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About a year ago I rebuilt the engine in my 996 and information was extremely difficult to come by. Lots of books will show you how to remove the cylinder heads but it stops there. I was able to piece things together by watching YouTube videos and a copy of the factory manual that I found on the Internet. Jake Ruby of Flat Six Innovations has a CD available that is supposed to be excellent.

 

Good luck.

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I think you mean Jake Raby of LN Engineering. The DVD is on sale right now for $299.

 

focus_on_m9x_engine_assembly.jpg

 

LNENGINEERING.COM

Rennvision’s Focus on: M9X Engine Assembly by Jake Raby goes step by step on how to correctly rebuild a Porsche M96 or M97 engine in this 5 disc DVD set.

 

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Jake's company is Flat Six Innovations, and has done all of the development work for M96/97 component's for LN Engineering , which is owned by Charles Navarro.  Jake does complete engine rebuilds, from mild to wild, and only sells educational materials such as the DVD mentioned, as well as the only existing complete engine torque spec manuals in print, but Flat Six no longer sells any hardware, only complete engines.  LN manufactures and sells all the hardware (Nickies cylinder liners, IMS retrofits, piston sets, etc.), and also sells Jakes torque manuals which are excellent reference sources.  LN will also provide machine shop services such as installing all new Nickies cylinder liners.

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On 12/18/2020 at 8:40 AM, Loren said:

I think you mean Jake Raby of LN Engineering. The DVD is on sale right now for $299.

 

focus_on_m9x_engine_assembly.jpg

 

LNENGINEERING.COM

Rennvision’s Focus on: M9X Engine Assembly by Jake Raby goes step by step on how to correctly rebuild a Porsche M96 or M97 engine in this 5 disc DVD set.

 

 

Thank you for the info. Will have to look into that.

 

On 12/18/2020 at 9:22 AM, JFP in PA said:

Jake's company is Flat Six Innovations, and has done all of the development work for M96/97 component's for LN Engineering , which is owned by Charles Navarro.  Jake does complete engine rebuilds, from mild to wild, and only sells educational materials such as the DVD mentioned, as well as the only existing complete engine torque spec manuals in print, but Flat Six no longer sells any hardware, only complete engines.  LN manufactures and sells all the hardware (Nickies cylinder liners, IMS retrofits, piston sets, etc.), and also sells Jakes torque manuals which are excellent reference sources.  LN will also provide machine shop services such as installing all new Nickies cylinder liners.

 

I ordered the torque manual so Im sure that will give me a break down on specs but was just looking for additional info on what to experience when I get the motor torn down. Thank you for the info. 

 

On 12/18/2020 at 2:04 AM, Carlvs said:

About a year ago I rebuilt the engine in my 996 and information was extremely difficult to come by. Lots of books will show you how to remove the cylinder heads but it stops there. I was able to piece things together by watching YouTube videos and a copy of the factory manual that I found on the Internet. Jake Ruby of Flat Six Innovations has a CD available that is supposed to be excellent.

 

Good luck.

 

Figured that was the case but had to ask! Thank you for the clarifications and experience. 

 

 

Last question does anyone have a break down of what bolts needs to be replaced? Or can I get away with reusing the bolts? Example bearing cage bolts? Cylinder head bolts, valve cover, etc..... That would at least let me know which needs to be ordered and what I can still reuse. 

 

Thank you again!

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Unfortunately JFP in PA  is correct, at the minimum cylinder head, rod and main bearing bolts. I would also replace timing chains the timing chain rails and possibly the tensioner depending on mileage. Good time to deal with the IMS bearing and water pump. @ $299.00 Raby’s manual will save you many hours of grief and possibly thousand of dollars and lots of heart a he.

Edited by Carlvs
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On 12/23/2020 at 10:45 AM, JFP in PA said:

Simple: Replace them all.

 

Works for me! Thank you

 

On 12/23/2020 at 11:10 AM, Carlvs said:

Unfortunately JFP in PA  is correct, at the minimum cylinder head, rod and main bearing bolts. I would also replace timing chains the timing chain rails and possibly the tensioner depending on mileage. Good time to deal with the IMS bearing and water pump. @ $299.00 Raby’s manual will save you many hours of grief and possibly thousand of dollars and lots of heart a he.

 

I was hoping to reuse some of them but guess it makes sense if Im going to tear this down and rebuild it. Chains rails, etc everything inside Ill replace for sure. IMS is a must and figured I do the pumps, thermostat, etc....

 

On 12/23/2020 at 11:15 AM, Carlvs said:

A link to my parts used and prices for the 99 996 engine rebuild. Still running after 5,000 miles. Fingers crossed every time I go out 🙂

https://www.ez-bizwebs.com/3.4/images/Spreadsheet/Porsche996_EngineRebuild2.pdf

 

 

Thank you for that break down list. That should help me order what I need and is pretty good way to do a total break down on costs at the end! Might even look at the same places you purchased your stuff at as well. 🙂

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You may want to consider the following:

Bolts of grade 8.8 (=the lowest grade used in and around the powertrain) that are tightened to the listed below torque values (or less) can be cleaned and reused with blue/medium strength thread locking compound.

With these torque values grade 8.8 fasteners are within their elastic stretch, thus keep their original properties and can be re-used.

M6 10Nm 7.4 ft-lbs

M8 25Nm 18.4 ft-lbs

M10 49Nm 36 ft-lbs

M12 86Nm 63  ft-lbs 

 

Other criteria to decide whether to replace or not are:

-can you be sure that the fastener was never over-torqued?

-is its head still in good shape to be removed easily in the future?

-is the galvanic (zinc) anti-corrosion plating still in good (enough) shape to be re-used?

-are you willing to put the time (=money) into cleaning off the old micro-encapsulation and put thread-locking compound on the fastener when fitting it?

 

Keep in mind that all the specified torque values by the manufacturer are only proven for new fasteners of his spec.

Re-using a fastener and applying  liquid thread locking compound to it might yield friction between the threads different from that of the micro-encapsulation on the OEM bolts there by changing the resulting clamping force.

In reality the differences are small enough that the resulting connection  is fit for purpose.

 

 

A factory WSM will answer these questions with 'no'/'not worth taking the risk' and will dictate 'replace fasteners' (and make some money in the process all those times the customer foots the bill).

 

Edited by hardtailer
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  • 2 weeks later...

"101 Projects" is a nice resource for casual/weekend type jobs... Don't kid yourself that it will help with an engine rebuild - it would be a huge and very expensive mistake. I wouldn't even trust it for something as (relatively) simple as an IMS retro fit... The Bentley manual is in a whole different league than 101 projects, but still not comprehensive for an engine re-build. The suggestion(s) above from JFP and others are good. Jake Raby/FSI are well established experts on the M96 platform and have "basically written the book" on development/repairing/upgrading the M96/97 platform

Edited by dporto
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