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Fluid replacement - coolant, Pentosin, brakes...


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My TT just turned 10 recently. To the best of my knowledge, the only fluids that were ever replaced were oil and - once I think - brake fluid.

 

Following the general guidelines for automotive fluids, I think it may be well past time to tackle the job.

 

How, though?

 

Brakes - is there a specific procedure for the ABS pump? Also - what fluid to put in? I would have said ATE super blue but that went the way of the dodo. The Typ 200? Motul RBF600, which is about equivalent? I will NOT put Castrol racing in a car that never sees the track...

 

Update - found brake details here, Typ 200 it is

 

http://www.renntech.org/forums/topic/39269-brake-fluid-for-a-2002-996911-which-type/

 

Does the Durametric cable activate the ABS pump? How should that be done?

 

Coolant - given the relative position of the radiators and the engine this must be a wonderful delight. Recommendations? Does Porsche have its own coolant or should I just (gulp!) use BMW coolant?

 

Coolant info here:

 

http://www.renntech.org/forums/topic/36393-996-coolant-does-it-have-to-be-genuine-porsche/

 

http://www.renntech.org/forums/topic/3772-oem-porsche-antifreezecoolant/

 

Shop manual as usual isn't tremendously helpful: drain coolant from the drain cocks in the front and at the engine - OK - then connect the PST2 for bleeding. I ... happen not to have a PST2.

 

Pentosin circuit - yes, Pentosin does degrade, I found out, and not particularly gracefully, either. Is there an accepted procedure?

 

...I just found out there are TWO tanks for Pentosin? What were they...?

 

Gearbox - no clue here - read the manual, it seems straightforward but it doesn't have oils listed.

 

Differentials - even less - same as above - the filler for the rear diff seems particularly delightful and - what about the center diff?

 

...help? I did search on the forum but I didn't find an awful lot.

Edited by nmlss
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ATE type 200 is fine for the brakes.  While the Durametric system can activate the ABS/PSM control system during a flush, doing so is only necessary if air has gotten into the control network.

 

As for coolant, we only use Porsche's stuff, which is very good, but has been known to "not play well with others", so be careful about using other products unless the system has been fully drained and flushed with water first.  Only mix the Porsche antifreeze with distilled water, never tap water.  The optimal way to refill the cooling system is using a vacuum tool, which makes the process a 5 min. project instead of an all day affair.

 

The second Pentosin tank (in the luggage compartment, under a cover) is for the clutch system.  Flushing the power steering system is a pretty elaborate affair, requiring disconnecting the hydraulic system from the rack and running fresh fluid through the entire system until it is clear.  Most owner's prefer to DIY this by siphoning out as much of the old fluid from the tanks and replenishing it at least once every year rather than disconnecting the lines from the rack and pumping fluid through the system.

 

Porsche has typically listed their "approved" lubricants in Technical Service Bulletins, which are periodically updated, but you can usually find a wealth of information is the DIY sections under maintenance: http://www.renntech.org/forums/tutorials/article/342-996tt-manual-transmission-and-front-wheel-drive-oil-replacement/.

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ATE type 200 is fine for the brakes.  While the Durametric system can activate the ABS/PSM control system during a flush, doing so is only necessary if air has gotten into the control network.

 

As for coolant, we only use Porsche's stuff, which is very good, but has been known to "not play well with others", so be careful about using other products unless the system has been fully drained and flushed with water first.  Only mix the Porsche antifreeze with distilled water, never tap water.  The optimal way to refill the cooling system is using a vacuum tool, which makes the process a 5 min. project instead of an all day affair.

 

The second Pentosin tank (in the luggage compartment, under a cover) is for the clutch system.  Flushing the power steering system is a pretty elaborate affair, requiring disconnecting the hydraulic system from the rack and running fresh fluid through the entire system until it is clear.  Most owner's prefer to DIY this by siphoning out as much of the old fluid from the tanks and replenishing it at least once every year rather than disconnecting the lines from the rack and pumping fluid through the system.

 

Porsche has typically listed their "approved" lubricants in Technical Service Bulletins, which are periodically updated, but you can usually find a wealth of information is the DIY sections under maintenance: http://www.renntech.org/forums/tutorials/article/342-996tt-manual-transmission-and-front-wheel-drive-oil-replacement/.

You say mixing Porsche's stuff with others can be a problem. What problems does this cause?

Further on the coolant issue, how often would you say coolant should be replaced in a 996tt?

Finally, is it really necessary to replace steering fluid, - annually?

thanks for your help

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ATE type 200 is fine for the brakes.  While the Durametric system can activate the ABS/PSM control system during a flush, doing so is only necessary if air has gotten into the control network.

 

As for coolant, we only use Porsche's stuff, which is very good, but has been known to "not play well with others", so be careful about using other products unless the system has been fully drained and flushed with water first.  Only mix the Porsche antifreeze with distilled water, never tap water.  The optimal way to refill the cooling system is using a vacuum tool, which makes the process a 5 min. project instead of an all day affair.

 

The second Pentosin tank (in the luggage compartment, under a cover) is for the clutch system.  Flushing the power steering system is a pretty elaborate affair, requiring disconnecting the hydraulic system from the rack and running fresh fluid through the entire system until it is clear.  Most owner's prefer to DIY this by siphoning out as much of the old fluid from the tanks and replenishing it at least once every year rather than disconnecting the lines from the rack and pumping fluid through the system.

 

Porsche has typically listed their "approved" lubricants in Technical Service Bulletins, which are periodically updated, but you can usually find a wealth of information is the DIY sections under maintenance: http://www.renntech.org/forums/tutorials/article/342-996tt-manual-transmission-and-front-wheel-drive-oil-replacement/.

You say mixing Porsche's stuff with others can be a problem. What problems does this cause?

Further on the coolant issue, how often would you say coolant should be replaced in a 996tt?

Finally, is it really necessary to replace steering fluid, - annually?

thanks for your help

 

 

Gelation is the big issue, the formation of globs of sticky goo inside the cooling system that are a major pain to get out.

 

Normally, we would use a schedule of every 5-6 years for the coolant, or sooner if it fails testing.

 

No, but if you are doing it by only replacing what is held in the system reservoir by siphoning it out (rather than pulling the lower body panels and disconnecting the steering rack lines for a complete system flush), because that is only a partial replacement, doing it annually makes better sense.

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Thanks JFP. I'm actually halfway tempted to hand you the car and let you do the job (if I am not mistaken about your profession)... I am not entirely clear on how one would bleed the cooling circuit but the topology does make me think it's going to be very, very amusing.

 

For 'how much is a new 991 again' values of amusing.

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The biggest problem people run into with doing DIY service is not knowing what they are getting into before they start, and then trying to figure out how to get out of the predicament that they now find themselves in.  Like all vehicles, these have their idiocracies, and there are a lot of tools that can make the project a simple afternoon of saving money and personal satisfaction.  Vacuum filling systems, like the Uview system Porsche uses to refill these cars can be used on anything that is liquid cooled:

 

UVU550000.jpg

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It doesn't seem awfully expensive.

 

And the BMW V8s in the house would probably benefit as well.

 

Hm.

 

There's a howto with that device, written for the Boxster, IIRC... I think it's in the original post somewhere.

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