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Hello,

 
I know this topic has lots of coverage on this forum and on others however I can't see to find an definitive answer to jacking up the rear of a 996. (I need to clear the rear drainage holes).
 
So i've seen some of those nice Jackpoint Jackstands which look great and seem to do the job with major ease however I want to see if using a standard low profile trolley jack and axle stands can do the job 'just as quick' (I know it won't be the same).
 
What I’ve found:
 
1 - I’ve tried lifting the front then trying the get the axle stands at the rear in. The issue, didn't have enough clearance - also felt the car was really tilting too much.
 
2 - I’ve also read about lifting from the rear at a point in front of the oil drain. The issue, I’m really wary of using this point being around such a critical area. (attached)
 
3 - Theres also the rear suspension mounting point. The issue I don't have a long low profile trolley jack. (attached)
 
 
Can someone suggest a definitive answer or should i just go ahead and buy those Jackpoint stands.
 
Cheers

post-99431-0-33247900-1443982560_thumb.j

post-99431-0-44154200-1443982561_thumb.j

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Hello,

 
I know this topic has lots of coverage on this forum and on others however I can't see to find an definitive answer to jacking up the rear of a 996. (I need to clear the rear drainage holes).
 
So i've seen some of those nice Jackpoint Jackstands which look great and seem to do the job with major ease however I want to see if using a standard low profile trolley jack and axle stands can do the job 'just as quick' (I know it won't be the same).
 
What I’ve found:
 
1 - I’ve tried lifting the front then trying the get the axle stands at the rear in. The issue, didn't have enough clearance - also felt the car was really tilting too much.
 
2 - I’ve also read about lifting from the rear at a point in front of the oil drain. The issue, I’m really wary of using this point being around such a critical area. (attached)
 
3 - Theres also the rear suspension mounting point. The issue I don't have a long low profile trolley jack. (attached)
 
 
Can someone suggest a definitive answer or should i just go ahead and buy those Jackpoint stands.
 
Cheers

 

 

The car has defined lift points, which are outline in the owner's manual, and do not involve lifting the entire end of the car in one move.  You also do not need customized jack stands for the car, generic stands with a simple hockey puck on top will do just fine. And yes, the car will tilt a bit while jacking it from the side, which is completely normal.

 

4.jpg 6.jpg

 

As this had been a repeating question, search is always your best friend.

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I normally use two trolley jacks on the jacking points on opposite sides at the back.  I jack up the car evenly so that it does not tilt and fall off the jack and so that it only lifts at the back, keeping the front wheels on the ground.  When it's high enough I place even height axle stands under the suspension pivots and lower the car onto these.  I keep the jacks in place, under very light pressure.

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Hi,

 

Thanks for your replies. So i'm aware of those manual define jack points and that I prefer to use. However If i want to place stands at rear I need to lift from the front defined point to get the back in right. Its just when i lift seems like a huge tilt.

 

If i were to use a second trolley jack I'd definitely feel more comfortable with less tilt however would I get the rear up enough to get my stands in?

 

Regards.

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There are four defined jacking points.  If you lift only one at the back eventually the front will also lift on the same side.  If you lift both sides evenly at the back the front wheels will remain on the ground.

 

If you want to get under the back safely you need to lift it off the ground by jacking evenly at both sides at the back jacking points.  Get the car on a reasonably level surface.  Put trolley jacks, one each side at he back, and jack each side about 75mm at a time.  The front wheels will stay on the ground and only the back will lift. When it's up to full height place the stands underneath and lower the car onto the stands.  Chock both front wheels.  Keep some slight pressure on both jacks as a safety measure.  When you have everything in place make sure the car is firm and rigid before you go underneath.  Also remember that if you are using a wrench under a car that is off its wheels it is possible to shift it sideways and in extreme cases pull it off the stands.  This can be dangerous.

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There are four defined jacking points.  If you lift only one at the back eventually the front will also lift on the same side.  If you lift both sides evenly at the back the front wheels will remain on the ground.

 

If you want to get under the back safely you need to lift it off the ground by jacking evenly at both sides at the back jacking points.  Get the car on a reasonably level surface.  Put trolley jacks, one each side at he back, and jack each side about 75mm at a time.  The front wheels will stay on the ground and only the back will lift. When it's up to full height place the stands underneath and lower the car onto the stands.  Chock both front wheels.  Keep some slight pressure on both jacks as a safety measure.  When you have everything in place make sure the car is firm and rigid before you go underneath.  Also remember that if you are using a wrench under a car that is off its wheels it is possible to shift it sideways and in extreme cases pull it off the stands.  This can be dangerous.

post-86549-0-16327000-1443995261_thumb.j

post-86549-0-38044400-1443995303_thumb.j

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I finally bit the bullet and bought a MaxJax 2 post lift that fits under my 8' garage ceiling.  I sit on a BoneTail rolling chair and scoot around under the car.  The MaxJax lift is good for 6,000 lbs so I feel safe and I don't have to worry about getting a jack under the car and having to rely on jack stands.

 

I appreciate the cost of the lift is signficant, but your life is too.  I bought my MaxJax lift from Costco on sale, $1,900, free delivery.  You might ralionalize the cost by saving a couple hundred dollars an oil change at the dealer, plus have a lot more fun working on your car.

 

post-85466-0-14423800-1444011531_thumb.j

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attachicon.gifmaxjax_med.pdfI finally bit the bullet and bought a MaxJax 2 post lift that fits under my 8' garage ceiling.  I sit on a BoneTail rolling chair and scoot around under the car.  The MaxJax lift is good for 6,000 lbs so I feel safe and I don't have to worry about getting a jack under the car and having to rely on jack stands.

 

I appreciate the cost of the lift is signficant, but your life is too.  I bought my MaxJax lift from Costco on sale, $1,900, free delivery.  You might ralionalize the cost by saving a couple hundred dollars an oil change at the dealer, plus have a lot more fun working on your car.

 

attachicon.gifmaxjax_med.jpg

I have thought about getting one of these as I have enough headroom in my car port.  What about floor fixing.  Is it  permanently bolted down? 

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The MaxJax has 5 large bolts that screw into permanent anchors in the floor.  As long as you have a 4" slab you're good to go.  The feature is that you can remove the bolts and wheel the post out of the way when not in use.  The post has wheels so it can be moved around without much effort. However I've never moved mine.  I just park a little to the rear of the garage so the doors can swing full open without hitting the post.  The install is pretty easy, you'll need a rotorhammer for drilling holes in the concrete.

 

I've had my car up and down so many times I couldn't even count.  It's great for cleaning wheels, oil changes, removing the belly pans, etc.  I'll take more pixs and post.  Also the MaxJax dealer was really helpful, I had the need to replace some parts and they sent it out without any questions.  Nice people...

 

If anyone ends up installing this lift I can give you some good advise on the install, I came up with some short cuts on the install. If you enjoy working on your car $2,000 for a $30,000 plus car isn't a deal breaker.  I wouldn't leave home without it...

 

I'm not a paid employee, but just a happy customer... :-)

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Thank you that's useful. My car port has a blocked floor so I would have to dig these out and put in a slab. However, it might be worth doing this as I am finding low level maintenance a bit painful these days.

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There are four defined jacking points.  If you lift only one at the back eventually the front will also lift on the same side.  If you lift both sides evenly at the back the front wheels will remain on the ground.

 

If you want to get under the back safely you need to lift it off the ground by jacking evenly at both sides at the back jacking points.  Get the car on a reasonably level surface.  Put trolley jacks, one each side at he back, and jack each side about 75mm at a time.  The front wheels will stay on the ground and only the back will lift. When it's up to full height place the stands underneath and lower the car onto the stands.  Chock both front wheels.  Keep some slight pressure on both jacks as a safety measure.  When you have everything in place make sure the car is firm and rigid before you go underneath.  Also remember that if you are using a wrench under a car that is off its wheels it is possible to shift it sideways and in extreme cases pull it off the stands.  This can be dangerous.

 

Ah ok - great, this makes sense. 

 

And where exactly do you place the axle stands then?

Also if I want to lift the front i presume they'd go in a similar place?

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Hello,

 
I know this topic has lots of coverage on this forum and on others however I can't see to find an definitive answer to jacking up the rear of a 996. (I need to clear the rear drainage holes).
 
So i've seen some of those nice Jackpoint Jackstands which look great and seem to do the job with major ease however I want to see if using a standard low profile trolley jack and axle stands can do the job 'just as quick' (I know it won't be the same).
 
What I’ve found:
 
1 - I’ve tried lifting the front then trying the get the axle stands at the rear in. The issue, didn't have enough clearance - also felt the car was really tilting too much.
 
2 - I’ve also read about lifting from the rear at a point in front of the oil drain. The issue, I’m really wary of using this point being around such a critical area. (attached)
 
3 - Theres also the rear suspension mounting point. The issue I don't have a long low profile trolley jack. (attached)
 
 
Can someone suggest a definitive answer or should i just go ahead and buy those Jackpoint stands.
 
Cheers

 

 

The car has defined lift points, which are outline in the owner's manual, and do not involve lifting the entire end of the car in one move.  You also do not need customized jack stands for the car, generic stands with a simple hockey puck on top will do just fine. And yes, the car will tilt a bit while jacking it from the side, which is completely normal.

 

4.jpg 6.jpg

 

As this had been a repeating question, search is always your best friend.

 

 

Hi,

 

I'm aware of those lift points however how do i lift and get my axle stands in the same place (without using a jackpoint jack stand)?

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You can jack up at the defined body points, put the axle stands under the suspension mounting points and lower the car onto the stands. 

 

You could jack up under the suspension points and lower the car onto the defined body points.  Either way would do what you want.   

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You can jack up at the defined body points, put the axle stands under the suspension mounting points and lower the car onto the stands. 

 

You could jack up under the suspension points and lower the car onto the defined body points.  Either way would do what you want.   

 

The later is what I have done.  Worked fine and was nice and solid, although I'd still prefer to lift the back with one lift and place jack stands under the body points.

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  • 1 month later...

Whats the recommendation to lift the rear with aerokit ii side skirts? I have heard that some jack pads can damage them? Are there any jack pads that can sit on a trolley jack and use the factory jacking points? 

 

Thanks!

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Creekman, I like the color of your car.   ;-)

 

How does one know how thick a slab they have?  My sons and I have been thinking about the MaxJax; they both live out of the home, but one has a Cayman and the other is looking for a decent Porsche now as well. Of course, they want it installed in my garage, of course!

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Creekman, I like the color of your car.   ;-)

 

How does one know how thick a slab they have?  My sons and I have been thinking about the MaxJax; they both live out of the home, but one has a Cayman and the other is looking for a decent Porsche now as well. Of course, they want it installed in my garage, of course!

Drill a hole through it with a long bit. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I jack mine up under the crossmember that is forward of the oil pan, put jack stands under the rear jacking points, then lower and remove the jack.  My jack isn't low enough to fit so I have to drive the rear wheels onto 2 x 4s so there is enough  clearance.  The key for me is to remember to put 2 x 4s back under the wheels before I lower the car or I can't get the jack out. Ask me how I know :)

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Notice the orientation of the front and rear lift points, the fronts are 90 degrees from the rears.  This is a safety feature, which requires jack stands to also be place 90 degrees to each other.  This minimizes the chance that the car will slide off of the jack stands, but only if they do not have a item like a hockey puck in between.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I build 2 ramps in 2x10 white pine. There are 5 steps first 78 inches long and the next 15 inches shorter the 3rd another 15 inches shorter and so on. I used long 3 inch deck screws to hold the ramp together but it's very solid. 5 steps up your car is always safe to get under and easy to change oil ect.I will try to post a couple of pictures in the next day or two.

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I build 2 ramps in 2x10 white pine. There are 5 steps first 78 inches long and the next 15 inches shorter the 3rd another 15 inches shorter and so on. I used long 3 inch deck screws to hold the ramp together but it's very solid. 5 steps up your car is always safe to get under and easy to change oil ect.I will try to post a couple of pictures in the next day or two.

Ramps for levelling up Motorhomes (RV's in US) are also useful for this if you don't want to take the wheels off. They come pre-formed with steps and chocks. 

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    • By Viper6
      OK, I can't be the only DIY guy to make this mistake (fingers crossed)... I had just completed bleeding the brakes and clutch up on jack stands (in last minute prep for my DE the next day) and was jacking up the rear to remove the rear jack stand and the car is so stiff it came off the front and rear jack stands simultaneously (normal).  I then removed the rear stand and began to lower it back down and the front passenger side jack slipped off the lift point and crushed the outer AC hard line almost completely. I instantly thought it was the cooling lines and I layed on the ground in defeat for about 10 minutes knowing I had just threw away my weekend.  As I lay there staring at the ceiling on the concrete floor, I then realized it was not my cooling line (too small diameter for cooling), it was my AC line and I was back in business!  
       
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      My question is this... Option A - if it runs OK and is not cracked, can I just let it go and no further harm will come (besides my pride)?  Or Option B - I am compromising the life of more expensive parts of the system ($1300 compressor due to reduced oil flow, etc) if I don't get it fixed asap?  If the concensus/ recommendation is to fix it, what parts besides the hard line (and two new seals) do I need replace (e.g. Dryer/Desicant module, etc.)?
       
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