Jump to content

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone, thanks for letting me join you forum.

This is a old question, but Please help, on a 3 chain engine Do i need to remove the chain tensioner under the air con unit to change my  IMS bearing

2.7, boxster, 2003

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
    You can remove these ads by becoming a Contributing Member.

5 hours ago, johnp said:

Hi everyone, thanks for letting me join you forum.

This is a old question, but Please help, on a 3 chain engine Do i need to remove the chain tensioner under the air con unit to change my  IMS bearing

2.7, boxster, 2003

 

 

Welcome to RennTech :welcomeani:

 

No, as long as you follow the rest of LN Engineerings instructions to the letter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, JFP in PA said:

 

Welcome to RennTech :welcomeani:

 

No, as long as you follow the rest of LN Engineerings instructions to the letter.

Hi, thanks for the reply, i am going to fit the LN Engineering ultimate IMS retrofit kit.  I have the two sets of tools to do the work from them and i  intend to order the kit tomorrow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Phavas said:

I sourced the same same bearing from the UK for $25.00

 

Good luck with that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎3‎/‎24‎/‎2019 at 3:31 AM, Phavas said:

I sourced the same same bearing from the UK for $25.00

 

?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HI I think you are talking about a different bearing, this is not a bearing, its a solid outer and inner shaft

it works like a crankshaft bearing

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since the LN bearings are made uniquely for them with unique races and other parts of the kit also unique ... and since the instructions have gone through many revisions to improve them and since the LN tools are designed to make the process successful ....

 

Not ever saying that other approaches can't be successful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reply, can you please explain your last email, my question at the start of the topic was, do i or do not remove the front engine chain presser bolt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, johnp said:

Thanks for the reply, can you please explain your last email, my question at the start of the topic was, do i or do not remove the front engine chain presser bolt

 

LN wrote up the 3 and 5 chain instructions, available online, which should be followed.  My personal preference on three chains is to pull all the tensioners.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What happened to you first email, you said no, i did not wont to to removing the air con unit, help

But thanks for the reply

At the moment im having a problem removing the water pips around the auto box ie where to start

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, johnp said:

What happened to you first email, you said no, i did not wont to to removing the air con unit, help

But thanks for the reply

At the moment im having a problem removing the water pips around the auto box ie where to start

 

Again, I said: "No, as long as you follow the rest of LN Engineering's instructions to the letter. "; and stated that "my personal preference was to remove them all".

Your choice is yours.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr Moderator, Thank you for you help and time

JP Motors, France 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Btw, you can find detailed instructions from LN here.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

removed the starter and removed the torque converter bolts

rear bumper is off and the exhaust

The wine bottle corks do work to stop the all of the coolant running out 

engine is held up with a engine frame

So gearbox out tomorrow and time the engine to fit the LN Engineering timing tools

My £300 roller bearing is in the fridge

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right, made the extra cam locking tool for bank 1, fitted the new locking tool to the other camshafts so all 4 cams locked in place

The LN pine for the front pulley was to long to clear the space from the engine to front panel, so i cut 20mm of the end 

Then locked the crankshaft

removed both rear chain tensioners and removed the IMS bearing cover

Used the LN puller to remove the bearing, it cam out with no problem, lots of old oil cam running out of the shaft

removed the new roller bearing from the fridge, it had been there for two days, fitted to the LN  tool and used a copper hammer to knocked it into

the shaft, it went in with no problem and bottomed out with a solid clunk, fitted the spring clip and cover, two chain tensioners

removed all the engine locking tools, turned it over two turns and refitted the the locking tools, both cam locking arms fitted into the 4 camshaft end ok

The rear crankshaft oil seal was leaking so changed it with a Porsche one

Fitted a new brake pipe over the gearbox as it was out

 

So all day to day fitting the auto box, starter , exhaust, engine oil and filter

Tomorrow is start up day

 

  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As you probably found, actually replacing the IMSB is easier than all of the rest of the work to get to that point. I think you are home free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hi rochouse66,

thanks for the support,   yes your right, but it makes you think will the chains jump,will the timing be out, will it start up and you cant try to start it until all the parts are back on.

So i started it yesterday, it sounded OK, i have put the top and bottom parts back to day and go for a run in the french country side with the top down. 

 

Tips

 Putting the bolts back into the ring gear to torque converter, place them on a magnet when you remove them, so they stay on the allan key when you fit them, and do not drop down the back  of the ring gear

If you remove the oil air separator you can remove the bottom starter bolt

Make sure the LN cam locking tool fits into the flywheel side of the engine and use the tool to make one for the front cams, you will have to cut it and weld it at the top as the front cams do not line up, i did have the single cam tool to line up the front engine bottom cam but i did not trust the top cam not being locked 

You can use a screwdriver to turn the ring gear over to get at the torque converter bolts, after the starter is removed use a mirror and torch to see the bolts

 

Edited by johnp
spelling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't really understand the negative reaction to my post. Bearings aren't magic: they have an inner and outer diameter. LN uses an industry standard bearing which can be sourced from hundreds of places for a variety of prices. I am replacing the IMS sealed ball bearing with an unsealed cylindrical bearing of the same dimensions and lubricating the affair with an oil feed taken from a spin-on oil filter adapter. I've taken a bearing end cap ($50 used) and drilled and tapped it to take a threaded oil line, then I'll run that line through a small hole (or cut out) in the bell housing to the oil filter.
I've been building RR and Jag engines for decades and solving similar oil starvation and vapor recirculation problems with much more exotic fixes than this. I just think the purveyors of the various kits out there for the Porsche engine are taking the mickey out of owners purely because of a problem that, statistically, happens to 10% of the cars not modified. 

Don't forget: a 10% failure rate is a 90% success rate.

In comparison, 100% of the early Honda Civic engines that did not have a timing belt change at 11,000 miles intervals suffered severe engine damage yet the replacement kit cost little more than the original equipment part. As an aside: I have heard from more than one source that simply removing the seal on the IMS bearing will lubricate it sufficiently if one uses an additive (STP, Lucas or similar). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Phavas said:

Don't really understand the negative reaction to my post. Bearings aren't magic: they have an inner and outer diameter. LN uses an industry standard bearing which can be sourced from hundreds of places for a variety of prices. and solving similar oil starvation and vapor recirculation problems with much more exotic fixes than this.

 

This is exactly were everyone that thinks they can do better themselves goes wrong.  The LN ceramic hybrid bearings cannot be "sourced from hundreds of places for a variety of prices".

The LN bearing is the final result of a lot of R&D, trying out various bearing materials until they fail, to identify the best selection of components for the final bearing.  And as that design is produced exclusively for them, you are going to have a very difficult time replicating their results  Good luck...…………..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Phavas said:

. As an aside: I have heard from more than one source that simply removing the seal on the IMS bearing will lubricate it sufficiently if one uses an additive (STP, Lucas or similar). 

 

Removing the real seal will lubricate the factory bearing without any junk additives.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those of you following this email string and want to be more informed on the failure issues and fixes for the IMS bearing I found the attached video by Pedro very informative:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, carman3 said:

For those of you following this email string and want to be more informed on the failure issues and fixes for the IMS bearing I found the attached video by Pedro very informative:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzUq2DFpeKw

 

And which contains multiple incorrect assumptions...…………….. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh heck, I've said it privately and I'll now say it publicly, JFP has done more IMS swaps than any of you combined. He has to pay in reputation and/or dollars if any of his work fails. He has a vested interest in doing it right the first time. He has no financial connection to LN. He chooses parts for their reliability and their ability to not cost him time, money and reputation. Because if it fails, it costs him in all three areas.

 

How do I know all this? Well I've been following this issue for at least 12 years to back before any Flat6/LN product was publicly available. I know how many engines they blew up testing. And since LN was the first vendor to produce a kit and the first to produce instructions and tools for something Porsche said couldn't be done, I got interested and was talking back in the day pretty regularly to Jake, emailing to Jake and Charles. How many bearing materials did they use? How many versions of the races? You buy today you aren't getting their first version of either the bearing, the accessories, the instructions or the tools. You'd be buying well beyond the 10 thousandth one they sold.

 

It is your car, your money, your choice.

 

He will probably delete this but if it saves someone from going off in a wrong direction...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.