk, next to the spare) that complicates the install. I can overcome the mechanical challanges (cut, manufacture new brackets, buy new covers ....) but I would like to retain the wiring from the BOSE amplifier to the speakers.

I plan to install a new amplifier and pull wires from the new double DIN unit to this amplifier (how many channels?; maybe 4 but I counted 6 sets of speakers in the car).

Bottom line is that I need the audio wiring for the existing 2003 C4S so I can keep the re-wiring to a minimum plus to correctly connect the new amplifier and the double DIN unit .

Let me know if you can help.

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