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Doing the plugs and coils on my 2001. I know this has been asked before, but the info I have found is inconsistent. I've popped just the plugs in so far and put some anti-seize. Should I pull them and take it off. I've read mixed reviews on this.

I also ordered new ignition coils. Do the coil tubes come pre-lubed with grease? If not, should I add some?

Thanks

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Anti-seize is not recommended. Myself, I would not worry about cleaning it off. Next change omit the anti-seize.

Not sure what you mean by coil tubes. Do you mean the spark plug tubes or the coils themselves. No lubricant is needed for the coil themselves. But the tubes are inserted with new O rings with a little lubricant on the O rings. I would not replace tubes or coils until they fail. Tubes fail when oil is present. Inspect the coils every spark plug change and look for cracks and if present replace individually as needed.

Here is an excellent link PRESS HERE

Edited by kbrandsma

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I'm sure you'll find different opinions and experiences. My understanding is if the spark plugs are nickel or zinc plated, you should not use antiseize for new install. See info from NGK http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/tb-0630111antisieze.pdf

I think our plugs, Bosch and NGK are plated so I would go with reco from spark plug manufacturers.

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Also, antiseize is not recommended by Porsche either. I think it was due to potential issues of interfering lectrical contact between the plugs and the head with the presence of antiseize.

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Thanks folks... I guess the proper term I meant was spark plug socket connector - do I need to put some dielectric grease in the connector?

So you think I should just leave the plugs alone then, or pull and wipe off the anti-seize on the plug? I don't put very many miles on the car, so I don't anticipate being in there to change them again any time soon.

Edited by dinicor

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Oh i misread your post. I thought you have not changed the plugs yet. If the engine is running fine with the new plugs, I would not worry about the little amount of antiseize you put on the plugs.

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Thanks folks... I guess the proper term I meant was spark plug socket connector - do I need to put some dielectric grease in the connector?

So you think I should just leave the plugs alone then, or pull and wipe off the anti-seize on the plug? I don't put very many miles on the car, so I don't anticipate being in there to change them again any time soon.

Use the anti seize compound. Porsche wrote that warning because some anti seize compounds are electrical insulators, which is not a good thing on plugs. Fortunatley, most anti seize compounds sold in North America are metal paste types, which are fully electrically conductive, and can be used on plugs with no problems. Also put a dab of dielectric grease on the plug ceramic to aid in seal and removal of the coil packs in the future.

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Thanks folks... I guess the proper term I meant was spark plug socket connector - do I need to put some dielectric grease in the connector?

So you think I should just leave the plugs alone then, or pull and wipe off the anti-seize on the plug? I don't put very many miles on the car, so I don't anticipate being in there to change them again any time soon.

Use the anti seize compound. Porsche wrote that warning because some anti seize compounds are electrical insulators, which is not a good thing on plugs. Fortunatley, most anti seize compounds sold in North America are metal paste types, which are fully electrically conductive, and can be used on plugs with no problems. Also put a dab of dielectric grease on the plug ceramic to aid in seal and removal of the coil packs in the future.

I agree, Al. heads and cad-ed plugs will still seize after 10k miles, if no compound is used. Why mess up a good thread! Always use a non-petroleum lube on the O-rings or any rubber like substance. I prefer the copper based anti-seize product vs the aluminum ones.

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Excellent - thanks guys! I'm good to go then! Did the muffler hack while the cans were off. Can't wait to get it all back together!

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John, any preference on copper vs nickel based anti seize then?

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John, any preference on copper vs nickel based anti seize then?

We generally use an aluminum based product, but have also used the copper based as well. I like the copper a little better, but copper prices tend to make it more expensive.

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John, any preference on copper vs nickel based anti seize then?

We generally use an aluminum based product, but have also used the copper based as well. I like the copper a little better, but copper prices tend to make it more expensive.

Thanks John.

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Timely thread. I am looking to do this myself. Had the wheels off yesterday to try and decided to wait until I have more time.

kbrandsma - thanks for the link to the 2010 thread. I definitely think that for my minimal abilities and dexterity removing the mufflers will be helpful.

The upshot is that I polished the exhaust tips and am trying to repair curb rash on one of the removed wheels :)

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Removing the mufflers makes the spark plug replacement simple.

I use anti-seize. VersaChem type 13. Permatex is as good.

It is very important that the plugs are torqued to the correct value.

Visually inspect the coil packs for cracks.

Re-inserting the tubes is easy. I tapped them back into seat by using a

Small mallet and a socket the same diameter as the tubes.

Everything is outlined in the DIY write ups for plug replacements.

The two round clamps for the mufflers have a male/female tab that has to be realigned for proper fit when

putting the mufflers back.

Good luck.

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