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Hi all, given that there is an inordinate amount of things that one can inadvertently damage/destroy when DIY'ing an AC recharge I am loathe to try it myself.

Which led me to the question which is "Does one go straight to a dealer for an AC recharge, or do you trust your pride and joy to a local AC shop ?"

What is the expected charge for a regas (assuming no leaks) & is it false economy to take it to a non-P dealer ? (I'm based in San Francisco, CA & the car is a '99 Boxster)

Your opinions would be welcome !

Thanks

James

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An A/C recharge is simple and straight forward. You can take it to almost any oil change shop and have it done while you wait. The only thing you'll have to do is show them where the check/fill valves are. They are in the back of the front trunk on the passenger side under the plastic cover. There's one screw in the cover and it's a torx type head.

It's a very easy DIY if you want to do it. You can get a gun at a local auto parts store that has a guage on it and holds a can of refridgerant. It has a trigger for filling, and release the trigger to check the pressure. The valves on the car are marked H and L on the caps and they are different sizes so you can't accidentally try and fill the high side.

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Hi,

I concur with deliriousga. The A/C recharge is a definite DIY job and much cheaper than a shop. Because of all the recovery machinery they are forced to now have, their rates skyrocketed. With an R-12 system, they're the guys to use. But, with an R-134a system, it's easy to do.

Any auto parts store will have a kit complete with manifold, Refrigerant and compressor oil. Simply connect to the Low side of the circuit, start the car and turn on the A/C, then push the trigger.

One note. Theoretically, an A/C system should never need recharging. If you do, it usually means a leak in the system, usually past the 'O' rings, but sometimes because a stone put a pinhole in the condenser. On the Boxster, there's lots of tubing and numerous connections, so some leakage is expected over time. Recharge the system and watch it to see how long it takes for the refrigerant level to drop again. If sooner than a couple seasons, I'd investigate the cause(s) further. A flourecsant dye is sold which you inject into the system. Then, with a Blacklight, you look for any leaks in the system. Hope this helps.

Happy Motoring!...Jim'99

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  • 2 years later...

Guys,

I'm going to attempt a DIY re-charge on my '99 Boxster... wish me luck. I know the process isn't complicated but so far I haven't found a how-to, and I don't have a workshop manual.

Could someone kindly write down the steps. The correct pressures and photos would be really helpful too. This'll be a great resource for everyone.

Cheers,

Simon

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Guys,

I'm going to attempt a DIY re-charge on my '99 Boxster... wish me luck. I know the process isn't complicated but so far I haven't found a how-to, and I don't have a workshop manual.

Could someone kindly write down the steps. The correct pressures and photos would be really helpful too. This'll be a great resource for everyone.

Cheers,

Simon

Taken from the Service Manual.

1) Remove refrigerant by suction.

2) Remove faulty part

3) Evacuate

4) Check the system for leaks

5) Rinse with refrigarent

6) Empty the system by suction again.

7) Evacuate

8) Fill

Some things to remember....small hose is always hi pressure and large hose is low pressure.

Holds 850g of 134a refrigerant

Oil 195+- 15cm3 ND 8.......whatever this amounts to i have no idea.....

Just don't forget to add the Oil.

Edited by seafeye
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