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A lot has been written regarding the pro’s and con’s of replacing the stock air filters on Cayenne S and Turbo.

From most peoples experience including my own, there is a marked improvement in the low-end pick up which “almost” eliminates the low speed transmission lag.

The project is clearly diy and should take no longer than 45 minutes.

Start my removing the engine bay covers. These are held on with ¼ turn fasteners. Make sure you are careful, if they pop out they will fly to that place where lost nuts and bolts end up.

Once done you can begin to take the flex air pipes off the center fixed pipe. Release the ring clamps and slide to the middle, pull off each hose.

Release the O2 sensor plugs at each side, use a flat blade screw driver, insert into slot and pull to release (tricky).

Also on the left air box at the rear midway down there is a hose attached, you may not be able to see it at first but you can feel it. It’s tough to get off but it does come off in the end.

There are 2 spring clips at the top of each box, release them and then pull the box away at the top and then up.

The stock air filters can now be pull out of their seat.

I chose BMC racing filters to replace the stock ones. These are Porsche authorized.

Make sure you bed them in all the way around, the slimy rubber surround makes this easy.

Replace the boxes by locating the to plugs at the bottom of the box with the 2 notches on the base. Redo the spring clips and put it back together.

No real issues at all.

There are some pictures here of the process

My Gallery

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Thank you for your very informative postings. Would you be so kind as to answer a few basic questions?

1. How has your engine been performing since you installed the bmc air filters? Any issues with the mass air flow sensor?

2. Where did you get the info that these filters are approved by Porsche?

3. Any other comments you have.

Thank you.

Respectfully,

Tom Utsch

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Hi Tommy

Thanks for the kind words

To answer, I have had zero issues with the O2 sensors, in fact it sailed through PA emissions a few weeks ago, so neither the filters or the secondary cat bypass pipes reduced the effectiveness of the emission control.

2 - There is a quote on the BMC site, which I verified with my dealer, they use them on some of the sport cars. Dealer had no issue with my fitting them.

I still have the same feeling that it revs free'er than it does with the stock filters, others post tech info to the contrary and I don't know enough other than to say I think they do make a difference.

I will be doing their first cleaning in a few weeks.

Good Luck :cheers:

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Mudman,

Thank you for sharing your experiences.

Have you considered the chip replacement and exhaust catalytic converter bypass modifications? Pro's or con's that you know of?

Thank you.

Tommy :drive:

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Just to add to the thread, the DIY is cake.. took like twenty minutes.. I bought the K&N version http://www.knfilters.com/search/product.aspx?Prod=33-2857 x 2 needed of course for my 04 CTT.. I was amazed at the thickness difference. The K&N's are half or less what the stock paper ones are... They look much better too.. like you'll ever see them.. anyway the install is cake except for the passenger side has that plug/hos in the airbox... it pushes off, but took some good force to make it happen... pushing it back on on was cake.. the long pins the hold the airbox on can be a pain too.. you match them to the dimples facing back to line them up in the groove and take pliars to pull them out..

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A lot has been written regarding the pro’s and con’s of replacing the stock air filters on Cayenne S and Turbo.

From most peoples experience including my own, there is a marked improvement in the low-end pick up which “almost” eliminates the low speed transmission lag.

The project is clearly diy and should take no longer than 45 minutes.

Start my removing the engine bay covers. These are held on with ¼ turn fasteners. Make sure you are careful, if they pop out they will fly to that place where lost nuts and bolts end up.

Once done you can begin to take the flex air pipes off the center fixed pipe. Release the ring clamps and slide to the middle, pull off each hose.

Release the O2 sensor plugs at each side, use a flat blade screw driver, insert into slot and pull to release (tricky).

Also on the left air box at the rear midway down there is a hose attached, you may not be able to see it at first but you can feel it. It’s tough to get off but it does come off in the end.

There are 2 spring clips at the top of each box, release them and then pull the box away at the top and then up.

The stock air filters can now be pull out of their seat.

I chose BMC racing filters to replace the stock ones. These are Porsche authorized.

Make sure you bed them in all the way around, the slimy rubber surround makes this easy.

Replace the boxes by locating the to plugs at the bottom of the box with the 2 notches on the base. Redo the spring clips and put it back together.

No real issues at all.

There are some pictures here of the process

My Gallery

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This workled well on my 2005 Cayenne S using K&N filters

Low end take off has improved noticeably with the 'dead' spot when taking off as the transmission sorts itself out (all porsches start in 2nd gear)

The K&N filter is half the thickness of the stock filter so I did not need to pull the hose of the left hand filter.

I was missing several of the snap locks that clip on the engine bay covers - I rang the Porsche dealer and they said they 'pop off' and can often be found on the top of the cover under the car - a bit of sliding around under the car and feeling for them found none - note that the engine was not HOT - I would not recommend this if the engine is hot.

Running up the engine after the filter replacement gave significant induction roar (i did not try this before I change the filters) which suggest stronger and better breathing.

I would recommend taking great care in seating the air boxes around the filters, but this seems idiot proof, also check the fit of the tubes connecting the air boxes to the engine particularly behind the tube where you cannot see

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I wanted to add to this great thread. I changed my air filters yesterday on my 05 CTT. It is a little different that the S since the air pipes actually go down instead of across. So there are 2 pins that need to be rotated to the 12 o'clock position to remove the air box. After 2 hours of trying to get to the clamps, I decided to search the forums since I never saw these pins before and it looked logical that the air box must come apart by those pins.

Anyway, look at the V6 instructions to learn how to remove those pins. It is the only way to change the filters on a CTT.

Additional Instructions that Pertain to the CTT

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Snake oil :D

Agree. After running the K&N filters for a year, with regular cleaning, I recently had my oil analyzed by Blackstone Labs and they came back with elevated silica (ie. sand!). Needless to say I am running stock filters again.

JP

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The on board computer and management system will always adjust the mixture, I fail to see how fitting mickey mouse air filters will change anything.

Given the amount of money Porsche must spend on honing these machines to eke out every possible bhp, surely they would simply chuck a pair of wonder filters on instead, and keep the savings.....LOL

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The on board computer and management system will always adjust the mixture, I fail to see how fitting mickey mouse air filters will change anything.

Given the amount of money Porsche must spend on honing these machines to eke out every possible bhp, surely they would simply chuck a pair of wonder filters on instead, and keep the savings.....LOL

Maybe yes, maybe no. Perhaps K&N wasn't willing to give away enough margin on their product for Porsche to consider an air filter [endorsement] worth their while. I don't really believe that Mobil 1 is the best engine lubricant on the planet. Just my humble opinion. Mudman - nice write up BTW, thanks.

Edited by egr58

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Filters like K&N will give better performance as they allow greater airflow. Downside is, they also allow greater contaminant ingress. Thus more performance but also more wear.

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I mentioned the filter when I first bought my WRX new in 3/2004 - it was not factory installed then. My dealer was kind enough to install one for free and I have replaced them yearly since then.Changing you cabin air filter can make a big diffence in the indoor air quality of your vehicle.

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So i have to eat some crow on this one; I tired the BMC filters and there was a nice change in throttle response, but fowled both MAF's and had to eat the cost. Went back to stock and I miss the change.

I will say though that I have read a lot of comments on "they let more dirt into the engine", and after doing some research found that all filters must adhere to a worldwide ISO standard for particulate filtering. So out of the box they must ba at a minimum as good as the factory ones. Now, when they get re-oiled I can't say they would be the same.....

My two cents CDN :D

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