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I know I've asked this before, but was unable to find it on here ? Anyhow, I want to replace my spark plugs on my 2002- 911- 996 Carrera . Any recommendations, as to manufacturer , type , part number etc ? Do I need to replace the coil packs as well ? The vehicle is a 2002 996 , but it only has 25,100 miles on it.

I am only changing the plugs due to time, as they have been there for over 10 years, and need to be changed in case they seize. However would the coil packs/ coils need to be replaced as well ?

And how about the tubes , and ' anything ' else involved in changing the plugs ? Any info , much appreciated ,thanks Dave :help:

Edited by britdave

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I will assume this is a 996.2 based on the year and part numbers are:

999-170-223-90-M14 Bosch FGR5KQE0

999-170-223-90-M220 NGK BKR6EQUP or BKR6EIX in Iridium

As for the coil packs, the short answer is yes, its advisable to replace them. You can also leave them in, but whilst you are in there, do them. Coil packs and MAFs are the modern service items every once in a while.

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Beru is the OEM brand and work very well. We have also used Denso Iridium's with excellent results as well.

As for the coil packs, unless they are acting up, or show obvious signs of future problems (cracking, etc.), I'd leave them alone. Then are not cheap, and are easy enough to replace when actually needed. Same applies to the MAF, which is probably second only to O2 sensors for being replaced for no reason.

Contrary to a lot of published information, we like to use a very small dab of anti seize on the plug threads, as well as a small amount of dielectric grease on the coil plug boots. Porsche has had problems with some types of anti seize compounds causing an increase in electrical resistance between the plug and cylinder head, but as most anti seize compounds available now are based upon a fine metal paste and excellent electrical conductors, that is no longer an issue.

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I've used the NGKs Densos, Bosch, and Berus and I they all seem to work the same. The harder metals last longer, but that's about it.

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I've used the NGKs Densos, Bosch, and Berus and I they all seem to work the same. The harder metals last longer, but that's about it.

You are correct, we like the Iridium's both because they work well, but mostly because they keep working well, which can be a major plus on something like a Turbo, where a plug change is a multi hour affair at best.

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I replaced the original plugs with BERU Z129's. They are good plugs.

I also used a small amount of anti-sieze on the threads.

Put the car on jack stands, remove the rear tires and remove the exhaust assembly.

Only takes a few minutes. Not difficult work and it will make the spark plug replacement

easy.

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I also recommend torquing the plugs to the correct specs.

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Should you replace the coils too? I've got 95K on the car now. (plan on tackling myself)

recent (93K) coolant (indy)

brake fluid flush (indy)

tiptronic (dealer)

oil filter air filter (self)

paintless dent removal (indy) ((best 180 ever spent))

coming up: h&r springs m30 bumpstops

5mm & 17mm wheel spacers

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