Jump to content

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)
aehsani

996 GT3 oil temperature

Recommended Posts

I am not certain that this has been discussed in the past. Nevertheless I would like the revisit this issue:

Is there anyway to gain any info on oil temperature while driving with the use of the onbaord computer on the instrument panel in 996 Porsche? The reason I ask this, is that coolant temperature does not always reflect oil temperature, particularly when the engine has not sufficiently warmed up. Under these circumstances, the oil temperture lags far behind the coolant temperature.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
    You can remove these ads by becoming a Contributing Member.

Thanks Loren.

Durametric seems to be too cumbersome and not practical. Is there an equivalent "Torque Pro app" for I Phone? Further, where do you get the Bluetooth OBD adaptor?

Ali

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the Bluetooth OBD 2 transmitter just go to Amazon.com and search automotive for "bluetooth obd2".

There is a similar app for iPhone but I have not seen it or used it -- here is there website: http://devtoaster.com/products/rev/

I think this app is WiFi only so on Amazon you would search for "wifi obd2".

Worst case you could always buy a used Android phone (no sim card needed for the app) and just use it for that. I have seen some pretty nice used android phones for as little as $5.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AFAIK Torque doesn't read the protected areas of the Porsche DMEs (such as oil temp).

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for responses and helpful suggestions. The rationale for my initial post was based on the premise well articulated in the Porsche manuals, as Porsche advises us not to exceed 4200 RPM until the engine has reached the optimal operating temperature. In 996 cars (M96 and GT1-based engines), the only available indication for normal operating range is coolant temperature gauge. In 997 and Cayenne (and perhaps other newer models), there are two temp gauges: coolant and oil. I have observed consistent temporal differences between coolant and oil temp gauges in both of my cars (997 turbo and Cayenne TT), with the oil temp rise always follows the coolant temp regardless of ambient temperture (in colder weather the difference is larger).

So the question is which one is more reliable reflection of engine operating temperature in early stages of driving, or does it really matter?

Edited by aehsani

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is about 10 Km/6 miles normally driving at 3.000 RPM required with an outside temperature of 15° C/60° F to get the engine oil temperature at 90°C/195° F. which is the definition of a hot engine. This i have repeatedly determined by measuring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks everyone for responses and helpful suggestions. The rationale for my initial post was based on the premise well articulated in the Porsche manuals, as Porsche advises us not to exceed 4200 RPM until the engine has reached the optimal operating temperature. In 996 cars (M96 and GT1-based engines), the only available indication for normal operating range is coolant temperature gauge. In 997 and Cayenne (and perhaps other newer models), there are two temp gauges: coolant and oil. I have observed consistent temporal differences between coolant and oil temp gauges in both of my cars (997 turbo and Cayenne TT), with the oil temp rise always follows the coolant temp regardless of ambient temperture (in colder weather the difference is larger).So the question is which one is more reliable reflection of engine operating temperature in early stages of driving, or does it really matter?

Oil temp is the most important of the two. Because these cars use an oil to water oil cooler system, and the fact that oil will always take longer to warm up, the oil temp will always lag the coolant until everything is at full temp. Then the oil will always be hotter than the coolant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have done a substantial amount of data logging on my 996. I have observed exactly the same as described by RFM and JFP.

Always drive the car at moderate (easy) pace for 6-10 miles or so before goosing it.

I have noticed when running the high speed fans in cool temps, the oil temp can actually dip below coolant, but rarely under normal running will oil match coolant or oil go below coolant.

Coolant (water) always reacts much more quickly than oil.

The oil temp is rarely 20F higher or lower than indicated coolant temp, although there are situations where it can be 30 or 40 deg difference.

My engine really likes 5w50. :)

If you are concerned about getting the most accurate temp possible (although the gauge in engine is farily accurate), you can plumb a manual gauge off various adapters that go inline with the oil filter (at least on a 996/997).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's odd no one mentions the fact that with a Gt3 oil cooler system the 'oil cooler' initially operates as an oil heater just moments after starting the engine before becoming an oil cooler. This apply's to both the gearbox and engine oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I am a little late to the party, but if your primary concern is knowing when the engine oil is warmed up but don't need an exact temperature you can use the oil pressure gauge. When the pressure drops to around 2 bar at idle the oil will be at or near operating temperature. This is the method I use.

Cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that is reasonable. Used similar technique in the "old cars" that actually had an oil temperature gauge. Preferred to see a drop off in pressure along with a rise in temperature.

OT; the Harley Evolution engines didn't like to be twisted until they warmed up. (in fact none of them do)

Most base gasket leaks were due to ham fisted "get on it and romp the heck out it" owners.

I've always allowed for a gentle warm up period holding rpms to a minimum until I see the pressure gauge drop and judging by the heat in the heads (put a glove hand on them while riding) I know it's warmed up. My particular bike is 16 years old and dry as popcorn.

As for the many Nortons and Triumphs it didn't much matter. They leaked no matter what I tried. :huh:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.