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brought my IBM Thinkpad (small as hell) to download my digital camera pics and free up space on the card and "Lo and Behold" i'm online!

Why didn't someone tell us all that these tracks have WiFi?

i don't know how it's gonna be when i head over to the infield, but this is awesome while i'm in the grandstand.

Supercup to start in 30mins... very pumped! :jump:

will send more pics very soon...

:cheers:

post-2361-1119194151.jpg

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The F1 race was very bad for the fans... but, I agree with the FIA ruling about not adding a chicane 5 minutes before the race. These folks had a week of testing and qualifying - why do they ask for a new chicane right before the race.

Definitely a black eye for Michelin, F1 racing and and for the fans that threw crap on the track.

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I agree, adding a chicane so near race time was not the answer. I don't know what the issue was with the Michelin tires, but you'd think they could deal with this issue earlier in the week.

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I don't even want to beat a dead horse anymore since its been the only discussion in Indy since this morning but I will say this...

Today all of the racing fans lost and F1 just got a huge black mark in the minds of alot of racing fans who traveled here from all over the world.

It was so cool this morning before the race...it just ruined a great day.

Anyway here's some of the pics from a great Supercup run (a small grin that the Porsche cars ran fine today)

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I can not say that I always agree with the FIA rules but in this case I think they did the right thing - the Michelin teams did not.

FIA Statement on USGP

Written by: Adam Cooper Indianapolis, Ind. – 6/20/2005 The following statement was released Monday morning by the FIA, Formula’ 1’s governing body, regarding the controversy at the U.S. Grand Prix that led to the withdrawal of the 14 Michelin-tired cars before the start:

"Formula 1 is a sporting contest. It must operate to clear rules. These cannot be negotiated each time a competitor brings the wrong equipment to a race.

At Indianapolis, we were told by Michelin that their tires would be unsafe unless their cars were slowed in the main corner. We understood and among other suggestions offered to help them by monitoring speeds and penalizing any excess. However, the Michelin teams refused to agree unless the Bridgestone runners were slowed by the same amount. They suggested a chicane.

The Michelin teams seemed unable to understand that this would have been grossly unfair as well as contrary to the rules. The Bridgestone teams had suitable tires. They did not need to slow down. The Michelin teams’ lack of speed through turn 13 would have been a direct result of inferior equipment, as often happens in Formula 1. It must also be remembered that the FIA wrote to all of the teams and both tire manufacturers on June 1, 2005, to emphasise that “tires should be built to be reliable under all circumstances” (see correspondence on www.fia.com).

A chicane would have forced all cars, including those with tires optimized for high-speed, to run on a circuit whose characteristics had changed fundamentally – from ultra-high speed (because of turn 13) to very slow and twisting. It would also have involved changing the circuit without following any of the modern safety procedures, possibly with implications for the cars and their brakes. It is not difficult to imagine the reaction of an American court had there been an accident (whatever its cause) with the FIA having to admit it had failed to follow its own rules and safety procedures.

The reason for this debacle is clear. Each team is allowed to bring two types of tire: one an on-the-limit potential race winner, the other a back-up which, although slower, is absolutely reliable. Apparently, none of the Michelin teams brought a back-up to Indianapolis. They subsequently announced they were flying in new tires from France but then claimed that these too were unsafe.

What about the American fans? What about Formula 1 fans world-wide? Rather than boycott the race, the Michelin teams should have agreed to run at reduced speed in turn 13. The rules would have been kept, they would have earned Championship points and the fans would have had a race. As it is, by refusing to run unless the FIA broke the rules and handicapped the Bridgestone runners, they have damaged themselves and the sport.

It should also be made clear that Formula One Management and Indianapolis Motor Speedway, as commercial entities, can have no role in the enforcement of the rules."

Paris, June 20, 2005

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I can not say that I always agree with the FIA rules but in this case I think they did the right thing - the Michelin teams did not.

FIA Statement on USGP

Written by: Adam Cooper Indianapolis, Ind. – 6/20/2005 The following statement was released Monday morning by the FIA, Formula’ 1’s governing body, regarding the controversy at the U.S. Grand Prix that led to the withdrawal of the 14 Michelin-tired cars before the start:

"Formula 1 is a sporting contest. It must operate to clear rules. These cannot be negotiated each time a competitor brings the wrong equipment to a race.

At Indianapolis, we were told by Michelin that their tires would be unsafe unless their cars were slowed in the main corner. We understood and among other suggestions offered to help them by monitoring speeds and penalizing any excess. However, the Michelin teams refused to agree unless the Bridgestone runners were slowed by the same amount. They suggested a chicane.

The Michelin teams seemed unable to understand that this would have been grossly unfair as well as contrary to the rules. The Bridgestone teams had suitable tires. They did not need to slow down. The Michelin teams’ lack of speed through turn 13 would have been a direct result of inferior equipment, as often happens in Formula 1. It must also be remembered that the FIA wrote to all of the teams and both tire manufacturers on June 1, 2005, to emphasise that “tires should be built to be reliable under all circumstances” (see correspondence on www.fia.com).

A chicane would have forced all cars, including those with tires optimized for high-speed, to run on a circuit whose characteristics had changed fundamentally – from ultra-high speed (because of turn 13) to very slow and twisting. It would also have involved changing the circuit without following any of the modern safety procedures, possibly with implications for the cars and their brakes. It is not difficult to imagine the reaction of an American court had there been an accident (whatever its cause) with the FIA having to admit it had failed to follow its own rules and safety procedures.

The reason for this debacle is clear. Each team is allowed to bring two types of tire: one an on-the-limit potential race winner, the other a back-up which, although slower, is absolutely reliable. Apparently, none of the Michelin teams brought a back-up to Indianapolis. They subsequently announced they were flying in new tires from France but then claimed that these too were unsafe.

What about the American fans? What about Formula 1 fans world-wide? Rather than boycott the race, the Michelin teams should have agreed to run at reduced speed in turn 13. The rules would have been kept, they would have earned Championship points and the fans would have had a race. As it is, by refusing to run unless the FIA broke the rules and handicapped the Bridgestone runners, they have damaged themselves and the sport.

It should also be made clear that Formula One Management and Indianapolis Motor Speedway, as commercial entities, can have no role in the enforcement of the rules."

Paris, June 20, 2005

Regardless of who is at fault its the spectators who are the losers. Bernie will have still taken home his usual pocket money, Indy Motor Speedway certainly got paid for the tickets and I doubt that the Michelin teams will be giving back any of their sponsorship dollars.

Maybe those that did make money from the event and Michelin could work out a formula where 2005 ticket holders got free tickets for 2006. That wont help those who came from overseas or travelled long distances in the US but it may go part way to restoring some credibility with the fans and will have a secondary benefit of putting some people in the stands in 2006, doubt that there will be many paying customers.

Getting back to the subject I went to Indy in 2002 with my family, total cost including air tickets from Australia around $6000, the highlight, easy, Porsche Supercup and that race track.

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