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Hi, I bought my Cayenne S about 2 months ago and just had the oil change done and was informed the front brakes were getting very close to the sensors touching the rotors. So I got a quote of $854 to have them done. Well I know how to do my own repairs and priced the parts from a Dealer for $576 (pads, rotors, sensors, hardware kit) shipped to me. Checking Autohauz I can get the rotors, pads, sensors and hardware kit for just under $300. The rotors and pads are Bosch Quiecast. Are any of you familiar with the quality or used the Bosch? I am not opposed to getting the parts from the dealer but if the Bosch are just as good I will go with those. I just don't want to spend the money and have squeaks or rattles. Any and all input is apprecciated. Thanks, Jeff

Edited by bigfoot68
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White, Sunset is actually who I contacted. I don't know for sure that I need new rotors, I just want to get an idea of the entire cost I may be looking at. I am going to try and measure how much material is left on the rotor this weekend. I have heard and read that the rotors need replacing with the pads, but I think that is nuts.

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Just as an FYI....the allowable limit of wear on the front rotors is so marginal almost everytime you do a pad replacement, rotors generall have to be done as well if your using OEM pad compound.

Personally i went with stoptech (owned by centric)......pads again i went with stoptech.

I was personally very leary with centric quality....but i got the rotors and pads and i was somewhat pleased.

Pads were GREAT....very low dust and i didn't sacrafice a ton of brake feel (they are softer on initial bite, but if i need to lay into them, they brake just as hard, with no fade)

ROTORS....the big difference is the rotor hat quality....casting was rougher and was not zinc coated.....basically they get a rust film immediately....simple solution was to spray some black paint on the hats.

Overall i think i spent a little over 300 bucks and have been super happy ever since....only thing that annoys me is the pad clunk that other have talked about....not sure why it started after the new pads, but it never did it before i changed over the pads.

Hope this helps.

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You dont give any more info on the car, MY / Mileage, but if the brake warning goes off front, then you may be in luck because you can get 2 pad changes on a set of rotors for sure (although people will disagree) It really depends on the mileage you have done

1st change front about 38K,

2nd change front with Rotors about 70K

1st change rear about 60K

2nd change with Rotors about 120K

This is not a guess, I did this on my S and it was fine as a DD, not a racer (well sometimes maybe)

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sound like NO would be the answer unless it was dealer maintained in which case they would have been

With no knowledge about service history I would prepare to change the fronts including rotors. Its not a bad job, the rear rotors are another problem

If you can get release oil in there a few days prior you will be doing yourself a big favor because the pins will be stuck solid by now, get a decent punch and a big hammer haha

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You dont give any more info on the car, MY / Mileage, but if the brake warning goes off front, then you may be in luck because you can get 2 pad changes on a set of rotors for sure (although people will disagree) It really depends on the mileage you have done

Porsche spec is 2mm of rotor wear....which is pretty crazy....but when you start to look at the available thickness....there isn't a lot there for a car that weighs as much as a Cayenne (fronts new are 34mm thick) compared to say a GTI 337 which is a 30mm rotor.

I wouldn't go by mileage for wearable items like rotors/pads.....i've replaced my brakes 4 times now and i only have 86k.....but because it was a SanFran car, it's more understandable.

If you can get release oil in there a few days prior you will be doing yourself a big favor because the pins will be stuck solid by now, get a decent punch and a big hammer haha

Mudman is correct here.....the fronts will be super easy....and the pins in the front generally aren't "crazy." But when you get to the rear.....these pins are basically interference fit NEW, so with the gunk and whatnot on them, they basically won't come out.....i "cleaned" the pins prior to hitting them out, so i didn't ovalize the aluminum hole.

If you look under my name or the DIY section, i did a writeup with pictures and a tool list for the rear brake replacement. The front's had been covered by another person in the DIY section.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I just had Sunset replace pads and rotors on my 2004 Turbo for a little under $1700 including new sensors. If there are squeeks or anything else it's there problem.

If you can afford the vehicle, you can afford the cost of maintence. Keep your ride 100% correct. If you put on discount parts or do it wrong you will forget all you saved long before you forget the problems. If you do it yourself who do you take it back to if something isn't right?

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I just had Sunset replace pads and rotors on my 2004 Turbo for a little under $1700 including new sensors. If there are squeeks or anything else it's there problem.

If you can afford the vehicle, you can afford the cost of maintence. Keep your ride 100% correct. If you put on discount parts or do it wrong you will forget all you saved long before you forget the problems. If you do it yourself who do you take it back to if something isn't right?

i agree with keeping everything 100%. But here's the thing, 1700 dollars is tossing cash down the drain IMO....Not only are they charging you a very high part margin, but they charge you for the job hours on top of that.

Part margin is out of control with Porsche....if you buy through a certain dealer out on the westcoast, they do +15%.....which tends to work out to being about 50% off standard dealerships.

I do all my own work, everything from gauging and blueprinting motors, to basic oil changes and brake jobs.....much of what i do isn't rocket science, it just takes some time and a willingness to learn. I trust about 2 people to work on my cars (one of them being me).

Be honest with yourself as well.....oil changes and brakes are not done by the Porsche Master Mechanics......so more than likely you got someone much less experienced messing around with your car.

It's all about how effecient we are with our money, not how much we spend....if you want to toss a 50% margin to Porsche, please go ahead....your donations help Porsche, which susidizes the cost on things for me.

Thanks

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  • 5 months later...

thought I would resurrect this post. I have an 08 CTT. Bought it almost two years ago with 18K miles on it (and the pads had been replaced) and now it has 35K miles. I mainly drive on surface streets. And they squeal like crazy when I apply pressure to stop. In fact, during slow driving, I actually can hear them lightly squeal. I was just in at my dealer recently for unrelated work and was told that I was going to be due to change front/rear rotors & pads. I had a few questions:

1) do CTT brakes squeal a lot regardless? (they are not ceramic) will a new brake job get rid of the squealing?

2) are there different pads and/or rotors that I should consider or are OEM fine?

3) I'm not a DIY type so I will need professional help. I understand that just the front rotors & pads will run about $500 in parts alone. Any good indie shops on the SF peninsula someone can recommend?

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My recommendations for you would be:

1. If you think you have spare $500 or so, go with a known indie shop to do this for you. They will charge you a lot of $$$ to do something that anyone who can turn a screwdriver can do easily, given some time.

2. If you would prefer to save yourself the money, go to step 3.

3. Get familiar with the parts involved in rotor/pad brake replacement (really, only have rotors, pads, sensors, several bolts/screws - less that half dozen for each wheel).

4. Get familiar with what tools you would need to do this job

  • floor jack to lift each wheel as you do the job
  • socket + wrench to undo wheels
  • triple square socket/star tool to undo 2 screws on rear rotor - plus socket wrench to help in the process
  • socket to undo pads hardware + calipers
  • brake clean spray
  • paper towels
  • gloves to keep your hands a little cleaner when handling tires
  • some needle nose pliers if needed, thin screwdriver (if doing rear rotors, to align some holes and to set rear brake)
  • flash light

5. Set some time aside (1 day) to not rush and do each wheel on your time schedule - recommend doing in pairs if not have enough time to do all 4 together

6. Find DIY article on here for rotor/pad DIY

7. Find and buy replacement parts...for front, will likely cost you about $350 for rotors and pads - if you get ceramic they will not squeak, but will work better when heated up - initial bite not as good. Sensors will be another $25/pair - replace them as the old ones will be used and brittle even if not ground down....will spare you aggravation of taking car apart and then having to put it back to wait for new sensors to arrive.

8. Study parts you bought to make sure you know what needs to be replaced

9. Do the DIY! It is one of the easiest things one can do on any car, and gives you an insight into how it all works. You get to know the mechanics, understand how things need to work together for proper function, and will allow you to detect when the car is not performing the way it should, if something goes wrong in that part of the car. This is the part where you 'get in tune or get to feel the car'. Trust me, it is well worth knowing this.

After you do the DIY, your brakes will not squeal, and you will have some extra money to spend on something else, or to buy your wife/GF a present.

Let us know which way you will go, we will cheer you on to do this on your own if you need a confidence boost.

thought I would resurrect this post. I have an 08 CTT. Bought it almost two years ago with 18K miles on it (and the pads had been replaced) and now it has 35K miles. I mainly drive on surface streets. And they squeal like crazy when I apply pressure to stop. In fact, during slow driving, I actually can hear them lightly squeal. I was just in at my dealer recently for unrelated work and was told that I was going to be due to change front/rear rotors & pads. I had a few questions:

1) do CTT brakes squeal a lot regardless? (they are not ceramic) will a new brake job get rid of the squealing?

2) are there different pads and/or rotors that I should consider or are OEM fine?

3) I'm not a DIY type so I will need professional help. I understand that just the front rotors & pads will run about $500 in parts alone. Any good indie shops on the SF peninsula someone can recommend?

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  • 3 weeks later...

ciaka, thanks for your detailed suggestions. I had to smile when I read your post. I think you would instill a ton of confidence in anyone who decides to do this themselves.

unfortunately, its just something I'm just not prepared to do right now. I need to find an indie shop right now.....but your info will come in handy for anyone who is interested!

so, any good indie shops anyone can recommend on the SF bay area peninsula? anyone use Junipero Serra Porsche & Benz?

Edited by TurboLove
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An excellent indy shop I've taken my '04 Cayenne S to in the SF Bay Area is: Pro Shop in San Rafael. 58 Irwin Street. Tel: 415/454-2966

German-owner, Vots, used to race 911's back in the day. He has all the official diagnostic tools, reasonable pricing and is a direct and straightforward person.

I bought my Cayenne used (Certified Pre-Owned) and also like Sonnen Porsche (official dealer) in Mill Valley -- it's where I purchased the vehicle. Dealer service pricing is, in my opinion, higher then it needs to be. Vots and his team do not wash your vehicle or shuttle you around town but they get the job done properly and efficiently with no surprises.

I live nearby so it's convenient but for folks that live in San Francisco you can get to the Larkspur ferry and the San Rafael bus terminal is a block away. I usually drop off really early (key slot) and take a commuter bus to SF to work and then bus or ferry back to pick-up the vehicle.

Vots was recommended by a friend who has his vintage and modern Porsche's serviced there. I'm very pleased I now know about Vots and the Pro Shop. He gets positive recommendations/reviews from others as well.

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Besides using a good pad also check with your installer on doing the proper break-in or your new pads. Most manufacturers have similar procedures, some (4 to 6) 50~60mph stops to 10~20mph without coming to a complete stop then continuing a few miles so the brakes can cool while driving. After that take it easy if you can for the first 100 miles or so.

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