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Removal & Installation of Dash Strips (how to pic


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Removal & Installation of Dash Strips (how to pic


Ok here is the deal with removing these things..... 1. First you must remove Both AC Vents, and the Upper Center Console... The strips are held in from screws behind the dash, but reaching them is a waist of time! 2. The 2 small strips will pop out with some force, just take a flat head screwdriver and tap it in behind the strip. The screws will pop out from the back of the dash... The dash is a hard plastic material and the screw heads are small so they will come right through th

 

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  • 2 months later...
  • 2 months later...

Hi Kevin, on the dash strips.... I will give it a go this weekend and take before and after shots. I appears from the link that the pieces are no longer useable after removed (broken?) - I was planning to get them repainted. Do you or anyone else know if these could be removed in a manner so that they could be re-used (without removing the whole dash...) ? Thanks

Edited by turbosteve
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Steve, from my experienece I have heard of one other guy that was able to get the screws out from the back.. I tried and lost patience.. Its very very difficult.. Just buy a extra set and have them painted.. there inexpensive.. Lets see pics when your done!

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  • 1 year later...

BTW I figured I would comment since I have done the mod and noticed some important additions needed

If you take off the vents and work from the passenger vent with a flat head screwdriver prying off it will pop out and or break. Then you can push the screws back through the holes and pry in that groove and break along the way till you're done. Follow this process from the passenger side as you have removed the center trim and then from the drivers side on the last piece by the drivers vent

NOW the most important part. PUSH all the areas around the holes back down as they create ridges around the holes and will not let the piece fit flush. Then use clear silicone with a Q tip to spread the silicone along the grove and insert the new pieces

The result :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

One twist that saves a bit of time is instead of "peeling" the layer off the strip is to get the new strip, align its screw holes over the old strip, mark with a felt tip pen and drill throught the layer at each screw hole location. Then, use the soldering iron as noted above. :)

post-1311-1111858921_thumb.jpg

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One twist that saves a bit of time is instead of "peeling" the layer off the strip is to get the new strip, align its screw holes over the old strip, mark with a felt tip pen and drill throught the layer at each screw hole location. Then, use the soldering iron as noted above. :)

I went ahead and bought the Aluminum dash strips from Suncoast Porsche about $130, then had Porsche install them for $424. I also asked for the original parts back to make sure they did not do it this way. No offense, but if you got this option when you bought the car it would have cost $700+

This information is just for those who may not want to venture messing around near the leather dash (TT).

They did a very nice job.

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  • 2 months later...

I just want to report that I have completed the three piece dash trim strip mod with carbon fiber. I was able to reach all the torx screws without pulling them out. Removing the steering wheel and the upper center console was NOT required. I did remove both air duct end pieces for access. I also removed the instrument panel and the "horseshoe" under the steering colume. You also have to remove the air duct under the dash on both sides for access but this is easy.

The whole project is time consuming and at times frustrating, but suprizingly doable.

I may provide a writeup in the future if people are interested. It can be done because I just did it.

Mark

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I just want to report that I have completed the three piece dash trim strip mod with carbon fiber.  I was able to reach all the torx screws without pulling them out.  Removing the steering wheel and the upper center console was NOT required.  I did remove both air duct end pieces for access.  I also removed the instrument panel and the "horseshoe" under the steering colume.  You also have to remove the air duct under the dash on both sides for access but this is easy.

The whole project is time consuming and at times frustrating, but suprizingly doable.

I may provide a writeup in the future if people are interested.  It can be done because I just did it.

Mark

Do you have a later car with a glove box? If so, did you remove the glove box to get to the screws?
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Loren,

No. I have a 2000 Boxster S. I thought the long AIRBAG piece was the second easiest to do. The simple one is to the right of the steering wheel. Once you remove the instrument pod and remove the two torx screws on the top of the "horseshoe" which then pulls up and off there is clear access to the small piece to the right. The piece under the ignition switch had to be done ( I discovered the hard way) from the driver side airduct which houses the light switch. This was reached with a small rachet and torx. It's all about proper angle of your driver on the screw head which is difficult because you can't see it, only feel the screw head

The long piece is reachable from the car seat reaching under the dash with the cover panel and snap in air duct( under the dash) removed. You can't see the screws from this postion but can actually easily touch or feel the screw heads. The hard part is getting the torx driver in the precise horizontal and verticle level eg. Dead on straight. It's frustrating the be able to readily feel the screw head but not get the head of the driver to "seat"

Mark

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Loren, I'm a guitar player with long skinny fingers. I guess that helped. More than anything I saw this project as a challenge and I love challenges. I was prepared to use Kevin's method and just couldn't bring myself to do it without trying the conventional method.

To be honest. Kevins method is probably just as effective and faster if you can stomach the procedure. I have no idea why Porsche used the torx screws as the small tips on each strip and mere pressure of the dash holds them in tight. I did NOT replace the screws (did save them as a trophy) because that would be foolish and I also now could replace/change these strips easily if desired.

Mark

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  • 1 month later...

Just to extend this thread a little, I removed/replaced these three trim strips in my '03 986S yesterday. The points I'd like to add are the following:

If you have an '03 or newer, with the glove box, then you really don't need to undergo the tear-out/solder-iron method. The glove box comes out by first removing the under-dash footwell cover. This is accomplished by removing three plastic screws that hold the foam-like cover in place. Then, remove the torx screws that hold the glove box in place. They are T20, and my memory is that there were about seven of them. Disconnect the glove box light at the connecter and the whole box comes out as an assembly.

By contorting your body into the footwell, you get good access to the seven (!) T10 screws that hold the longer trim piece in place.

(Bear in mind that there is a metal reinforcement that runs nearly the entire length of the longer strip that also acts as a back plate for the screws. This may only be for the glove-box-equipped cars like mine. If you use the solder iron method to melt the screws out, there is no way you are pulling them through; they'll just fall back into the dash.)

For the remaining, smaller trim pieces, I followed Mark's procedure: Removed the gauge cluster, steering wheel 'horseshoe' and driver's a/c vent. I also had the radio and hvac control box out of the car (because I was concurrently installing rear speakers).

To facilitate getting at some of the screws, I highly advise using a tiny ratchet like a Craftsman that I bought at Sears; it holds 1/4" driver bits, with a handle that is about 4" long. That ratchet with a T10 bit and an inspection mirror made it possible for me (I'm not a guitar player like Mark)....you still need plenty of patience.

During the hours it took me to do this, I tried to imagine why Porsche used 11 screws to hold these 3 trim pieces in place. I mean, the whole car seems to snap together, so why so much mechanical fastening every 3-4 inches? The only thing I could come up with is that in an accident, these pieces probably need to stay in place, or break in a predetermined fashion (take a good look at a cross-section of these pieces, they are not solid), to prevent impinging themselves upon a body part....something to consider for those of you that used silicone.....I have no way of knowing; I'm just saying.

I have a black interior, with lots of aluminum-look trim that came standard on my S. The pieces I installed are also alumimum-look (not arctic silver) that I purchased from Suncoast for about $170. They really improve the look of the dash; the time spent was well worth it.

--Brian

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  • 3 months later...

Reading the posts in this thread gave me the confidence to attempt and complete this mod today. The combination of methods made this a reasonable undertaking. With much patience, I was able to remove and replace all of the required screws. As previously stated, it is a major PITA. But it sure looks good when you're finished.

I'd like to thank everyone for their posts here. :thumbup:

Dwayne

Edited by dwaynemosley
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  • 1 month later...

i did this swap about 3 weeks ago

there is NO question in my mind that the money trick is using a soldering iron to pop the screws "back"

that being said, make sure you get all the screws out of the dash so they dont rattle while driving like they did for me.

whoever had this idea for the iron is a genius.

if anyone neds any guidance feel free to pm me.

the new dash strips look MUCH nicer

i have mine in arcitve silver to match the exterior.

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i did this swap about 3 weeks ago

there is NO question in my mind that the money trick is using a soldering iron to pop the screws "back"

that being said, make sure you get all the screws out of the dash so they dont rattle while driving like they did for me.

whoever had this idea for the iron is a genius.

if anyone neds any guidance feel free to pm me.

the new dash strips look MUCH nicer

i have mine in arcitve silver to match the exterior.

I've been called a lot of things, and genius isn't on of them :thumbup:

Glad it worked for you!

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  • 4 months later...

Hi All,

I know this is a really old post but just wanted to add.

I have took all 3 strips off tonight with ease, Unscrewed them and not damaged them.

It was easy, you have to bend yourself a bit, but I have big hands and managed to do it.

Just painting them in artic silver now

Cheers

Russ

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  • 2 weeks later...
Hi All,

I know this is a really old post but just wanted to add.

I have took all 3 strips off tonight with ease, Unscrewed them and not damaged them.

It was easy, you have to bend yourself a bit, but I have big hands and managed to do it.

Just painting them in artic silver now

Cheers

Russ

I would also like to add that there is no need to damage the strips to remove them. A few weeks ago I was half way through the job only to find the replacement strips were for a LH drive car and mine is RH drive so the job was stopped. On my second attempt it seemed so easy to do because I knew how it should be done and all the tricks to remove the various dash parts!

My tip not already mentioned in this thread is to use a 'flexible shaft' screwdriver with a T10 bit which you feed up from the footwell and guide onto the screwheads with your fingers at the top.

Edited by Mark G
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  • 4 weeks later...
Just a quick question...How did you get the driver side vent out? I can't seem to get to the screw that holds it in place as I am trying to change my headlight switch (not turning on headlights). Thanks.

From what I recall the only screws are the two on the side, and also another one that is in the right corner behind that headlight switch your trying to replace. Once those are out, it does take some effort to pull it out. Hope this helps

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  • 11 months later...

Just did this upgrade. After reading all the posts, I decided I wanted to challenge myself to doing it to full factory specs without breaking any pieces and using all the screws to put the trim back in. I started with the long piece on the passenger side. First remove the underdash cover (foam) held in place with 3 plastic screws. Then remove the glovebox:

img_5148.jpg

img_5141.jpg

There really isn't any need to remove the vent since there is plenty of room back there:

img_5142.jpg

With the screws out the piece just pops out:

img_5144.jpg

Contort yourself under the dash (move the seat back as far as possible!) and you'll be able to clearly see the screws:

img_5143.jpg

img_5146.jpg

img_5147.jpg

Next, remove the instrument cluster by first removing the hazard switch:

img_5156.jpg

and the microphone cover:

img_5157.jpg

then remove the two screws and the whole assembly pulls off (makes sure to disconnect the cluster in the back (3 plugs: gray, blue and green as wells as the mic and hazard switch)

img_5149.jpg

remove the lower "horseshoe" around the steering column (screws are visible once cluster pod is out) and then you have access to the back of the trim pieces on either side of the column. I removed the driver's side vent but I don't think it's really necessary. Got all the pieces off without any damage and installed the new pieces with every single screw:

img_5153.jpg

All buttoned up:

img_5160.jpg

All in all it took me about two hours from start to finish going slowly and carefully to protect the full leather dash:

img_5162.jpg

Use the right tools and take your time!

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