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logray

M96/7 Polyvinyl Chloride Rear Main Seal Installation Tool

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This was originally posted by Shark Attack (primarily rennlist.com), but I think it is important to duplicate the info in case it gets lost. The original thread is here with many edits and updates by Shark and myself. Shark used wood stops but I later went in and used a pvc insert as a stop (and ultimately a flat cap).

http://reutterwerk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=18315

"... I am rebuilding my custom RMS tool based on Kyle's design....Basically, the business end of the 3" PVC coupler has an outside diameter of 100mm and and inside diameter of 89mm. 3" PVC pipe has an outside diameter of 3.5" (appx 89mm).

The key here is you need a COUPLER, not a section of pipe. The part shown in Kyles picture is a PVC coupler that reduces from 3" down to 2" (but again those are pipe size measurements).Hope the above makes sense. smashfreakB.gifThis works out perfectly for the seal which is 85mm x 105mm.It works exceedingly well. Trust me I've used it many times!I'm reworking my tool because I want to use M10 bolts to draw the seal in this time instead of tapping it in gently with a

mallot.

EDIT 12/19/12: for my install last winter I reworked the tool. The inner stop is 14mm from the outer edge of the PVC coupler (thus stopping the RMS from going in further once the stop hits the crank nose), inserting the RMS to the correct depth.

Also I reworked the tool a little bit.

The stop became a flat PVC pipe cap on the end of a piece of 2" pvc pipe that goes into the couple instead of the open piece you see. Shark's wooden solution would work great too!Added bolts to draw the RMS in instead of using a mallot. The bolts are M10x100mmx1.0. Any length that is long enough would work fine and you can just adjust the final length using some washers like I did.Same specs as above, just added the two bolts that thread into the crankshaft flywheel threads. Worked great! Here is a pic of what that looks like:"

img1788ym.jpg

IMG_4759.JPG

2013-01-05_07-25-35_842.jpg

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A simpler, if not as elegant, tool can be made from a 4” CPVC pipe coupler (this is a straight sleeve with a small ridge halfway through for the plastic pipes to rest against) found at any Lowes or Home Depot.

PVC_Coupling-Deep_Coupling_Slip_x_Slip_49.jpg

Use the original flywheel bolts that are finger tightened until they rest on the center ridge, then use a cross tightening pattern until the correct insertion depth from the flywheel flange is reached.

A around $4, it comes as a ready to use tool for the DIY’er that will probably only use it once in their lifetime instead of the $500 OEM tool……

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A simpler, if not as elegant, tool can be made from a 4” CPVC pipe coupler (this is a straight sleeve with a small ridge halfway through for the plastic pipes to rest against) found at any Lowes or Home Depot.

PVC_Coupling-Deep_Coupling_Slip_x_Slip_4

Use the original flywheel bolts that are finger tightened until they rest on the center ridge, then use a cross tightening pattern until the correct insertion depth from the flywheel flange is reached.

A around $4, it comes as a ready to use tool for the DIY’er that will probably only use it once in their lifetime instead of the $500 OEM tool……

I can't quite be sure what I'm seeing here JFP in PA. This looks more like a line art illustration than an image. Maybe I'm just not looking at it right....

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A simpler, if not as elegant, tool can be made from a 4” CPVC pipe coupler (this is a straight sleeve with a small ridge halfway through for the plastic pipes to rest against) found at any Lowes or Home Depot.

PVC_Coupling-Deep_Coupling_Slip_x_Slip_4

Use the original flywheel bolts that are finger tightened until they rest on the center ridge, then use a cross tightening pattern until the correct insertion depth from the flywheel flange is reached.

A around $4, it comes as a ready to use tool for the DIY’er that will probably only use it once in their lifetime instead of the $500 OEM tool……

I can't quite be sure what I'm seeing here JFP in PA. This looks more like a line art illustration than an image. Maybe I'm just not looking at it right....

In real life, the item depicted in the drawing above looks like this:

55963_1_201387153240.jpg

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A simpler, if not as elegant, tool can be made from a 4” CPVC pipe coupler (this is a straight sleeve with a small ridge halfway through for the plastic pipes to rest against) found at any Lowes or Home Depot.

PVC_Coupling-Deep_Coupling_Slip_x_Slip_4

Use the original flywheel bolts that are finger tightened until they rest on the center ridge, then use a cross tightening pattern until the correct insertion depth from the flywheel flange is reached.

A around $4, it comes as a ready to use tool for the DIY’er that will probably only use it once in their lifetime instead of the $500 OEM tool……

I can't quite be sure what I'm seeing here JFP in PA. This looks more like a line art illustration than an image. Maybe I'm just not looking at it right....

In real life, the item depicted in the drawing above looks like this:

55963_1_201387153240.jpg

That's what I thought it was. The isometric perspective made me wonder if the image had been changed.

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A simpler, if not as elegant, tool can be made from a 4” CPVC pipe coupler (this is a straight sleeve with a small ridge halfway through for the plastic pipes to rest against) found at any Lowes or Home Depot.

PVC_Coupling-Deep_Coupling_Slip_x_Slip_4

Use the original flywheel bolts that are finger tightened until they rest on the center ridge, then use a cross tightening pattern until the correct insertion depth from the flywheel flange is reached.

A around $4, it comes as a ready to use tool for the DIY’er that will probably only use it once in their lifetime instead of the $500 OEM tool……

I can't quite be sure what I'm seeing here JFP in PA. This looks more like a line art illustration than an image. Maybe I'm just not looking at it right....

In real life, the item depicted in the drawing above looks like this:

55963_1_201387153240.jpg

That's what I thought it was. The isometric perspective made me wonder if the image had been changed.

No, the line drawing was to highlight the ridge in the center of the coupler, not all CPVC coupler's have it and it is critical to the success of using it to insert the seal.

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Reviving the old thread, JFP - could you please repost the picture of what that coupling looks like in real, if you still have it by any chance?

 

Thanks!

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Reviving the old thread, JFP - could you please repost the picture of what that coupling looks like in real, if you still have it by any chance?

 

Thanks!

 

We no longer have the pipe coupler, but it is a common white CPVC  pipe coupler found at Lowes or Home Depot.  Just be sure it has the internal shoulder than the pipes would normally butt up against.  The shoulder is important because that is what the flywheel bolts rest on while inserting the seal.

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