Jump to content

Server Lease Renewal/Software Licenses

Our yearly server lease, software licenses, as well as hardware operating costs, ARE due Dec 6th, 2021. Our current donations have fallen far short of the funds we need to renew. Please remember the RennTech.org community is Member supported so please consider a donation to help...  THANK YOU!

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

Recommended Posts

My 2005 S is very sick. For a few months it has been dripping tranny fluid out of the bellhousing and has been shifting very pourly.

This week it decided to prove to me that it still has the original plastic coolant pipes. This is my work truck and now has 173000 miles.

I plan on taking a week off of work and fixing everything myself.  I also plan on putting in a new waterpump just to be sure. I am somewhat worried about removing the transmission. Has anyone done this at home without a hoist. Does anyone have a procedure or pics.

20 years ago I was an ASE Master so I do know what I'm doing, just not on a Cayenne. Are there any special tools needed?

Where can I access the torque converter bolts. I will purcase new valve body from revmax, will I need to take to dealer to have it flashed or will my Durametric take care of it. Where is the best place to get the coolant tees, any upgrades? Looking at getting coolant pipe kit from Pelican, anything else needed there? Thank you for any help provided.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

Porsche book time on the transmission removal is 770 TU (or just under 8 hours).

 

There are special tools needed (see images below - click to enlarge)

 

attachicon.gifspecial tools 1.png

attachicon.gifspecial tools 2.png

 

I personally would not try this without access to a hoist, engine support stands, and transmission lift.

 

+1.  This cannot be described as a fun job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks everyone who responded. I have been under the truck many times and the tranny doesn't appear too difficult to remove. I am concerned on how to access the torque converter bolts. Does anyone have any pictures. At the same time I will have intake manifold off so getting to the top bellhousing bolts shouldn't be too bad. I am also going to have the starter rebuilt while there. Anyone have any ideas on other things to do while I am there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Just drove the S for the first time after completing my project. Shifts much nicer with RevMax valve body and Mobil 1 fluid. Also feeling much better with

the tubes replaced. I am very dissatified with the amount of junk plastic parts used. I broke the plastic line going from throttle body to valve cover. Porsche

wanted $157, BS!!! I made one for less than $8 from parts at the local parts store. Don't buy any of the special tools listed above, totally unneaded. The first

few miles was a little unnerving until the computer relearned itself. I also changed the waterpump to an aftermarket unit with metal blades. Had a slight fitting issue, the blades rubbed the housing a little at first. A quick buzz with the dremel tool fixed that in seconds. I am really liking my new Durametric tool, wish had bought a long

time ago. One thing I am looking for is a list of what values should be when reading with Durametric and what things can be read and what can not as some of

the things I clicked on showed no value?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

 I also changed the waterpump to an aftermarket unit with metal blades. Had a slight fitting issue, the blades rubbed the housing a little at first. A quick buzz with the dremel tool fixed that in seconds.

 

You may come to regret this decision, we have seen more than one severely damaged engine case as the result of the metal blades grinding away when the shaft bearings loosen up and start to wobble, as all water pumps do.  The factory pumps use a composite impeller for a reason.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the .pdf it looks like most if not all the special tools cab easily be substituted with something else. Also looks like the converter bolts are removed from below? I guess I've never really noticed the access for the converter bolts while changing the oil. I would also think that with the Intake manifold off the top Bell housing bolts were much easier to access?  Did you lower the engine/tranny at all or tilt it to get the transmission out? Congrats on the work. Do some searching on here and Rennlist for help with the Durametric as their online manual leaves a bit to be desired. There is a way to reset the Transmisson computer (TCU) so it goes through a complete relearning cycle. And yes the plastic hoses are junk, especially after a few years they get real brittle. I just did my Coolant T's this winter and either replaced most of the lines or used a razor blade to cut the plastic off the Plastic barbed fittings and replaced the hose portions with Silicone hoses. Congrats again on the job completed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 I also changed the waterpump to an aftermarket unit with metal blades. Had a slight fitting issue, the blades rubbed the housing a little at first. A quick buzz with the dremel tool fixed that in seconds.

 

You may come to regret this decision, we have seen more than one severely damaged engine case as the result of the metal blades grinding away when the shaft bearings loosen up and start to wobble, as all water pumps do.  The factory pumps use a composite impeller for a reason.

 

I've seen this on 928s over the years.  Definitely would recommend a composite impellers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

JFP ..... Your note on water pumps.

Sounds logic for me but when I was searching for this part in the last weeks i just found versions with Metal impellers.

 

Even Porsche tried metal impellers, and then went back to composite.  Problem is that all water pump shafts will wear and will start to wobble over time.  If the metal impeller is very close to the case (as it should be), it will tear it up pretty badly.  And beside the damage to the engine case, there is now a much larger space between the impeller and the case, reducing the efficiency of the pump even if the case is not destroyed.  Bad idea all around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although in the case of VAG, they went with composite impellers years back and they all would disintegrate before the timing belts were due and the cars would overheat if not caught on the gauge. Everyone replaced theirs with metal impellers, even VAG.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

Although in the case of VAG, they went with composite impellers years back and they all would disintegrate before the timing belts were due and the cars would overheat if not caught on the gauge. Everyone replaced theirs with metal impellers, even VAG.

 

Porsche had the same composite impeller issues, and still do.  But when they tried metal impellers, the results were worse, so they went back to composites and stayed there.  Water pumps are now considered a consumable and should be replaced on mileage or age rather than waiting until they fail.  This also applies to their cars as well as the SUV's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.