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28 minutes ago, syswizard said:

To remove the calipers for painting, is a special tool required ?

 

 

You are going to need a set of metric flare nut wrenches to undo the flex lines:

61ugQJsLhpL._SL1000_.jpg

You will need to buy or fabricate line plugs for each brake line to prevent the system gravity draining while the calipers are off.  You will also need new caliper bolts as they are single use, high temp anti seize compound for the same, and a suitable torque wrench to reinstall the calipers.

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Thanks, but I've been told NOT to undo the brake lines, but only release the caliper bolts.

In other words, paint the calipers with the brake line attached.

Is this wrong ?

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22 minutes ago, syswizard said:

Thanks, but I've been told NOT to undo the brake lines, but only release the caliper bolts.

In other words, paint the calipers with the brake line attached.

Is this wrong ?

 

Well, as your original post stated “to remove the calipers for painting”, I assumed you were doing exactly that.

 

If you loosen the caliper bolts, you will still need new ones as they are single use only, and you will still need a torque wrench to properly tighten the new ones.

 

Personally, I would completely remove the calipers to properly clean, prep, and paint them to prevent any chance of future paint peeling; but that is just the way we roll in my shop.

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If this were a Honda Civic, sure, paint them while still on the car...

 

For a Porsche?  Do it right please. Take it apart properly, disassemble the calipers down to their bare components, powder coat instead of paint, and reassemble with new seals. Install with new bolts. This, of course, means that you will need to bleed the brake system after reassembly. If you're not going to do it right, please don't do it at all.

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Optimus - 

IMHO that's a bit of "over kill"....and reminds me of all of the "over engineering" I've experienced with this car.

Catalyzed urethane paint is a very tough coating only to fail if the rotors get red hot...as in a racing mode.

 

A rare triple square female socket is required to remove the calipers from my 2014 boxster....10 mm I believe.

Very hard to find this item.

The big trick with refinishing the calipers is getting the "PORSCHE" lettering back on.

Special stencils have been created for this purpose.

 

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54 minutes ago, syswizard said:

Optimus - 

IMHO that's a bit of "over kill"....and reminds me of all of the "over engineering" I've experienced with this car.

Catalyzed urethane paint is a very tough coating only to fail if the rotors get red hot...as in a racing mode.

 

A rare triple square female socket is required to remove the calipers from my 2014 boxster....10 mm I believe.

Very hard to find this item.

The big trick with refinishing the calipers is getting the "PORSCHE" lettering back on.

Special stencils have been created for this purpose.

 

 

Powder coating is much more durable than any form of paint.

 

Snap On carries the socket you are looking for.....

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Yeah JFP....I think there is some confusion between Torqx and Triple Square....I think they are the same.

I need an E10 torqx female socket....that's all.

 

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1 hour ago, syswizard said:

Yeah JFP....I think there is some confusion between Torqx and Triple Square....I think they are the same.

I need an E10 torqx female socket....that's all.

 

 

No, they are not:

 

Main article: Torx

Torx[edit]

Screw Head - Torx.svg
170px-Torx.jpg
 
Torx driver

The hexalobular socket screw drive, often referred to by the original proprietary brand name Torx ( /ˈtɔːrks/) or by the alternative generic name star drive, uses a star-shaped recess in the fastener with six rounded points. It was designed to permit increased torque transfer from the driver to the bit compared to other drive systems. The drive was developed in 1967[45] by Camcar Textron.[46] Torx is very popular in the automotive and electronics industries because of resistance to cam out, and extended bit life, as well as reduced operator fatigue by minimizing the need to bear down on the drive tool to prevent cam out. A tamper-resistant Security Torx head has a small pin inside the recess. Owing to its six-fold symmetry, a Torx driver can also be used as an improvised substitute for a hex driver, although careful sizing is critical to prevent stripping the socket.

 

Triple-square[edit]

Screw Head - Triple Square.svg

The triple-square, also known as XZN, is a type of screw drive with 12 equally spaced protrusions, each ending in a 90° internal angle. Common sizes are 6, 8, 10, and 12 mm. The name derives from overlaying three equal squares to form such a pattern with 12 right-angled protrusions (a 12-pointed star). In other words, three Robertson squares are superimposed at a successive 30° rotation. The design is similar to that of the double-square—in both cases, the idea being that it resembles a square (Robertson) but can be engaged at more frequent angles by the driver bit. These screws can be driven with standard Robertson bits.

The 12-pointed internal star shape superficially resembles the "double hex" fastener head, but differs subtly in that the points are shaped to an internal angle of 90° (derived from a square), rather than the 120° internal angle of a hexagon. In practice, drivers for the fasteners may or may not interchange, but should be examined carefully for proper fit before application of force. A hex key should not be used where a key of square cross-section is the correct fit.

Triple-square drive fasteners have been used in high-torque applications, such as cylinder head bolts and drive train components. The fasteners involved have heads that are hardened and tempered to withstand the driving torque without destroying the star points. They are commonly found on German vehicles such as Audi, BMW, Opel, Mercedes, Porsche and Volkswagen.[43]

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G2 Caliper Paint.    If you take your time, you can do it right without taking them apart.  Follow instructions.  Clean with the brake cleaner included with kit and a good brass brush.   I used steel wool as well.   First coat was thin and then two more heavier coats.  It will smooth out as it dries.   Came out awesome. 

 

  Go to maxspeed-motorsports.com for the Porsche decals or stencils. 

Edited by TCokerjr68

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Thanks for that Coker. So is the G2 Paint more heat resistant than catalyzed urethane paint (standard car finish) ?

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On ‎11‎/‎2‎/‎2018 at 11:12 AM, syswizard said:

Thanks for that Coker. So is the G2 Paint more heat resistant than catalyzed urethane paint (standard car finish) ?

I have used it on two different cars with no issues.  It goes on like glue.   Its will smooth out as it dries so don't be alarmed.   Just clean the calipers real well and your first coat really thin.  So thin you will be able to see through it.   

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The G2 Paint System got excellent 4 star plus reviews on Amazon.

Amazingly it does not require a primer.

 

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